horse image

Lin-Manuel Miranda being charming af on the 2017 Olivier Awards red carpet (x)

What else have you learned about British culture since you’ve been here?

…You guys have Cadbury Creme Eggs like year round, and that makes me very happy because we only get ‘em around Easter.

How do you eat yours?

One fell swoop–like a snake eating a rat I eat my Cadbury Creme Eggs.

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Happy comicbooks Wednesday! I share with you a little proyect I have with my pal @danieruhuli, the anthropomorphization of our favorites comics publishing houses (and seals)! Hope you like it, and please make me know if you want us to design another one of your liking!

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Between Shadows There Is Light 

© Alexandra Meulemans Photography/All rights reserved

For the price list of purchasing limited edition fine art prints feel free to email me.

Healing with horses: creativeplenitude.com 

Some of the most talented women in comics, on Tumblr and beyond, are joining us for a special Women’s History Month Issue Time. 

ASK OUR PANELISTS A QUESTION!

Maytal Gilboa is the founder and CEO of Emet Comics, a publishing company focused on empowering female comic book creators. In 2016 Emet Comics acquired Fresh Romance, a romance comic anthology from publisher Rosy Press.  Fresh Romance Volume 2 is currently in production and being crowdfunded through Kickstarter.  Prior to starting her publishing company, Maytal spent 4 years working as an executive at animation house, ReelFX Creative Studios, where she worked on films such as The Book of Life, and Freebirds.  Emet’s latest webcomic is Zana.

Sally Jane Thompson is an artist and writer whose work includes comics from Oni, Dark Horse, Image, Oxford University Press, The Phoenix and more, as well as live art, sketch reportage and illustration. She drew The Ruby Equation (with Sarah Kuhn, Savanna Ganucheau and Steve Wands) for Fresh Romance Vol 1, and is returning to the series to both write and draw Under the Oak Trees.

Born and raised in Chicago, Ashley A. Woods is an illustrator who got her start through self-publishing her action-fantasy comic series, “Millennia War”. January 2015, she met Amandla Stenberg and Stranger Comics at a convention; six months later, she began working on “NIOBE: She Is Life” which went on to sell tens of thousands of copies and inspired many cosplays.

Afua Richardson [ pronounced Ah FOO wah ] is an award winning American Comic-book illustrator best known for her work on Marvel’s Black Panther World of Wakanda. Some of her other works include Wildstorm, Attack on Titan, X-men 92, Captain Marvel, All Star Batman to name a few. Afua is also a musician, voice actor, activist and mentor. As a recipient of the Nina Simone award, she is aptly called a Jane of All trades.

Suzana Harcum and Owen White of the webcomic Tripping Over You are a two-person comics team currently based in Arizona. They are a married lesbian couple who once flirted with each other by creating characters and drawing together, and continue to make LGBTQ positive comics today for the love of writing stories together.

Our panelists will start responding on Monday 27 March

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indian springs8-5120 - Copy by Jami Bollschweiler

beaureqard  asked:

you characterized human walking as controlled falling--does animal walking take more effort because they have 4 legs, they have to push off each one? what about the relative stresses of human vs animal running? is there an example of a well-muscled animal that doesnt have such trouble with fragility, or a social animal that can care for wounded members of its group? we've sort of gotten away from anthropology huh lmao Sorry! I guess... what pressures selected for the above in humans?

Actually, a lot of this is still anthropology! Bipedalism- one of the defining characteristics of hominins- and its origins are extremely important to physical anthropologists and primatologists.

Human walking is divided into two parts: stance phase and swing phase. As an experiment, stand up, take a slow walking step, and really think about what you’re doing. Then sit down again because things tend to get weird when you actually think about what you’re doing when you walk- it’s kind of like remembering to breathe or being aware that you can feel your tongue in your mouth. By and large as a species*, our brains are so used to the motions of walking that thinking about it can throw us off our stride. This is why learning to walk again after an injury can be so challenging- actively thinking about locomotion is not something the human brain likes to do. To walk, we pick up a leg, swing it forward, land on it, roll off the toe of the other leg, pick it up, swing forward, land on it… it goes on forever. Here’s an illustration of what that looks like!

This doesn’t actually require a lot of energy, from a caloric standpoint. It’s just falling with style. Running is quite similar; it’s just more energy put into it. It’s still the same motion; the leg just gets lifted a little higher. There’s a phase where both legs are off the ground (which you can’t see in this gif, unfortunately)- same as when a horse moves from walking to galloping. 

 Let’s compare that to a horse- the first gif is a horse walking, the second is a horse galloping.

Much of the stress in four-legged running comes from body weight; a horse is going to be a lot heavier than a human, so that’s a lot of force put on the knees. Running is always going to be more stressful than walking, but for humans, our relatively small body size is going to make it comparatively less stressful and more efficient.

Now, this isn’t to say that other animals aren’t efficient for what they are/can do; it’s just to say that we’re more efficient. There’s only two animals that can really keep up with us: domesticated dogs and domesticated horses. We’re going to keep looking at horses because horses and the energetics of their movement are really well-studied; horses have had a long working relationship with humans. Unlike most other animals, it’s unlikely we domesticated them just to eat- equines are real dynamos and are able to do a tremendous amount of work. Now, this is where things kind of get into physics, but bear with me for a moment. Consider for just a second: animals (us included) as machines. There’s an input: oxygen and calories. There’s an output that we call “work,” which is using a force to move an object a distance when both the force and the motion of the object are in the same direction. That’s what we mean when we’re talking about “work,” the ability to move an object (at bare minimum, the animal’s body) a distance. Horses have been selectively bred over millennia for stamina and speed, and as a result the domesticated horse’s maximum work output is about 3.5 times higher than what it should be**. So back to that question of two feet versus four feet: It’s not just about quadrupedalism versus bipedalism, but also about aerobic potential, lung capacity, metabolism… there’s a lot to it

Efficiency versus the capacity for speed is one of those evolutionary tradeoffs. There’s quite a lot of them in locomotion, including the fragility of various species. Horses and other leggy ungulates are typically more fragile than most other quadrupeds. If we look at predators- let’s use coyotes as an example- they might not be as fast initially as an ungulate, but they’ve also got some padding around their ankles. They’re less likely to shatter a bone. Bigger carnivores, like lions? Even more padding, with hunting strategies to match. Lions like to chase their prey into ambushes rather than just chase it down. To escape these ambushes, prey species need speed; like all things evolutionary, those fragile legs are a tradeoff. 

As far as social animals caring for wounded members of their group, you’ll sometimes see this in other primates- they’ll lick each others’ wounds, pick off debris, that sort of thing. There’s some evidence that they’ll chew plants with medicinal properties, but interpreting these actions is really difficult because there’s so much we don’t know about great apes’ cognition. There’s an excellent book, The Evolution of Sickness and Healing, that has loads of information. While it’s a little older- it was published in 1997- it’s a great jumping off point. The whole thing’s available for free online here. Chapter 2 in particular has a lot of good information on what chimpanzees have been observed doing, including one of my favorite Jane Goodall anecdotes about a 23-year-old male chimpanzee (so, an adult) who got hurt in a fight with another chimp and started screaming; his elderly mother came running from about half a kilometer away and started grooming him, which got him to calm down. Even for chimps, mom’s attention can make it all better. 


As always, footnotes and references/further reading under the jump!

Keep reading

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New Comic Book Day! My Pull List this week.

  • ‘The Wicked + The Divine 455AD’ (Image Comics)
  • ‘The Forever War’ #4 (Titan Comics)
  • 'Rose’ #2 (Image Comics)
  • 'Low’ #18 (Image Comics)
  • 'World Reader’ #2 (Aftershock Comics)
  • 'American Gods’ #3 (Dark Horse Comics)
  • 'The Greatest Adventure’ #2 (Dynamite Comics)
  • 'Star Wars’ #31 (Marvel Comics)
  • 'Star Wars: Poe Dameron’ #15 (Marvel Comics)
  • 'Red Sonja’ V4 #5 (Dynamite Comics)
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Shopping by Mark Mumford

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