horii

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Dragon Quest sketches vs completed designs ⊟

Whoa, this is neat. On the left in these images, you’ll see Dragon Quest’s original monster design sketches from series creator Yuji Horii. On the right, we have final artwork from character designer (and Dragon Ball series creator) Akira Toriyama. And I’ve dropped the monsters’ in-game sprites in the middle.

More comparisons on Cat Spirit’s blog (via Maroonant and GameSpite)!

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Square Enix keeps bringing up potential localizations for the Dragon Quest VII and VIII 3DS games ⊟ 

It started a couple days ago in an interview with French fansite Final Fantasy Ring, when series creator Yuji Horii commented on calls to bring the Dragon Quest VII and VIII’s 3DS remakes to the West. "We hear and read that a lot of fans are indeed passionate about these games, and we’re thinking about it,” he said, according to a machine translated transcript from Gematsu.

I didn’t think much of that non-committal statement, but then this odd thing happened at Paris’ Japan Expo during a Square Enix presentation:

“At the end of the DQ stage, Yuji Horii said ‘I want to announce one thing. I want to release Dragon Quest VII and VIII for 3DS in France!’, to which DQ producer Ryota Aomi replied: ‘Wait! There is no official announcement yet!’”

That comes from a Famitsu report translated by Zanasea. Yeah, I don’t know. Hope for the best, expect the worst (English versions released to iOS only).

The above photos of Japanese idol Rena Nōnen as a slime have nothing to do with the story. I’m just making up for us failing to post any of the promotional stuff she did for Dragon Quest Monsters Superlight last year.

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Developers behind SEGA's 3D Classics Collection are interested in porting SEGA Saturn & Dreamcast classics

#SEGA 3D Classics Collection devs are interested in porting #Saturn & #Dreamcast classics

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Many fans of SEGA’s 3D Classic’s Collection praise the attention to detail and love that was put into these projects. Following the release of these 2D classics, SEGA fans are salivating at the thought of 3D classics from the SEGA Saturn and Dreamcast eras. Sega’s Yosuke Okunari gives an interesting response as to why we have not gotten these 3D classics yet. “This has more to do with how the…

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4

Still Image from “Itazura na Kiss 2~Love in Tokyo”

2013 Japan dorama that has gained massive popularity in Asia is back with 2nd season. Irie Naoki and Aihara Kotoko, or Irie Kotoko now, return with new story about their blooming relationship. After their honeymoon in Okinawa (watch it on Itazura na Kiss~Love in Okinawa), Together, they start their newlywed life and adapted to it little by little. Naoki begin to pursue his dream as a doctor while Kotoko decided her dream as nurse. This season not only offers romantic comedy drama but also joy and sadness story of a family. There are also new characters who comes and spice up their journey. In spite of Naoki’s weakness on expressing his feelings, this season there will be many kiss and love scene. Naoki also meets with his rival, Kamogari Keita, who fall in love with Kotoko. Naoki confused about this emotions that he never felt before. For the first time he’s going to face jealousy. Meanwhile Ikezawa Kinnosuke who has been devoted to Kotoko, would meet Christine Robbins and falls in love at the first sight with him. Kinnosuke turns out to be clumsy in love like Naoki, but gradually approach her.

 Itazura na Kiss 2~Love in Tokyo start airing on 24th November 2014 at Fuji TV.

posted by ND@JDoramaID

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RISD Foundations Class: Spatial Design with Ken Horii

Assignment: Create a modular unit that, when used in groups of at least 6, can create three different chair like configurations. This project continues for roughly six weeks, thus requiring your preliminary modular unit to be further developed 6 times. Something like that. It becomes a blur after a few sleepless nights. With each development, you must create at least six copies of each after a certain point.

Unfortunately, I don’t have pictures of all of my prototypes, and I reused a lot of the previous ones to develop the next ones. However, I can tell you that this modular unit went through a lot of different transformations. It was once a square with three different levels falling from it. At another point it was hollow and small. Then, it became larger, but in its hollow state it could not support any weight. Thus, an accordion was introduced. With this addition, came an opportunity for portability via compression. It was able to fold down to half its size, with the accordion-like parts being able to be compressed and packed in with flaps and tabs. However, it was impractical as it took far too long to make, costed too much, gave way to error to easily, and was not worth it for the fact that its compressed form did not actually give way to more configurations, but became a burden given its weight when compressed into a denser form. And so, the accordion remained for support, but in a permanent open state. In said state, a single modular unit supports at least 200 pounds.

The final connections relied on nesting and tabs, with even the large to and bottoms square surfaces being able to disconnect from their slots and become larger tabs themselves, thus being sandwiched between another large slot and the accordion-like center. The tension and friction of this connection was particularly strong and thus made things like full backrests and two person couches possible. Although tedious, i wanted these tabs and slots so i would have as many possibilities for connections as possible so that I could explore the form itself when I went to configure my chairs.

Thus, we are brought to the use of ratios. There was also a lot of play with ratios here. Every measurement was either in whole, third, or half units so that things would fit well both functionally and aesthetically when configured into a chair.

Also, I put a lot of blood and love into this so hording was inevitable.


Photo Credits: Sara Dunn, Olivia Stephens, Caitlin Walker.