hospital in the woods

A Holiday Story

So this is a Chistmas story my mom told me while I was home recently and i thought y’all might enjoy.

So, one Christmas back in the 60′s, my great-grandmother was reminiscing about Christmas in England, and how they used to have pheasant for Christmas, but Ohio sucks and they’d never get to do something like that.

Well Shit!  goes my grandfather,  them woods are full of pheasants, I’ll get you one.  So grandpa and a dubiously related man named “uncle popeye” went out with shotguns to get great-grandma a pheasant for Christmas dinner.

They’re gone for a LONG time.  according to mom, they were basically expecting grandpa and Popeye to be gone for a few hours and come back with a store-bought chicken and apologies.

Instead, they come back eight hours later, covered in mud and freezing cold from the Cleveland winter, but Surprise!  they have a Pheasant.  Great-grandma gives them a lecture about staying out so long and worrying her, but agrees to dress the bird so they can all have a traditional English Roast Pheasant.   Grandpa and Popeye retire to the living room to drink beer and talk about what great woodsmen they are when Great-grandma screams from the kitchen.

“TOM!!”  She bellows and literally every male in the house jumps because literally every man has been named “Tom” for three generations at that point. 
“THERE’S NO BULLET HOLE IN THIS BIRD.”

They both look massively sheepish and eventually admit that they hadn’t had much luck finding pheasants in the woods and were about to go to the store to get her a chicken when they… backed over the pheasant.

“Then what were you idiots doing in the woods for eight hours?”

“We weren’t out there for THAT long-” Popeye starts before grandpa decks him.   
Grandma and Great-grandma have to menace them with wooden spoons to get the truth out, but eventually they take thier oversize hiking boots off to reveal bandages.

Turns out they had only been in the woods for Two hours looking for pheasants before LITERALLY tripping over one, and they both reflexively aim at the ground and… Shoot each other in the foot.  They hadn’t backed over the Pheasant in the woods.  They’d backed over it in the Hospital parking lot.

And that’s the story of how my great-grandmother made a Roast Pheasant and the ladies of the house got to eat the whole thing while Grandpa and Popey had to watch.

Why Taylor Swift Is The Greatest Living Songwriter (Under 60) Taylor

I recently found myself at a BMI Awards dinner where the song publishing rights organization was handing out some career achievement awards, the first of which went to the classic ‘60s team of Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil. And then they gave one to Taylor Swift, in one of those cases where they have to name the award to the person it’s being given to because it feels a little too uncomfortable to give the standard “lifetime” award to someone in her 20s. In her speech, Swift gave props to her elders: “I first wanted to say to Cynthia Weil, to Barry Mann, and to Carole King, you, the Brill Building, your legacy, are the reason we do what we do. Many of us in this room can’t dream of accomplishing what you guys have accomplished.”

Except she already has. And (heresy alert!) more. Swift is a rightful heir to the Brill Building tradition, with all the mastery of pop craftsmanship that entails, but she’s also the finest contemporary inheritor we have to the confessional singer/songwriter throne. She’s Barry Mann and Bruce Springsteen, together in one silver metallic mini dress-wearing package. That’s why I say Taylor Swift is our greatest living songwriter—under-60 division, just to be safe. But I digress.

I am glad I’m alive in the prime era of Taylor Swift the same way I felt glad to be alive in the half-century of Dylan and Springsteen and The Beatles and Costello. I’ve leaned forward into my first listens to 1989 and Red the same way I thirsted for the on-sale moments of The River and Nebraska and Imperial Bedroom and Time Out of Mind. These are the moments — all too infrequent in the 2010s, if you’re a recovering rock snob — that you live for as a music fan and especially singer/songwriter aficionado: the opening of a magazine you subscribe to, in which the editor-publisher has promised to bleed onto every page in some fashion. You look forward to admiring the craft and you want to know that you’ve been handed the next six months’ or year’s worth of earworms all at once. But most of all you want to feel you’re about to make that passionate connection with a deep-feeler who knows you better than your own best excuse for a best friend.

Where Swift is most like the great confessional rock writers, and least like the Brill Building set, is in her propensity to fill her songs with seemingly stray details. If you’re writing by the books, you learn early on not to include random asides that throw listeners out of the commonality of the lyric. But Springsteen, Dylan, Costello, et al. have faith that, whatever is lost in relatability by including something specifically autobiographical is a gain for fans who know that that weird minutiae confirms the rest of the emotions as authentic. When Swift interrupts Out of the Woods to mention “Twenty stitches in a hospital room/Remember when you hit the brakes too soon,” that’s about as un-Brill as Bruce talking about Crazy Janey and Greaser Lake. But the specificity of the bridge makes the universality of chorus more meaningful, even if the unstable relationship you’re being reminded of by the song didn’t involve a visit to the ER. It may seem peculiar to the 21st century that we can confirm who the significant others in Swift’s songs are by picking out lyrical details about eye colors or fire signs or scarves and checking them against her exes. But is finding out whether All Too Well was about Jake or Harry that terribly different than the thrill of figuring out whether Dylan’s It Ain’t Me, Babe was about Suzi or Joan, but with Google taking the place of waiting years for a biography?

The position that Swift is Actually Quite Awesome is not nearly as controversial among the older white guy set than it would have been a few years ago. You only get a B for courage now, not the former A, if you speak up at a cocktail party and say, “No, I don’t mean it’s good for what it is, or she’s a positive role model for my daughter or a gateway drug to Courtney Barnett, I mean she is truly the shit.” (Crickets may still ensue, mind you, if no longer outright shaming.) You can attribute this in part to Ryan Adams, whose album-length cover version of '1989’ did a fairly excellent job of indie-splaining Swift to people who only needed to hear that her songs could be rearranged in the styles of The Smiths and Elliott Smith to sign off on her. As much as I enjoy Adams’ '1989’, it falls just a little short as reinvention, or revelation: You kind of sense him wanting to get credit for being the first to discover that Swift’s frothiest sounding songs all have minor chords and melancholy under the Max Martin-ization. The real problem with Adams’ interpretations—which is not a fatal problem, given how good Wildest Dreams sounds as an R.E.M. song—is that he doesn’t really have that much use for the words, given how uninterested he is in emphasizing particular words or phrases and how he throws away some of the best lines. (To be fair, this is pretty much Adams’ approach toward his own lyrics, too.) Not that with Swift the lyrics are everything, when she has such a gift for melodic delights and surprises… but, yeah, the words are kind of everything.

Going back to Swift’s 2006 self-titled debut now, it sounds a little primitive, in retrospect. Which is fine: “primitivist” is exactly what you’d expect or hope for from a girl who released at 16 an album of songs she’d mostly written at 14 and 15. No one should sound 30 as a teenager, unless she’s Fiona Apple. (Hearing Apple’s eloquent teen jadedness when she was a freshman artist felt as impressive and spooky as Captain Howdy’s voice coming out of Regan MacNeil’s mouth.) At the time, it was a widely held assumption that co-writer Liz Rose was the brains of the operation. But you couldn’t help but notice that the best song on the album, Our Song, was a solo Swift composition, penned before she had access to the best song editors Music Row could offer. It sounded utterly conversational , establishing Swift’s knack for writing in complete sentences in a way that sounds completely diaristic and completely musical. It embraced both metaphor (“Our song is the slamming screen door”) and the meta (being one of those songs that is self-conscious about how it is, in fact, a song). It was winsome, guileless, and juvenile—in the best way—on top of being freakily expert for a song written by an underclassman for a school talent show.


Two years later (Swift’s follow-up albums have always been two years later, up until now), she came up with Fearless, which was so much more accomplished that it won her the Grammy for Album of Year, the first time that’d been accomplished by a record made by a teenager. But looking back at it now, you can see it was the only time she ever really marked time, stylistically, as a record-maker. The breakthrough that mattered was 2010’s Speak Now, which was her first real “pop album” (at least for those of us who pay attention to content and not the officially mandated tropes that insisted that honor belongs to '1989’). Just this once, she wrote the entire album by herself, in a rather deliberate F-you to everyone who figured she’d been propped up by Nashville pros. Similar auteurist turns by pop and country artists with points to prove have not always gone so spectacularly but Swift used the opportunity not just to defend but to diversify, as great writers and investors will. This DIY show of tour-de-force ran the gauntlet of effervescent girl-group pop (the title song), Evanescence goth-rock (Haunted), cheerful neo-bluegrass (Mean), girl-on-mean-girl pop-punk (Better Than Revenge), and even a token transitional single in the country-folk style of the first two albums (Mine).

'1989’ is the masterpiece of her career so far
'Speak Now’ also incidentally included the most searing, stark, boldly confessional song by a major artist since John Lennon’s Cold Turkey. (Hyperbole intended.) This was Dear John, a slow, epic-length missive to a love-'em-young-and-leave-'em type that was jaw-dropping in its vulnerability and rage. Never mind the lucky stroke that apparently had the rock star who used and discarded Swift being a guy really named John; Swift does like her literalism, so she probably wouldn’t written a public dear-John letter to a Tom, Dick, or (even) Harry. It’s a ballad that creates the illusion of the artist having vomited onto the page—for those of us who like that sort of thing—but actually belies a severe level of craft beneath the bile. The song rises to an emotional victory, as Swift goes from paying witness to “all the girls that you’ve run dry (that) have tired, lifeless eyes 'cause you’ve burned them out” to being the one who “took your matches before fire could catch me, so don’t look now: I’m shining like fireworks over your sad, empty town.” Compare this to the other great fireworks song of 2010, Katy Perry’s, and there is simply no pyromaniacal contest.


With 'Red’ another couple of years later, she bid a fond F-you to her own previous F-you and reintroduced co-writers to her stable, now adding Max Martin and Shellback as collaborators on a choice trio of songs, as if to say: I dare you to knock this block off. Aside from the handful of tracks with those guys, though, 'Red’ felt more like a classic singer/songwriter album than anything she’d done before or certainly since. It was all about lost love, and hardly for the first time, but now Swift was jettisoning her “better than revenge” approach to achieving payback in song and taking equal responsibility for relational failures, and it was all very sensitive and self-examining and enlightened. So when I got my first listen to the determinedly frothier '1989’ a couple of years still later, I lamented the loss of the previous album’s hard-fought breakthroughs in songwriting maturity.

Lamented it for about two minutes, that is. '1989’ is the masterpiece of her career, so far, and that’s not withstanding the thick gloss of candy coating that covered the whole endeavor now that Martin was fully on board as guiding executive producer as well as hands-on guy on about half the tracks. The meme favored by some critics, that Swift had sold out on us with all this interference by the reigning kings of the pop machinery—and after all we’d done to defend her as an artiste!—was misguided even by the usual standards of stick-up-one’s-ass bias and entitlement. It may seem counter-intuitive, for those of us who usually live and die by singer/songwriter yardsticks, to say that '1989’ is Swift’s most mature album, when there is barely a guitar anywhere in earshot for the singer’s tears to fall upon. But as it turns out, it is possible to talk intelligently, walk in rhythm, and chew bubblegum at the same time.

Yes, '1989’ is a less outrightly emotional album than any of its predecessors. Swift herself has said it’s the first time she wasn’t writing in the wake of a heartache. And that’s part of what makes the album so seasoned and smart. If all the previous albums were her “breakup album,” '1989’ is her maybe-we-are-ever-getting-back-together album. It’s about being just a little bit rueful about past relationships—in a less world-ending, drama queen-y fashion than the take-no-prisoners approach that admittedly made a lot of us fall for her in the first place – and largely about that impulse to reconnect, even as you sit by the phone and consider what a terrible idea that would be. She’s thinking back on a breakup that wasn’t that traumatic (possibly one with Harry Styles, if we’re to take the cheeky title of Style literally), and considering every negative and possible angle to rekindling an old flame. As a result, a lot of the songs on '1989’ are about mixed emotions, which are by and large the hardest kind to write.

She understands more brilliantly the power of dynamics — that even the most grandiose song can benefit by suddenly getting completely naked for 40 seconds.

And here is where we quote another great pop writer, F. Scott Fitzgerald, who famously said: “The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function.” Swift is showing us that first-rate intelligence when she encapsulates the divisions we all experience as we find the good and bad in people, lovers and otherwise: “You always knew how to push my buttons/You give me everything and nothing.” “Ten months sober, I must admit/Just because you’re clean don’t mean you don’t miss it.” “This love is good, this love is bad/This love is alive, back from the dead.” As the CEO of her own corporation, Swift has had a lot of time to think about risk/reward ratios. Grappling with that in matters of love is part of her giftedness and increasing talent as a writer.

I think again of the congratulations Ryan Adams got for bringing out the sadder emotional undercurrents in '1989’’s material. He deserves some of it, but it’s not as if Swift didn’t make that a fairly easy discovery. Bad Blood is the most blatantly confectionary song on '1989,’ with a sing-song-y quality of the chorus makes you think Avril Lavigne, if you’re making comparisons. But would Avril, or any other pop star you can bring to mind, have interrupted the beats and chants for a lengthy, virtually a cappella bridge that brings the mood down with its warnings about bullet holes and living with ghosts? It’s akin to the hyper-produced song on her previous album, I Knew You Were Trouble, where Swift puts an end to all the dubstep to very quietly wonder, almost sotto voce, whether the object of her affections ever loved her, the other girl, “or anyone.” In the big beat era, she understands more brilliantly the power of dynamics—that even the most grandiose song can benefit by suddenly getting completely naked for 40 seconds.

Blank Space, meanwhile, shows Swift to have under-heralded skills as maybe the greatest comedy writer since Eminem. As probably everyone who wasn’t completely divorced from pop culture in 2015 knows, Swift wrote it as a sort of spoof of her own image as a serial romancer (which is to say, a girl known for dating about half as many partners as a typical guy her age). When she says she’s got a blank space “and I’ll write your name,” it’s understood that she means she’ll write an excoriating song about the dude later on—she’s in on that joke. But amid the nearly Randy Newman-esque humor and exaggeration, there’s a real undercurrent of pain and possible self-knowledge. The time limits that come up in lines like “I can make the bad guys good for a weekend” and “Find out what you want/Be that girl for a month” don’t sound like they’re being played strictly for ironic laughs.

She is maybe the greatest comedy writer since Eminem.

Is she a spokeswoman for a generation? You might be on thin ice using that kind of phraseology for someone who spends so little time writing outside of the relational realm. But Swift does have an understanding of impermanence that seems uniquely millennial. She’s talked about how she looks at the length of her parents’ marriage and no longer takes it as a given she’ll find a lifetime partnership, which would probably come as a surprise to the younger Swift who wrote Love Story. But she finds a haunting beauty in what we might call planned obsolescence. “Wildest Dreams” pulls off the particularly tricky time-traveling feat of looking ahead to a future in which you’re looking back to the past… and of being intensely sexy and rueful at the same time. “You’ll see me in hindsight, tangled up with you all night, burning it down,” she sings. “Someday when you leave me, I bet these memories follow you around.” That moment when you’re in the heat of passion, leaving your body just long enough to realize you’ll be nostalgic for it someday? If you’ve ever experienced it, you probably never thought somebody would nail it in a song.

Not that you have to be a millennial to be capable of considering how things are likely to end even in the midst of everything going right. I was trying to remember what song the future-nostalgia of “Wildest Dreams” reminded me of, in some weird, roundabout way, and then it came to me: Dylan’s You’re Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go. It’s maybe heretical to compare the bard with this girl from the north country, but not so heretical to say: Great minds wistfully think alike. And we should all feel a little lonely if either of them ditched us.

anonymous asked:

hey hun!!! since you did a leo one, can i ask for a friends to lovers scenario with hyuk??? thank you so much 😭💕

of course,,,my boy deserves more love~!!
find leo (here)

  • you and hyuk work basically the same delivery job at two fast food places right near each other so u meet because ur both chaining up ur bikes in the morning
  • and hyuk’s like “cool frame!” and ur like “thanks, i like urs too- wait what is that?” and hyuk proudly touches the sticker beside his handlebar and is like “that? that’s my uchiha clan sticker!” and ur like this kids a nerd
  • but it’s cool because he’s a funny, tall nerd 
  • and sometimes when u guys finish deliveries at the same time ull take lunch together at the local park
  • and hyuk’s long legs look so funny any time he sits on the swings because they like bend up
  • and he’s always like “one of the dudes i split rent with is such a mom,,,he keeps making me sandwiches and snacks to bring to work,,,,he’s so nosy,,,,,,”
  • and ur like ok but look at u. ur eating that sandwich he made right
  • and hyuk with straight up crumbs on his mouth holding the sandwich half eaten is like “god damn that hakyeon,,,,,he makes really good pb&j ok”
  • but it’s super nice to hang out with him because hyuk never seems to have a serious care in the world and sure u guys rag on ur bosses but he’s never,,,,,complaining too much
  • like a lot of ur friends all they have to say is negative things about work or school but hyuk seems to brush it off and is thankful for his job and,,,,,idk just a positive kid
  • but also completely savage he told u about he switched his friend ravi’s toothpaste with hummus once and u were like NO and he was like YEAH and till this day he DOESNT know it was me
  • but hyuk gives u lots of laughs,,,,and is always cutely ruffling the top of ur hair and trying to get u to admit that he’s faster on his bike than u are
  • and one afternoon as u get off work u notice that hyuk’s bike looks a little bent up,,,,,like there’s a dent in the frame and ur pretty sure the chains not on right
  • and when hyuk walks out of his job u see the makeshift bandages wrapped around his arm and the bruising black eye and ur like ????? WHAT HAPPENED
  • and hyuk tries to laugh, only to wince in pain when he does and is like “i had a little accident,,,,,it’s nothing though!!! owner got mad at me because i spilt the food so that’s coming out of my paycheck.”
  • and u can hear that he’s trying to come off??? sarcastic
  • but u can hear the slight sadness too and ur like “is ur arm ok??” and hyuk is like “i think it’s broken. probably gonna go home and s-”
  • and ur like hell no you’re not you’re going to the hospital
  • and hyuk is like hospital??? but i can just make a cast at home with some wood-
  • and u roll ur eyes because once again hyuk is taking it “easy” but ur pretty sure not even his happiness can fix a broken bone so ur like “hospital. c’mon ill even bike u there if i have to.”
  • and hyuk snorts because please u wouldn’t be able to and ur like get on my bike and try me,,,,,but seeing as tho it really would be close to impossible hyuk is like FINE lets go do u have change for the bus
  • and ofc the ER tells hyuk he needs a cast and as ur leaving with him,,,it’s a lil late
  • and ur like “since u got it taken out of ur paycheck ill treat u to dinner. at the 7/11 what cup ramen do u want.”
  • and hyuk wiggles his eyebrows and is like “is this a date?~ are u gonna feed me because this cast is in the way~”
  • and for a moment ur reflex is to shoot some comment back but,,,,,u look at hyuk,,,,,,,and tbh,,,,,,even tho he’s kind of silly he really,,,,,is ur type
  • tall,,,,cute,,,,good sense of humor,,,,,like,,,,,
  • so u straighten up a bit and ur like “yeah. it’s a date. ill even feed you.”
  • and hyuk seems surprised,,,,the tips of his ears going pink and ur like “unless u dont want it to be then ill just get u ur ram-” but hyuk shakes his head and seems to want to put his hand out but the cast makes him wince and ur like ?? and he’s like “no,,,,i,,,i want it. too bad it’s our first date and i can’t even hold ur hand tho,,,,,”
  • and u look at him for a second before bursting out into laughter
  • and hyuks like ???? and ur like “dummy,,,only one of ur hands is broken here ill go over to ur other side and we can hold hands”
  • and hyuk’s like RIGHT,,,,,,,,
  • but it’s cute u guys are adorable and u do feed him ramen even tho the cashier at 7/11 keeps glaring at you because u and hyuk spent 15 min debating in front of him about which flavor of ramen is the best
  • true love honestly  
Differences between ‘‘por’‘ and ‘‘para’‘


Differences between ‘’por’’ and ‘’para’’ , these prepositions are one of the most difficult things to get right for a foreigner, the truth it’s my pals, that they are indeed hard to distinguish. But don’t feel bad about it, if you ask a native speaker what’s the difference between those two, they won’t even know what to answer, so in this post I’ll give it a shot.

Roughly translated, the two correspond to the English ‘’for’’ and that is what mainly causes confusions.

The most common and important difference is that ‘’por’’ is used to explain the cause or reason of something and ‘’para’’ is generally used to explain an aim, objective or purpose:

POR


‘’Vine a Argentina por mi familia’’ – I came to Argentina because of my family.

’Las inundaciones crecen por la falta de arboles’’ – The floods become frequent because of the lack of trees.

‘’No salieron de su casa por el temor que le tienen a los ladrones’’ – They didn’t leave their house because of their fear towards bandits.


PARA

’Compré este regalo para ti’’ – I bought this present for you.

‘’Cerraron la ventana para que no entre viento’’ – They closed the window so the wind couldn’t in.

‘’Traje esta heladerita para guardar las cervezas ‘’ – I brought this fridge to save the beers here.

Do you see now? The main difference is quite clear I think, meanwhile, in each three sentences of the beginning, ‘’por’’ is used to explain the REASON of the events (the reason I visited Argentina is my family, the reason floods are growing in number is the lack of trees, the reason they don’t go out of their house is the fear towards thieves), and ‘’para’’ is used to explain the OBJECTIVE of your action (I bought this present with the aim of giving it to you, they closed the window with the aim of not allowing wind to keep coming in, I brought this little fridge with the aim of keeping beers cool).

You can’t obviously mix cause with aim, because you’ll get a semantic and interpretative mess:

*Las inundaciones crecen para la falta de arboles – Notice how important it is to consider the subject with ‘’para’’. You see, sintactically speaking, ‘’para’’ in this function introduces an INDIRECT OBJECT, this can be represented as ‘’x did y for z’’, so there is someone who does something PARA someone, in these situations the indirect object.

Now let’s see the other functions, separate, starting with por:

Amount of time:

You can use ‘’por’’ to express the amount of seconds, minutes, hours, days and other time units which took you to do the action (or will take, or usually takes you):

-‘’Voy como estudiante de intercambio a Alemania por tres años’’ – I’m going to Germany as an exchange student for three years.

-‘’Trabajé en Rumania por tres años’’ – I worked in Romania for three years.

-‘’Vengo aquí todos los veranos por vacaciones’’ – I came here every summer for vacations. (This one has the two values: the reason of coming and the period of time, your vacations)

Locative:

As locative, you may use ‘’por’’ to talk about a place or an object and you are not 100% sure about their location, the doubt it’s inside the semantics of this function:

-‘’No encuentro mis lentes, estaban por aquí’’ (I can’t find my glasses, they were around here)

-‘’Creo que la casa estaba por este barrio’’ (I think that the house was around this neighborhood)

-‘’Sandrá está caminando por la arbolada’’ (Sandra is walking through the woods)

-‘’El hospital queda por Mitre’’ (The hospital is around Mitre st.)

As you see, in each example ‘’por’’ express location, in the first example, we are searching our glasses (in our room, idk) and we know that they are there, but we don’t know where specifically, they are just somewhere in our room. In the second example, we know the house is in that neighborhood, but where precisely? In the corner of the street? Or in the middle of it? We don’t know…

In the third example we know that Sandra is doing that: walk, and we know she’s walking through the woods, she told us that before leaving, but in which part of the woods? Deep in the woods? Right at the edge? Through the road? We don’t have telepathic powers, so we don’t know precisely. The same happens with the last example, which is more frequent in the argentinian variety of Spanish, we know there is x hospital by the Mitre street, that’s the important thing, I don’t need to tell you if the hospital lies next to a market or to a gay club, it’s just there in Mitre street.

Exchange:

-‘’Te cambio este reloj por tu perro’’ (I’ll trade with you this watch for your dog)

-‘’Cambió a sus amigas por su novio’’ (She changed her friends for his boyfriend)

Not too much to say about this function, is mostly used in trading contexts, as the first example depicts. The ‘’por’’ always is placed between the things that are getting traded (x por x).

Media:

-‘’Viajaré a Alemania por avión, no por barco’’ (I’ll travel to Germany by plane, not by ship)

-‘’Mándame los resultados por Facebook’’ (Send me the results via facebook)

‘’Por’’ is also used to express the media, via or way you travel or do some actions.

Price:

-‘’Vendo un kilo de naranjas por 30 pesos’’ (I’m selling a kilo of oranges at 30 bucks)

“Vendo este auto por 2000 euros’’ (I’m selling this car at 2000 euros)

Actually, in matters of prices and selling, the preposition used to introduce the price may be either ‘’por’’, or it can also be ‘’a’’ (Te vendo este auto a 2000 euros).

Distribution:

-‘’Una vez por turno, puedes robar una carta’’ (Once per turn, you can draw a card)

-‘’La pizza cuesta 50 pesos por persona’’ (The pizza costs 50 bucks a person)

-‘’Es un caramelo por niño’’ (It is a candy for each kid)

‘’Por’’ introduces in these cases the measure of distribution, in the second example you are stating that 50 pesos shall be paid by each person eating it.

Passive voice:

According to Wikipedia, the voice ‘’(…)describes the relationship between the action (or state) that the verb expresses and the participants identified by its arguments (subject, object, etc.). When the subject is the agent or doer of the action, the verb is in the active voice. When the subject is the patient, target or undergoer of the action, the verb is said to be in the passive voice.’’

According to that paragraph, if we have a sentence like ‘’La policía persiguió a Pepe’’ (The police chased Pepe), we will find out it is in the active voice, since we clearly see an agent, a doer of the action, which is the police.

The passive voice of this verb would modify it’s relationship with the parts of the sentence, thus, the object (Pepe) would become the subject… but not as an agent. You see, this is the particular thing with the voice change, the passive voice, at least in Spanish and English, doesn’t only imply a syntactical change, but also semantical: The subject isn’t an agent anymore, but a PACIENT. This is, the subject, instead of doing the action, will be AFECTED by it:

-‘’Pepe (subject) fue perseguido por la policía’’ (Agentive complement)

-Pepe was chased by the police.

‘’Por’’, in the passive voice, introduces a compliment, known as ‘’Agentive compliment’’ or ‘’Complemento agente’’, which, as the name points out, introduces the doer of the action.

Soon to do an action.

This is not too important, because it’s informal and it can also be replaced by ‘’a punto de’’. It must be always used combined with the auxiliary ‘’estar’’.

-‘’Estoy por limpiar la mesa / Estoy a punto de limpiar la mesa’’ (I’m about to clean the table)    

-‘’La anaconda está por matarme / La anaconda está a punto de matarme’’ (The anaconda is about to kill me)

Para – Objective.

Now we’ll describe ‘’Para’’ and its functions, the most important use of ‘’para’’ has to do with the objective of an action, not the reason that causes the action, but rather, the reason you are aiming to reach with your action, basically, your goal. This first function may be easily translated to English as ‘’in order to’’, in German and Dutch, ‘’um (…) zu’’ and ‘’om (…) te’’ respectively.

-‘’Voy a ir a Suecia para estudiar sueco’’ (I’m going to Sweden in order to study Swedish)

-‘’Ryckhard usaba su espada para matar dragones’’ (Ryckhard used his sword to kill dragons)

-‘’Compré torta para comer esta tarde’’ (I bought cake in order to eat it this evening)

There is a function that is pretty similar to these one, it differs because it involves movement, I call it ‘’destiny’’ because there is a receiver of a thing you are transporting:

’Llevo esta caja de bombones para mi novia’’ (I’m taking this chocolate box to my girlfriend’s)

’Esta nota es para el correo’’ (This note is for the mail)

‘’Traigo este regalo para Nico’’ (I bring this gift for Nico)

See how the each sentence has a verb that implies movement? (To take, to bring) Except for the second one, in which the verb is hidden. These sentence describe a movement towards someone who is a receiver (an indirect object), represented in the sentence by ‘’para (…)’’ that will get that x thing (the direct object) that you are carrying.

End of a term.

‘’Para’’ has a temporal function too, it is used to establish a limit or end to a given period of time, we are obviously talking about a term established for an essay, a document, a homework, or some task that we are asked to do… or we ask someone else to do. For example, your teacher gives you some homework, and it has to be done for tomorrow (para mañana)

-‘’Necesito que hagan esta tarea para mañana (I need you to do this homework for tomorrow)

-‘’Quiero que me traigas el informe para mañana’’ (I want you to bring me the report for tomorrow)

 

Direction.

In this case, ‘’para’’ express the direction towards x place your going to, it would be like the Dutch ‘’naartoe’’. Also, expressing direction using ‘’para’’ is pretty informal, in more formal contexts, ‘’a’’ is used.

-‘’En quince minutos, salgo para tu casa’’ (In fifteen minutes, I’m going to your house)

-‘’Me voy para Alemania’’ (I’m going to Germany)

Opinion.

In this case, ‘’para’’ introduces someone who has an opinion, most of the times, this clause stays away from the rest of the sentence, you’ll see many times at the beginning of the sentence, but it also may be placed in other positions, ALWAYS, between comas (not at the beginning, obviously)

-‘’Para Pepe, el partido de Argentina estaba arreglado ‘’(Acording to Pepe, Argentina’s match was fixed)

-‘’Para mí, estás hablando pura mierda’’ (To me, you are just speaking pure bullcrap)

-‘’Los bordes eran, para María, muy filosos’’ (The edges were, acording to Maria, to Sharp)

You see how the two first sentences have that ‘’para’’ clause at the beginning and in the third one, in the middle of the sentence, totally isolated from the rest of the sentence in each example.


Temporal para.

The temporal function of para is to point out an exact moment in time, it can be used to refer either past or future events, but almost never to refer to present events.

-‘’Para navidad, fuimos de mi abuelo’’ (On Christmas, we visited my grandpa)

-‘’Se crearán 900 [novecientas] escuelas para el año que viene’’ (900 schools will be created for the next year)

-‘’Mis amigos vienen para mi cumpleaños’’ (My friends are coming for my birthday)

Okay people, I think these are the most important ones, there may be a couple not so relevant that are missing, but I may talk about them in other post, the most important ones are here… I hope it helped because I noticed there are many people that struggle with these two prepositions that clearly are sons of a huge and naughty bitch.

‘ntill the next post, greetings qts! Hasta la próximaaaaaaaaaaaaaa

8

“Did you happen to read the cause of death?” “Exposure. His body was found in the woods after escaping the hospital.” “Missing for only seven hours in July. How does a 20 year old boy die of exposure on a warm, summer night in Oregon, Dr Scully?”

- The X Files (1x01)

popsugar.com
Grey's Anatomy: This Season's Finale May Be 1 of the Worst Yet | Popsugar
By Ryan Roschke

We’ve still got a ways to go until the 13th season of Grey’s Anatomy comes to a close. Even so, time is ticking, and any fan of Grey’s knows the finale episodes are always a doozy. We’ve got to prepare ourselves. This week, the Grey’s cast participated in a panel for this year’s Paleyfest, and we were lucky enough to snag them for red carpet interviews. Naturally, we had to ask about the danger that lies ahead. Here’s how the cast teased the upcoming season 13 finale.

It Will Be “Explosive”
Jessica Capshaw, who plays Dr. Arizona Robbins on the show, had quite an interesting word to tease the final season. “There’s something that’s going to happen that’s quite explosive. But I can’t tell you who it’s about.” The key word is of course “explosive,” but what does it mean?! Does she mean literal explosions near or inside the hospital?! Or will we see some kind of crazy emotional altercation take place?

The Episode Is One For the History Books
There’s more evidence to support an actual explosion, or at least some other kind of huge disaster. “Oh my gosh,” Chandra Wilson (Miranda Bailey) exclaimed. “I think this will be a bigger ending finale than some of our previous ones. I think we gotta go big and loud and strong. We haven’t filmed the last episode yet, but I have a feeling it’s going to be loud.” Big and loud and strong?! Something seriously devastating is probably going down.

Even the Cast Was Shocked’
If there was any lingering doubt that things are going off the rails, allow Caterina Scorsone (Amelia Shepherd) to get rid of it. Scorsone teased that the episode would leave fans with “dropped jaws. Like we had at the table read. There was a lot of ‘WHAT?!’ Throwing scripts … there were a lot of expletives. So, yeah, the last couple episodes are shocking. Even for Shondaland.” If you ask us, it’s the “even for Shondaland” part that really gives us palpitations. Because fans of Grey’s, Scandal, and How to Get Away With Murder know showrunner Shonda Rhimes means business.

There Will Be Some “Hot” Romance
But hey, it seems like the finale won’t be all bad. Even if the hospital blows up (knock on wood), looks like we’re getting another kind of heat as well. Yep, we’re talking romance. Debbie Allen, who plays Catherine Avery, dropped a small hint during the actual panel: “The end of this season is hot,” she said. That could go in any sort of direction, considering all the “will they/won’t they” couples we have right now. We could see a hookup between April and Jackson, Amelia and Owen, and even possibly Alex and Jo!

Title: Baby Makes Four [Fanart]
Artist: @enchantressofllyr

Title: Lullaby for a Princess
Author: @witchpieceoftoast
Rating: Teen and Up
Warnings: No Archive Warnings Apply
Words: 20246
Summary:
“‘Baby in the woods, get to the hospital’ wasn’t the most informative message,” Emma says as soon as she sees Mulan pacing just outside the hospital doors.

“It got you here, didn’t it?” Mulan says. She hands Emma a coffee.

Emma rolls her eyes, but nods and accepts the coffee gratefully. Some kind of phone etiquette crash course will do the entire sheriff’s station good.

She takes a gulp of coffee and winces. She should have been expecting hospital coffee, since it’s early even for Granny to be preparing the diner for the morning.

“So, a baby?”

“Yup.”

An infant is found in the woods. The Swan-Mills home is the safest place for her, but Emma isn’t sure they’ll be able to let go once they find her family.


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Essays in Existentialism: Punches

Do you have a Clexa boxing fic? If not, prompt? Also your writing is terrific <3

Sore and still fuming, Lexa sat, stoic and agitated behind the blue curtain of the emergency room exam table. She did not move save to look at her knuckles and try to flex them despite the growing bruises and cuts. The pain made her wince, but she kept gingerly testing her hands. She swished the bit of spit around in her mouth, swallowing the blood and copper taste as something so familiar. 

“The doctor is going to be right in, Miss…” A deep voice accompanied the screeching of the curtain as it was pulled back. The cop licked his thumb and flipped through his notepad. 

“Woods,” Lexa offered, clenching her fist and letting her hands rest against her lap without a second thought. 

“I just have a few questions, if you think you can answer them.” 

“Alright.” Her head throbbed  and she tasted blood on her teeth but she agreed to get it over with as soon as she could. 

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Alone, Until I Get Home (11/?)

Summary: In Boston, Henry Swan’s six-year-old brother Ian finds a book titled “Once Upon a Time” hidden beneath the seat in their mom’s old yellow bug. As soon as Henry touches it, he remembers.

Season 3 Canon Divergence-Emma finds out she’s pregnant a few weeks after she and Henry leave Storybrooke with new memories and new lives. Nearly seven years later, another Dark Curse puts her family in danger, and Emma must return to Storybrooke to help them.

Who’s powerful enough to cast the Dark Curse? And how the hell is she going to tell Hook they have a son together?

Also on: AO3

Tagging: @el-kelpo @m98h @strawberrycupcakeprincess@crisanja @superchocovian @adeelam @andiirivera @cinnamonduckling @mez86 (let me know if you want on or off, or if you wanted on and I left you out on accident!!!)


Chapter 11

Hook says they’re all still technically alive, but they don’t look alive.

Nor do they look like they’re sleeping, or in a coma.

They look dead.

Emma’s seen death before, and this is it. Death is cold, gray skin, death is a slack face and limp limbs, death is not opening your eyes when someone’s shaking you and screaming your name in your ear.

Yet, when David rolls Robin off the pile of other bodies and presses his fingers to Robin’s neck, just below his jaw, he looks up at Emma and says, “He has a pulse.”

So, not dead.

But very close.

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