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REQUEST (ANON)Will you please do Steve x Reader smut involving muscle worship like biting his bicep or some thing like that? Or maybe this has been written before would you rec these kind of fic? I love muscular men Jesus help me . 

I personally don’t know any other fics like this , but I hope someone can help you out . I hope you like this nonnie. 

A/N - Thank you Taw @supersoldierslover so much .I love you .

Also I decided to jump on the A/B/O bandwagon with this one-shot because why the fuck not. I love reading them and this is my extremely poor attempt at writing it. But I still hope you like it.

WORDS - 2.2K

WARNING- Smut, oral (mr/fr) , vaginal sex.NSFW GIFS (that’s it I guess. If I missed anything , feel free to tell me , I will add it.)

Originally posted by perfectfeelings

“Urghhh ,Hrmph ….” The sounds of grunts and groans , thudding of the punching bag and clinking of the machines filled the gym . Everyone watching from the sidelines as Steve tried to relieve his frustration. Every omega that tried to walk towards him he’d just hiss and scare them  away . It was a little comical to you . To see Steve who was usually the most calm , just going through tens of punching bags , sweat dripping from his face and his perfectly toned abs , down his juicy thighs.

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This is finally ready! Since some of you asked me how I obtained this result, I made a short tutorial for you. 

Since my hair is so thick, I struggled with finding a method that would work on me. You’re not going to see anything new. I’ve just selected various tips from other videos and came up with a method that suits me.

The result is pretty good. I’ve actually achieved even better ones on different occasions. It’s just a matter of practice. In the end, you’ll see you can still see some orange coming through, but that can easily be fixed by using a natural skin colour concealer on top of the orange one, or instead of that.

I hope this helps someone. If you have any questions, feel free to ask.

I apologise for my English and my voice shaking, I was nervous!  

If you’re ever asked by a straight person who is your celebrity crush but you’re not out and your brain decides to take a vacation on lesbian island and you can’t come up with the name of a single man that was ever famous just say Chris. The other person will immediately say the Chris of their choice amongst the 50 that are famous and you just agree with them.

Things they don’t tell you about top surgery

- Talk to the surgeon about the size you want your new areolas/nipples (don’t be afraid to ask)

- Numbness. No one talks about this for guys who are about to have surgery. You’re going to be numb all in your chest area, especially where the incisions were. They cut nerves as they pass along your chest, and it can take up to a year to regenerate those nerves. Still, feels super foreign for the first two weeks

- Make your bed into a pillow chair, body pillow, two on each side, and two for your head. 

- Sleep alone. I tried to sleep with my girlfriend and it was miserable. You really do need the entire bed for yourself

- Go on Groupon, & get yourself a 10 foot lightning cable iPhone charger, BEST THING EVER, can reach from wherever you are

- Don’t take a week off from work, take two. You will regret the one week, and love the extra time

- When they say “don’t move too much, even after the first week”. LISTEN. I moved way too much and got so sore super quickly. 

- Drink lots of water & eat if your taking the pain medication, otherwise your stomach feels super funky.

- Get stool softeners, & don’t be afraid to take those babies. Don’t wait a week to poop. you’ll surely regret it. 

- The drains are scary & they may hurt while draining or rewrapping your dressings, but once they come out, the second they do, its no more pain, its crazy. 

i hope this helps someone, because i wish i knew all of this when i was having mine a month ago. Looking back its like everyone forgets all the real negatives, its a great experience, & i healed very well & quick compared to most, but the first few days are crazy. They hurt, suck but it gets better. 

when your friend/loved one is dissociating

how to tell if they are dissociating

- non-focused, “zoned out”
- doesnt reply to comments, or replies very half-heartedly
- eyes arent focused
- doesnt seem to notice anything going on around them
- repeats doing or saying the same things over and over
- forgets what they said or did, whether in the last few minutes or the last few days

things you can do to help

- get them to a quiet, calm place
- ask them very basic questions: “are you okay?” “how are you feeling?” “is there anything you need from me right now?”
- help them recount the events theyve forgotten, whether in the last few minutes or last few weeks
- walk them through what is going on, tell them, if you can, that you think that theyre dissociating
- if you can, keep an eye on them and look out for things they might miss, ie: crossing the street, accidentally bumping into something, receiving important information
- sometimes showing them funny stuff or having them read an article or something after doing the previous steps helps

keep in mind that i am not a doctor or professionally qualified to help with mental illness. i just wrote down a list of what i like to have people do when i dissociate. hope this helps someone!

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Drawing Faces From Any Angle by sinixdesign

Things People Don’t Tell You about Pet Birds

Here’s a list of things nobody told me before I got my bird.  You’re welcome to fact check and add your own experiences!  I hope this helps someone!

Possibly disturbing images of animal neglect below.

NEVER get a pet bird who lives alone a mirror for their cage.  They can choose their own reflection as a mate, which needless to say isn’t healthy and can be extremely sexually frustrating.  It’s much healthier to get even small birds foraging toys to entertain them.

BAD!

GOOD!

ALL birds need lots of social interaction if they’re going to remain mentally healthy!  This is especially important for birds that live in large groups in the wild like cockatoos, finches, and parakeets, but also true for “loner” birds like Senegals and African Greys.  Without the proper social interactions (hours a day with people or other birds) birds can get bored and pick up destructive habits like feather pulling, biting, and screaming, and even develop mental illnesses like depression or anxiety.  Yes, even parakeets.

Feather pulling removes a bird’s main way of staying warm, which can lead to life threatening things like hypothermia.

Parrot’s body temperatures are around 103 degrees Fahrenheit, much higher than humans, and largely thermoregulate through their feet.  Because of that and their small body size, they can get hyper or hypothermia fairly easily when compared to humans.  In hot months it’s important to provide them with a shallow dish of water they can cool off in, and in cold months, a heating pad or perch they can sit on to keep warm.  Parrots do best in a stable, relatively warm environment; while they can take slight changes, drastic changes in temperature can be very detrimental. Non-tropical/arid birds are a bit different from what I hear, so can’t really talk about them.

Parrot beaks constantly grow, so it’s important to provide lots of chewing fodder (I like to call them sacrifices) for your parrot to chew on or get their beaks trimmed by a professional.  

These can be hard calcium treats, wood, and other natural materials.  Some can be plastic but I wouldn’t recommend those as they can be swallowed and impede digestion or become a choking hazard.

Birds are prey animals!  They’re typically very nervous because they’ve been hardwired for centuries to be on the lookout for things that want to eat them.  They’ll get nervous around new things, strange noises, and new people.  They can learn to overcome some fears by careful desensitization, lots of social interaction, and a calm, careful owner.  It’s VERY important to keep them away from predatory animals (dogs, cats, etc.), as it can cause unnecessary stress on the animals.  If they absolutely have to interact, do so in a controlled environment and with one or both in separate carriers, cages, or pens.  Know your animals, pay careful attention to their body language, and be prepared to step in if either looks stressed or aggressive.

My parrot Apollo meeting my friend’s cat, the right way.

Just like humans, birds have dietary needs that must be met if they’re to remain healthy.  A few of the most important are Vitamin D (sunlight!), calcium (especially important in hens), and protein (required to grow healthy beaks, claws, and feathers).  The easiest ways to take care of the first two is to provide your bird with lots of sunlight (direct or indirect depends on the bird) and a constant supply of cuttlebones or calcium treats.  There are several different diet plans out there for all kinds of birds, but all agree that birds CANNOT live off nothing but seeds.  This can cause fatty liver disease and early death, even in otherwise healthy birds.  All parrots are usually fed a diet of pellets, fruits, and vegetables, but the ratios really depend on who you ask.

Here’s a few food pyramids for parrots:

Birds absolutely CANNOT be fed:

  • Avocados
  • Caffeine
  • Chocolate
  • Any greasy, salty chips/popcorn or any processed “human food” 
  • Dairy
  • Alcohol (I shouldn’t have to say this)
  • Apple seeds
  • Feel free to add on

Before you feed your bird ANYTHING, please look it up and make sure it’s safe!

anonymous asked:

i know you meant well when you said 30 isnt ancient, but im nb so my life expectancy is actually 30 :(

Hey anon, I’m so sorry that that’s a fear you’ve had to live with. I know that trans people are at greater risk of violence and suicide, and I’ve heard people say many times that the life expectancy of trans people (or trans women, or trans women of color, depending on who you ask) is anywhere from 23 to 35. Your ask troubled me, so I’ve dug deep looking for solid evidence of any of these, and I don’t believe that these statistics are true.

A trans woman, Helen, looked into the “23 years” claim and traced it back to someone’s notes on two workshops at a 2007 conference, which stated that trans people’s life expectancy is “believed to be around 23” (emphasis mine) but cites no actual source. This claim has been presented as fact in many news articles since then, but as far as I can tell, no one seems to know where this figure came from.

Another claim is often sourced to an Argentine psychologist quoted in this NPR article

Psychologist Graciela Balestra, who works closely with the transgender community, says it’s an especially vulnerable population.

“Transgender people have an average life expectancy of about 30 to 32 years,” Balestra says. “They don’t live any longer; I think that statistic alone says so much.”

But again, the article gives no source for this figure

I found an article claiming that a 2014 report by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) “concludes the average life expectancy of trans people in the Western Hemisphere is between 30-35 years.” However, when I tracked down the report, An Overview of Violence Against LGBTI Persons (pdf), its only reference to this is (emphasis mine): “[T]he IACHR has received information that the life expectancy of trans women in the Americas is between 30 and 35 years of age.” Again, this is no source.

Someone said on my post that these statistics may have come from the NCTE/NGLTF report Injustice at Every Turn (pdf), but I can’t find any reference to any such claim in the report.

Thinking about these claims, they seem unlikely for some basic reasons. Consider that we simply don’t have a long enough span of data on trans people, and that what data we do have is extremely limited because we can’t always know who is trans and who isn’t. Consider also that, although obviously the murder rates for trans people are extremely high, the number of deaths of 20-something trans people would have to be ENORMOUS to offset the existence of older trans people and bring the average down to 30. Especially since, unlike with racial groups for example, the data on trans people would likely include almost no childhood deaths, simply because it would be much more difficult (and in many cases impossible) to identify these children as trans. And since we know that trans women of color are extremely disproportionately affected by violence, statistics that include white people and/or trans men would be especially unlikely to be so low.

And as to your specific situation anon, again given that trans women of color are most at risk, I don’t think we have reason to believe that being non-binary specifically puts a person at anywhere near this level of increased risk of dying young.

I don’t say any of this to question anyone’s experiences or to deny the state of emergency that trans women face with regard to violence. That is very real. But I think it can be harmful, even dangerous to trans people to spread claims like this around, especially without evidence. Expecting to die by 30 would take an extreme emotional toll on anyone, and trans people deserve better.

But don’t take my word for it: FORGE, a national transgender anti-violence organization that works with trans survivors of sexual assault, wrote the following in its 2016 publication “First Do No Harm: 8 Tips for Addressing Violence Against Transgender and Gender Non-Binary People” (pdf) (I have moved two footnotes into the main text and provided links to some endnote sources; italicized emphasis is theirs while bold is mine.): 

Promote Hope for the Future

It certainly is not the same as a murder, but publicizing a low “life expectancy” rate for transwomen of color is another way to steal away their future, a “crime” that has been committed repeatedly by trans, LGBQ, and mainstream press. Think about the people you know or have heard of who have been diagnosed with a fatal illness and given a short time to live: how many of them have enrolled in college, undertaken lengthy training for a new occupation, had a new child, or tried to establish a new non-profit? A few do, certainly, but many more focus on their bucket list, arrange for their good-byes, or simply give up entirely, essentially relinquishing whatever time they have left to depression and regrets. When we tell transwomen of color they cannot expect to live very long, we rob them of hope. We rob them of any motivation to invest in themselves, their relationships, and their communities. We rob them, in short, of their lives even while they are still living. (This statement in no way negates the need to systemically work to improve and increase the life expectancy of trans people through working to end transphobia, racism, poverty, pervasive violence, and health and healthcare inequities, and more.)

One trans woman of color was trying to come to grips with an estimated lifespan figure more than ten years shorter than the one that has been published most often. (We are not repeating any of the (incorrect) estimated lifetime figures that are circulating, to avoid even inadvertent reinforcement.) Faced with the report of yet another attack on another trans woman, she wrote:

These days, I look at the latest reports of stabbed, shot, beaten trans women, search myself for tears, and I cannot find a thing. I want to mourn and rage. I want to honor all of our sisters — the hundreds each year who are ripped, namelessly and without fanfare, from this life — who are taken so young before their time. But the grief and anger — even empathy — do not come. I don’t feel anything but numbness and fatigue, and somewhere far below that, fear.

The terrible irony of the life expectancy “fact” is that it is based on an impossibility. The only ways to determine a given population’s life expectancy are to: examine decades or more of death certificates or census data containing the information being studied, or follow a specific set of individuals for around 100 years and record every single death. There is not and never has been a census of transgender people. Our death certificates do not mark us as transgender. There has been no 100-year-long study of a representative group of trans people. So where are the estimated lifespan figures coming from?

FORGE tracked the most commonly-cited figure back to what was most likely the 2014 Philadelphia Transgender Health Conference, where a workshop presenter gave the figure and explained she had calculated it by averaging the age of death for all of those listed on the Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDOR) website. This means the figure is actually the average age of those trans people who were both murdered and came to the attention of someone who added them to the TDOR list. Interestingly, this average is very close to the average age of everyone who is murdered in the U.S., according to the U.S. Department of Justice statistics. [I’m not seeing an average age given in the cited source but you can see on page 5 of this Bureau of Justice Statistics report (pdf) that the average age of homicide victims in the U.S. was between 30 and 35 from 1980 to 2008.]

But not everyone is murdered.

Despite how many there may appear to be, only a tiny, tiny fraction of transpeople are killed by other people. Most of us, transwomen of color included, live average lifespans and die of the most common U.S. killers — heart disease, cancer, chronic lower respiratory disease, and unintentional injuries (accidents).

Please don’t add to fear and hopelessness by spreading inaccurate and profoundly disempowering data.

Since I can’t respond to everyone directly, I’m @ing some people who’ve brought this up on my post and may be interested: (urls removed after posting for their privacy). I appreciate your thoughtfulness in bringing this to my attention. If you or anyone else has a source on any of these figures that can provide specific methodology, I’d be very grateful to see that.

In closing, here are some resources that provide a more hopeful view of trans aging. They are well known but I hope they will be helpful to someone.

“jews don’t want us to call hux a nazi.”

I see a surprising amount of goyim (gentiles, non-Jewish people) saying this, and I don’t know who they’ve spoken to, but here are my thoughts.

It is absolutely okay for Jews to feel uncomfortable saying Hux is a Nazi. Nazis in real life are dangerous and harmful, and some feel it might be trivializing the word to use it on fictional characters who merely mirror Nazis. 

This is why we call Hux a ‘Nazi parallel.’ Hux is meant to evoke Nazi imagery and ideas, and that’s a fact that is true regardless of comfort level with the terms “Nazi” or “Space Nazi” or whatever else.

Personally, I used to be very uncomfortable with just calling Hux a Nazi. I was also worried about trivializing the word, and I still think people with that concern have a legitimate point.

However, I’ve seen people twist the words I said way back when we were talking about this issue to say that Jews just can’t stand us saying Hux is a Nazi– He’s just a fascist! He’s just your average villain! He’s just a child who was abused and deserves pity (?!?).

That’s why I now just call Hux a Nazi outright. I don’t mind if people are uncomfortable with that or like to call him something else– I’d definitely recommend gentiles say “Nazi parallel” over “Space Nazi”, especially if they’re uncomfortable with just calling him a Nazi.

Hux is a Nazi parallel. This is the truth, and this is not what is going to hurt Jews. You do not have to use the word “Nazi” on its own if you would rather not, and you don’t have to use that word anywhere near Hux if you don’t want to– but you have to acknowledge reality.

Please stop responding to criticisms of fandom’s anti-Semitism and increasing ability to humanize/romanticize Nazi parallels with “but Jews don’t want us to call him a Nazi!”

Yes, some Jews don’t want you to call Hux a Nazi. Those Jews have a great point and I have no problem with that. But Hux is still a Nazi parallel, and no amount of semantics discourse is going to change that.


I highly recommend reblogging this post if you’re in the SW fandom, Jewish or gentile. It’s very important to any discussion of Hux’s character, and I’m tired of the same old excuses getting in the way.

How to other eye

ALRIGHT, so, I know a lot of people have trouble making eyes match. Yesterday I found out a way to make it significantly easier! Here’s a small guide.

Well, first of all, you have your face. mark where the eyes should be on it.

Then mark the corners of the eyes and go over the middle again, to make the next step easier

Alright, I know it sounds a bit crazy, but draw this shape, trying to make it as symmetrical as you can.

Draw the eyes using that shape as a guide and TA-DA! They match! For different eye shapes you tweak the angle of the two guide lines.

And it also helps with angles where the size and shape of the eye is distorted, you just put it in perspective.

I think the theory behind it is that the thing that makes it hard to make the eyes match is the angle of the corners, and this type of guideline helps make them even, which makes the eyes look symmetrical. Welp, here it is! I hope it helps someone!

How to be good at interviews:

I’m having next Wednesday my first professional interview (eeeeek) so I decided to share the research I’m doing. I googled all of this and chose the information I found most important, and organized it. I truly hope it’s helpful for someone out there :)

PLAN AND PRACTICE:

  • always do your homework: learn about the organization, its ideas and story 
  • don’t necessarily memorize responses, but try to have a planned general strategy for answering common interview questions
  • practice in front of the mirror
  • be ready to briefly describe related experience
  • compare your qualifications to what the organization wants from you

COMMON INTERVIEW QUESTIONS:

  1. What’s your biggest weakness? Think of a genuine issue you have as well as ways you have managed to work with/around it.
  2. What’s your biggest strengths?” Stand out from the crowd and don’t be afraid to speak about your strengths in an authentic and compelling way. See if your strengths align with the company’s needs.
  3. Why do you want this job?”/ “Why should we hire you?” Stay focused on why your background makes you an ideal candidate and tell them how you are going to contribute to that department and that company. 
  4. Tell me about yourself.” Don’t tell them your life story, instead discuss what your interests are relating to the job and why your background makes you a great candidate.
  5. Why did you leave your last job/position/school?” Do not go into details about your dissatisfaction, tell them that while you valued the experience and education you received, you felt that the time had come to seek outo a new opportunity, expand your skills and knowledge, and to find a company with wich you could grow. Try to put a positive spin on things. Be honest if you were fired but don’t trash your previous boss.
  6. Where do you see yourself in five years?”  Be honest about what your greater aspirations are.

And much much much more (from your behaviour to work experiences, education, interests and motivation or problems and challeges you’ve faced previously), I would encourage you to try to write down some topics for each questions that work for you. Being prepared is everything.

THE DAY OF THE INTERVIEW:

  • sleep and eat well so you look rested and healthy on the big day
  • give yourself time to calm down/meditate/relax
  • don’t noodle around on your phone or electronic device while waiting - it may communicate boredom and frivolousness, maybe stick your notebook/notes

What to wear: normally it’s best to dress neutral, professionally/formal, not overly fashionable or trendy, and brightly colored clothing is bad. Make sure your clothes are neat and wrinkle free, and make sure your image is very clean and neat.

What to bring: if revelant, extra copies of your resume on quality paper, a notepad or professional binder and pen, information you might need to complete an application.

IMPORTANT TIPS:

  • make eye contact
  • show courtesy to everyone during the interview, this means everyone from the reception staff to the interviewer herself
  • smile
  • have good posture
  • avoid fidgeting too much or playing with your hair/touching face
  • have a good handshake
  • don’t cross your arms over your chest
  • walk, act, talk with confidence
  • be comfortable and relaxed
  • choose the words you say
  • don’t place stuff on their desk
  • manage your reactions - facial and body expressions give clues on how you feel: project a positive image
  • show interest and enthusiasm
  • show warmth and personality - being personable is about getting the interviewer’s emotional side to like you and believe in you
  • don’t lie to make it seem like you know something you don’t. You probably won’t fool your interviewer, and admitting to not know something is much more impressive than lying
  • be honest
  • keep things simple and short, talk in 30-90 second chunks. Any less and you’re likely to seem unqualified; any more and your interviewer is likely to lose interest in what you’re saying

THINK OF QUESTIONS TO ASK: participating actively during the interview gives a good impression of your level of interest in the job. Most of times it is more adequeate to ask in the end of the interview.  But I feel like you really need to make sure your questions are adequate. Examples:

  • “What types of training opportunities do you offer?”
  • “What are the chances for professional growth in this job opportunity?”
  • “Is there anything else I can provide you with that would be helpful?”
  • ALWAYS ask the “ When can I expect to hear back from you about the position?” question if  the interviewer does not tell you

Good questions are open-ended, and thus cannot be answered with a “yes” or “no.” Better questions are behavioral: they ask how things are done or have happened in the past, because current and past behavior is the best predictor of future behavior.

AFTER THE INTERVIEW:

  • shake hands with the interviewer - try to invest some feeling into the handshake and pleasantries, even if you think you bombed the interview
  • hold your head high and keep your cool
  • your emotions are probably teetering at the highest of highs or the lowest of lows, but try to stay measured
  • project a cool confidence, not cockiness, and walk out of the interview with your head held high

SOMETHING TO ALWAYS KEEP IN MIND:

  • when you know in your heart and your gut that you bring to the table something just as valuable as a paycheck and maybe much more – your tremendous experience, intellect and instinct – you’ll carry yourself differently. You won’t trip over your words in an effort to please His Majesty or Her Highness, because you’ll see yourself and the interviewer as equals on a level playing field. 
  • you are valuable and unique. You have something very special in you and you deserve to be given a chance. good luck!
Shower Dysphoria Tips

Okay, this is about to be a long list but I hope it helps someone.  Being genderfluid myself, I just showered for the first time in several days because of my disabling dysphoria.  I always see tons of tips about clothing, hair, behavior, and even makeup, but I don’t see a lot of tips on here about dealing with shower dysphoria.  Some of this is going to be aimed at trans*, genderfluid, and genderqueer individuals specifically, and some of these tips are for agender and other nonbinary individuals, but most can be applied to all of the above.  Let’s get started!

- If possible, listen to music.  Whether it’s on a phone, laptop, or portable radio, listen to music you enjoy, and listen to it as loudly as you’re able.  It helps me to have something else to focus on while I go through the motions of showering, even if it’s my own horrible singing.

- Use shower products marketed towards the gender you identify with. Since I’m genderfluid, I keep both “male” and “female” bodywashes, shampoos, and face washes in my shower so that however I’m feeling, I’ve got the products available to reduce dysphoria as much as I’m able.

- Have your clothes ready inside the bathroom with you. I always make sure that my clothes are completely prepared for me to throw them on as quickly as possible after my shower.  My dysphoria is increased significantly when I’m undressed, so not wasting time turning my clothes right-side out, or searching for clothes helps.

- Keep a mental list of the steps you need to complete during your shower.  1. Prepare clothes 2. Turn on water 3. Get in shower 4. Shampoo hair; ect. Having a mental list of specific steps you need to complete helps break the process down so it isn’t so overwhelming, and you’ll be able to keep track of how close you are to being done.

- Use genderless shower products.  Unfortunately, it’s pretty hard to find shampoos and body wash that aren’t marketed a specific way.  The best brand that I’ve found is Lush products.  Almost all of their products aren’t targeted to any gender at all.  Unfortunately, if you don’t live close to a store (the closest one to me is over two hours away) it can get pricey buying online once shipping and taxes are applied.   One that has been suggested a couple times is Trader Joe’s brand, but I’ve been told it mainly pertains to the west coast. Also, a more widespread brand is Head and Shoulders! If anyone knows of any more common, genderless brands, feel free to add on or message me and I’ll edit it in!

Unfortunately, for those of us with dysphoria, showering is probably always going to suck at least a little bit. If anyone else has helpful tips, feel free to reblog with your additions.  If you’re not comfortable with that, message me on here and I can edit it in.

Above all, just remember that:

Your dysphoria does not define who you are.

You are valid.

You are loved.

Are you interested in watching Adventure Time, but intimidated by the thought of watching 252 episodes? Have you watched the series before, but want to watch again without any filler episodes (unless it’s Bubbline, of course)? This is for you!

After seeing a request in the ATimers tag, I have compiled a list of all the Adventure Time episodes that contain major plot, important backstory, major characterization, and/or Bubbline moments. I have also included optional episodes that I think will increase your understanding/enjoyment of the show (I put the reason next to it; if it says something about being an arc, backstory, characterization, etc., be warned that not watching may make the major plot points of the show a bit more confusing for you). 

I condensed the show down to 128 of the 10-minute episodes (69 episodes if you don’t watch any of the optional episodes). Optional episodes are in italics. Episodes with Bubbline moments, characterization of Marcy/Princess Bubblegum (PB), or major backstory/plot related to Marcy/PB are in bold. Anything with a an asterisk (*) can be watched at any time (order doesn’t matter, though you may still want to watch it in the same season). 

I hope this helps someone out since I spent three hours putting it together! Without further ado… 

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