hope is like a bird

2

Why don’t i like using plastic containers for caged birds?
I hope the picture comparison is an obvious reason why.

As you can tell from the picture on the left, there is a clear, clean surface on the plastic. This is a new container.

The picture on the right shows a lining that makes the plastic container look cloudy, and have a whitish tinge called bio film.
This container is roughly 4 months old.
That lining is a major health hazard for your bird as it is full of bacterial growth.
Even after scrubbing and cleaning once daily, the bacteria still grows over time and can cause upsets with digestion as the bacteria enters from the water/food into the body causing a bacteria infection and most likely a trip to the vet.

Plastic surfaces are porous, a breeding ground trapping bacteria.
To keep a plastic container clean, soaking and through scrubbing in soapy hot water is the only way. Keeping them clean is certainly a challenge and don’t forget about getting those tight corners with a toothbrush.

This reason is why stainless steel and ceramic bowls are a better option for use as food containers - they are non porous.

Lou with his ceramic bowl

Louie has a cermaic bowl designed to hang in bird cages.
Providing the cage is spotless and clean enough to eat from the floor, you can use weighted ceramic bowls via placing them on ground level in a ‘no poop’ zone.
Placing a ‘dipping’ dish with water next to food will save your bird from climbing up and down to a from the water bowl.

Stainless steel bowls

Stainless steel bowls can come in hanging, screw on, or screw on coup holders.

*Important to note with metal bowls*
Do not use galvanised metal bowls as they are coated with zinc to provide a damage proof layer.
Zinc and Copper are heavy metal.
Heavy metals are toxic to birds

If they chew parts of metal cage wires, toys, bowls (even coins) made out of these materials, and the metal doesn’t pass throught the digestive tracts, the chewed pieces sit in their stomach toxins will leech in to the body.

Whatever you decide about which dishes you will use, before you give food or water to your birds, ask yourself, “Would I eat from this dish?”

Funny Quotes on Music

From cmuse.org. Enjoy!

  1. “A composer is a guy who goes around forcing his will on unsuspecting air molecules, often with the assistance of unsuspecting musicians. — Frank Zappa
  2. “I want to do a musical movie. Like Evita, but with good music.” — Elton John
  3. “Music is moonlight in the gloomy night of life.” — Jean Paul
  4. “Talking about music is like dancing about architecture.” — Steve Martin
  5. “A gentleman is someone who can play the accordion, but doesn’t.” — Tom Waits
  6. “I don’t deserve a Songwriters Hall of Fame Award. But fifteen years ago, I had a brain operation and I didn’t deserve that, either. So I’ll keep it.” — Quincy Jones
  7. “The musician is perhaps the most modest of animals, but he is also the proudest. It is he who invented the sublime art of ruining poetry.” — Erik Satie
  8. “All the good music has already been written by people with wigs and stuff.” — Frank Zappa
  9. “To achieve great things, two things are needed: a plan and not quite enough time.” — Leonard Bernstein
  10. “I’ve been imitated so well I’ve heard people copy my mistakes.” — Jimi Hendrix
  11. “My personal hobbies are reading, listening to music, and silence.” — Edith Sitwell
  12. “I can’t listen to that much Wagner. I start getting the urge to conquer Poland.” — Woody Allen
  13. “Life can’t be all bad when for ten dollars you can buy all the Beethoven sonatas and listen to them for ten years.” — William F. Buckley, Jr.
  14. “Beethoven’s last quartets were written by a deaf man and should only be listened to by a deaf man.” — Thomas Beecham
  15. “The world must be filled with unsuccessful musical careers like mine, and it’s probably a good thing. We don’t need a lot of bad musicians filling the air with unnecessary sounds. Some of the professionals are bad enough.” — Andy Rooney
  16. “Andrew Lloyd Webber’s music is everywhere, but so is AIDS.” — Malcolm Williamson
  17. “All music is folk music. I ain’t never heard a horse sing a song.” — Louis Armstrong
  18. “Money doesn’t talk, it swears.” ― Bob Dylan
  19. “Competitions are for horses, not artists.” — Bela Bartok
  20. “When an instrument fails on stage it mocks you and must be destroyed!” ― Trent Reznor
  21. “I never had much interest in the piano until I realized that every time I played, a girl would appear on the piano bench to my left and another to my right.” — Duke Ellington
  22. “Let me be clear about this: I don’t have a drug problem, I have a police problem.” — Keith Richards
  23. “When I was a little boy, I told my dad, ‘When I grow up, I want to be a musician.’ My dad said: ‘You can’t do both, Son.” — Chet Atkins
  24. “I don’t like country music, but I don’t mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means ‘put down’.”— Bob Newhart
  25. “Music makes one feel so romantic – at least it always gets on one’s nerves – which is the same thing nowadays.” —Oscar Wilde
  26. “I know [canned music] makes chickens lay more eggs and factory workers produce more. But how much more can they get out of you on an elevator?” — Victor Borge
  27. “It’s easy to play any musical instrument: all you have to do is touch the right key at the right time and the instrument will play itself.” — Johann Sebastian Bach
  28. “Rock ‘n’ roll will never die. There’ll always be some arrogant little brat who wants to make music with a guitar.” — Dave Edmunds
  29. “I stole everything I ever heard, but mostly I stole from the horns.” — Ella Fitzgerald
  30. “Get up from that piano. You hurtin’ its feelings.” — Jelly Roll Morton
  31. “To listen is an effort, and just to hear is no merit. A duck hears also.” — Igor Stravinsky
  32. “To get your playing more forceful, hit the drums harder.” — Keith Moon
  33. “Music expresses that which cannot be put into words.” — Victor Hugo
  34. “Jazz will endure just as long people hear it through their feet instead of their brains.” — John Philip Sousa
  35. “We consider that any man who can fiddle all through one of those Virginia Reels without losing his grip may be depended upon in any kind of musical emergency.” — Mark Twain
  36. “Sometimes we pee on each other before we go on stage.” — Trent Reznor
  37. “Dogs smoke in France. “— Ozzy Osbourne
  38. “Music was my refuge. I could crawl into the space between the notes and curl my back to loneliness.” — Maya Angelou
  39. “Nothing soothes me more after a long and maddening course of pianoforte recitals than to sit and have my teeth drilled.” — George Bernard Shaw
  40. “In order to compose, all you need to do is remember a tune that nobody else has thought of.” — Robert Schumann
  41. “I think John would have liked Free As A Bird. In fact, I hope somebody does this to all my crap demos when I’m dead, making them into hit songs.” — George Harrison
  42. “Nothing separates the generations more than music. By the time a child is eight or nine, he has developed a passion for his own music that is even stronger than his passions for procrastination and weird clothes.” — Bill Cosby
  43. “One good thing about music, when it hits you, you feel no pain.” — Bob Marley
  44. “The piano has been drinking, not me.” — Tom Waits
  45. “Classical music is the kind we keep thinking will turn into a tune.” — Kin Hubbard
  46. “There are some experiences in life which should not be demanded twice from any man, and one of them is listening to the Brahms Requiem.” — George Bernard Shaw
  47. “Wagner’s music is better than it sounds.” — Mark Twain
  48. “In the end we’re all Jerry Springer Show guests, really, we just haven’t been on the show.” — Marilyn Manson
  49. “Rock journalism is people who can’t write interviewing people who can’t talk in order to provide articles for people who can’t read.” — Frank Zappa
  50. “Too many pieces of music finish too long after the end.” — Igor Stravinsky
  51. “There are two golden rules for an orchestra: start together and finish together. The public doesn’t give a damn what goes on in between.” — Thomas Beecham
  52. “Lesser artists borrow, great artists steal.” — Igor Stravinsky
  53. “There’s nothing like the eureka moment of knocking off a song that didn’t exist before – I won’t compare it to sex, but it lasts longer.” — Paul McCartney
  54. “Do I listen to pop music because I’m miserable or am I miserable because listen to pop music?” — John Cusack
  55. “Last night at Carnegie Hall, Jack Benny played Mendelssohn. Mendelssohn lost.” — Harold C. Schonberg
  56. “Beethoven always sounds to me like the upsetting of a bag of nails, with here and there an also dropped hammer.” — John Ruskin
  57. “And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music.” — Friedrich Nietzsche
  58. “I smash guitars because I like them.” — Pete Townshend
  59. “I once sent him a song and asked him to mark a cross wherever he thought it was faulty. Brahms returned it untouched, saying ‘I don’t want to make a cemetery of your compositions.’ ” — Hugo Wolf
  60. “I love Wagner, but the music I prefer is that of a cat hung up by its tail outside a window and trying to stick to the panes of glass with its claws.” — Charles-Pierre Baudelaire

Sea mechanic au Pirate Moodboard. @starsbellarke


Sailing the seas with you at my side.

The Music of "When You Believe"

One of the most powerful songs I ever have heard comes from “The Prince of Egypt”. It has brought me to tears on far more than one occasion (such as now, oops), and no matter how often I listen to it, the song maintains an incredible force that makes it, to my eyes as a working music composer myself, one of the greatest songs throughout animation.

The strength of this song comes from the combination of well-written lyrics plus the musical choices accompanying those lyrics. The composers (Stephen Schwartz and Hans Zimmer) very intentionally, very successfully aligned the deep emotions of the words with equally powerful music. By exploiting the effects of instrumentation, the shape of the melody line, musical key, and the lyrics, listeners are taken through a deep, emotion-wrought narrative of the Hebrews beginning the Exodus.

In Darkness

The start of “When You Believe” is very dark, moaning deep in the cellos and other low voices of the orchestra. For indeed, while Moses has just learned the Hebrews have been freed of their slavery from Egypt, it comes at an enormous price: the death of many Egyptians including his nephew, as well as a break in the bond between himself and his brother. There thus is a darkness to the music and the animation on the screen to match that dark event which is occurring in Moses’ life.

But even when Miriam begins to sing, the cityscape is still dark and the music retains its rich, dark ambiance. The instrumentation is mostly strings, especially the lower to mid-range. All is thick and solemn. On top of that, the melody is within the minor mode, a musical scale that is known for sounding more somber and sad than the major scale. This use of minor adds a weight and sadness to her words, continuing on that sense of darkness.

There’s a symbolic reason to cast that sense of aural shadow. Miriam’s words in the first verse sing of a darkness, too, within the Hebrews’ lives. “Many nights we prayed, with no proof anyone could hear,” she begins. There is a sense of hopelessness and darkness in her words, and the music likewise provides the sense that the lives of the slaves were cast in psychological powerlessness. The melody even drifts downward over the first line of the verse, the pitches descending with the line, metaphorically depicting downcast spirits.

If the music had been brighter and more upbeat, it would have emphasized the fact the Hebrews prayed vigilantly; however, with the deep strings and minor descending melody, audiences understand the oppressive hopelessness that crushed the peoples’ existence.

There are only slight hints of hope in the within the first verse, especially at the start. The first twinkle of hope within the darkness comes in the second line, “In our hearts a hopeful song we barely understood." 

Notice that the music rises before sinking downward again. The words peak on the word "hopeful,” in fact, with a dramatic leap up to the final syllable. There’s a sound of a song in that peaking interval (a fourth) which is associated with many types of folk musics from around the world, and that jump upward is a notable spark of hope to the ears. The song might still be cast in a dark minor melody, and that “hopeful song” might fall again to lower musical pitches in the rest of the musical line, but that little spark nonetheless is very aurally noticeable and depicts that little spark the Hebrews clung to themselves.

Increasing Brightness

There is an increasing brightness as the verse continues. It aligns with the growing hope in the lyrics as well as the brightening colors animated on the screen. The third line of the melody is the same as the first, but it’s orchestrated differently. The clarinet and the flute enter, warming up the texture of the music in the accompaniment, corresponding to the much more optimistic lyric, “Now we are not afraid.” This time, when the pitches fall at the end of the line, “even though there’s much to fear,” it gives a sense of determination rather than hopelessness.

And then the fourth and final line of the verse pulls forward an even greater transformation.

We have another symbolic rise - through a technique called “text painting” - in which the word “mountains” is musically described through the upward jump of pitches. The word “mountains” is a peak in the musical line, just as a mountain is a peak in the landscape. Corresponding visually, the viewers see pyramids and other grand Egyptian structures. These might not be mountains, but the enormity of those monuments is indeed something incredible to move. Suddenly, then, the Hebrews’ lives of slavery are not just torment and despair, but a demonstration of the strength of the people.

And look above at that final note in the verse. It moves upward, leading to the chorus, and showing an enormous growth of hope.

There Can be Miracles

Suddenly, there is sunrise. And Miriam is smiling. And people are coming together. And hope blossoms. And the music in the chorus sings it all: “There can be miracles when you believe. Though hope is frail, it’s hard to kill. Who knows what miracles you can achieve? When you believe, somehow you will. You will when you believe.”

The song changes keys to equate that shift in mood. The verse is in e minor, a very dark key orchestrationally that makes the music sound incredibly weighty and somber and allows composers to frequently use some of the lowest pitches the instruments can play. But then this song shifts to G major in the chorus. This is one of the brightest keys an orchestra can play (There are lots of “open strings” in this key, meaning that the strings in the violins, violas, cellos, and basses reverberate a lot more and sound very bright and rich). G major and e minor all use the same pitches, but to very different effects. In the same way, there is a shift from the content of the verse to the chorus, even though the material Miriam discusses is similar. It is a shift from unactualized hope to the experience of a miracle. And thus a shift from darkness to lightness occurs both within her words, within the sunrise of the animation, and within the change of mood in the music.  

The melody itself is very hopeful. Every single line of the melody, beginning with, “There can be miracles,” moves upward. The pitches always rise from start to end, showing enormous optimism.

Text painting also happens again; that is, the music shapes itself in ways to symbolically correlate to the meaning of the lyrics. The word “miracles” has an enormous rise in it, just like the words “hopeful” and “mountains." 

The word "believe” similarly receives a climactic high pitch, showing its greatness and importance.

The word “frail,” by contrast, is sung with an enormous drop downward in pitch, aurally creating a sense of weakness.

Even when the syllables occur in the music is very well placed and gives a sense of optimism and determination.

There is a sense of pulse in music. Some pulses are a lot heavier than others, and these are called “downbeats.” If you look at the pictures of musical notation I have, the “downbeats” happen with the first and third black notes of every measure (a measure is a chunk of music that is separated by those vertical lines). Every time you hit a downbeat, then, there is a sense of more power. And notice what words hit the downbeats in this music. Words like “can” and “hope”. In the line, “it’s hard to kill,” both “hard” and “kill” receive the musical metrical emphasis. What does this do? It emphasizes the greatest of what happened, shows that miracles can and in fact just have happened. It brings confidence to the lyrics.

The dotted rhythms create even more confidence within the melody line.

Altogether, then, the entirety of the chorus screams hope.

Continuation of Narrative

The second verse returns to the dark minor key that audiences heard in the first verse. Zipporah is speaking of the Hebrews’ experience of slavery in the lyrical narrative, thus requiring a thicker atmosphere to the music. We hear a little bit of song again in the rise of pitch with the words “summer bird,” as well as that fall of hope when subsequently she sings “too swiftly flown away.”

Paralleling the first verse, a similar growth from dark to light again occurs with the lyrics and the music in the second verse. And thus we move from despair to cheer as she sings: “In this time of fear, when prayer so often proves in vain hope seems like the summer birds, too swiftly flown away. Yet now I’m standing here, my heart so full I can’t explain, seeking faith and speaking words I’d never thought I’d say.” When Miriam adds a duet, a further sense of hope grows, for the people are coming together to begin the Exodus, traveling to freedom.

The second chorus is even musically bigger than the first, the visuals brighter, the hope more powerful. We see the Exodus happening now. There are people leaving. The miracle is here, it is happening, and the growth of music augments that.

The Children’s Song

Children begin singing, showing such a sense of hope as can be equaled by nothing else. The Bible indeed speaks of a child’s faith being great - not to mention the association with children is very positive and bright. The music is still in happy G major, though it also uses some pitches like C natural that never have been used before, making the music sound even brighter. The melody dances, and so do the people.

It is even more powerful when you know what the kids are saying.

It is part of a poem actually in the Bible seen in Exodus 15: 1, 11, and 13. Not only are these Hebrew lyrics actually in the Bible, but they are recorded as the song that Miriam and Aaron themselves sang when they were leaving Egypt. This is the song, guys! The legitimate words they sang in this event.

אָשִׁירָה לַה’ כִּי-גָאֹה גָּאָה 
מִי כָמֹכָה בָּאֵלִם ה’ מִי כָּמֹכָה נֶאְדָּר בַּקֹּדֶשׁ 
נָחִיתָ בְחַסְדְּךָ עַם-זוּ גָּאָלְתָּ 

Ashira laadonay ki gao gaa 
Ashira laadonay ki gao gaa
Mi chamocha baelim adonay
Mi kamocha needar bakodesh 
Nakhita vekhasdecha am zu gaalta 
Nakhita vekhasdecha am zu gaalta 
Ashira ashira ashira

So that’s all well and good to see the text in another language, but what does it mean in English?

Check it out:

I will sing unto the Lord, for He is highly exalted 
Who is like unto Thee, O Lord, among the mighty? who is like unto Thee, glorious in holiness 
Thou in Thy love hast led the people that Thou hast redeemed

In another translation that sounds a bit less archaic:

I will sing to the Lord, for he is highly exalted.
Who among the gods is like you, O Lord?
Who is like you - majestic in holiness?
In your unfailing love you will lead the people you have redeemed.

This song is one of being saved by God and thanking him for the miracle. And the music expands and everyone begins singing and an almost giddy happiness results when the song spins faster and faster.

The Power of Belief

The final chorus explodes in full choir. It is the voice now of the entire Hebrew people belting out faith and awe at what has happened. Not only that, but the music rises in pitch, bursting to A major. The music reaches an all-time dramatic high in terms of sheer force of musicians playing in singing, in terms of the highest pitches sung, and in terms of volume. 

The music climaxes in power - to the full power of belief. To the full glory of this miracle. What has happened has just changed millions of lives. Millions of lives are free and singing praise.

It is hard to believe now that the song began in such a dark corner, sounding so futile and depressed and hopeless. But through the incredible narration of sound and lyrics, everyone by the end of the song understand - understands full well - “There can be miracles when you believe.”

5

*Requested* Can u do an imagine where klaus’ teenage daughter and (half) sister Hope reunite with the family after the 5 years of being apart (reader was about 10 when all the stuff with marcel happened and he took klaus)

(I focused this more on the reader reuniting with the family (especially Klaus), but maybe I will write a continuation to this which will be more focused on Hope. Anyway, I hope you enjoy this kind of bittersweet one. Happy reading my lovelies!)

Characters: Teen Daughter! Reader, Klaus, Hope, Hayley and the rest of the family

Story Title: “5 long years”

Word count: 908

Your name: submit What is this?


The sun has barely risen on the horizon as the sound of rustling sheets and the presence of a body stirs you awake. You blink a few times and rub the sleep out of your eyes before you look next to you. As it seems your half-sister Hope has had another nightmare and crawled into your bed like she has a numerous of times before.

After a few minutes of almost dozing off to sleep, you decide to seize the day and get some morning air and collect a few of the flowers that grow in the area. Your auntie Beks always like them, and since today might be the day they all return, you thought it would be a nice gesture to have a few of them around. Also, Hope likes to draw flowers as well so you could kill two birds with one stone with them.

You quickly change and open the window leading out into the backyard with a roof below. You always sneak out like this, because Mary does not like if you wander off too far, which of course, never stops you.

.[Time skip]

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polymathema  asked:

♖: Soulmates can feel each other’s emotions

One night halfway through Sixth at Ilvermorny, Percival wakes up suddenly. Phantom pain prickles down his spine, a terrible hunger echoes through his bones, and an awful dizzy confusion blankets everything. It isn’t before the sun has risen and his room is dusted in gold that it all recedes, and he’s left with a whisper of contentment, a hot curl of happiness in his belly, and exhaustion that blankets him heavily. His soulmate has been born.

The rest of Sixth is hell, because he keeps falling asleep at the most inopportune moments and his mood swings between cranky and exhausted all the time. His dormmates find it hilarious, and someone gifts him a baby bottle and pacifier for Yule.

Still, the knowledge that his soulmate is just a baby lights a fire beneath him. He will look after them, he will take care of them. It drives him, this innocent child who feels soft emotions; he receives echoes of warmth, of quiet simple happiness, of the peaceful calm of an infant’s sleep. He wants to protect and cherish his soulmate’s gentle innocence, and it’s this drive to protect that turns him to Auror training.

The first time he grew angry, truly angry, after that was when he was nineteen and a brand-new Trainee Auror. Junior Auror Frye, to whom he’s assigned, refuses to listen to him when everything inside him is screaming that the warehouse they’re about to raid isn’t as empty as it seems. “What would you know?” Frye says with a sneer. He’s resentful, because Percival showed him up in front of Director Harkaway earlier that week. Despite Percival’s misgivings, they burst into the warehouse anyway. Trainee Auror Hardewicke is killed, and Junior Auror Frye loses his left eye.

Once the overwhelming fury subsides, he presses his hands into his stomach. “I’m sorry, I’m sorry,” he whispers, as if his soulmate could hear him.

His soulmate’s emotions are indistinct still, childish half-formed things. Percival’s anger and impotent rage has frightened them; he can feel the trembling fear, like a shivering animal trying to hide.

Except this time, unlike the handful of times when his soulmate has felt afraid before, the fear doesn’t reside. It grows stronger. Fear, and confusion, and the very real feeling of loss that builds in his chest until he can’t breathe. He has to take two days leave before he can even get out of bed, and still the awful grief trails him. Something awful has happened to his soulmate, and the impotent rage threatens to consume him again, because he can’t do anything to help the little life he promised to protect.

His soulmate’s childhood passes in this way. The fear slowly gives way to dull acceptance, heavy melancholy, and above all, roiling self-hatred. It grows worse in the evenings, and every Sunday Percival is confined to his bed, hardly daring to breathe in case it nudges the awful knot of pain, terror, and loathing that has settled beneath his breastbone.

It is around this time that his soulmate disappears for hours on end. The first time it happens Percival nearly faints, thinking his soulmate is dead. He is alone in his emotions for the first time in six years. Some hours later, his soulmate returns, exhausted and angry. Percival weeps then, full of fear. Don’t go, don’t go, he tries to beg his soulmate. There is no answer but the habitual sorrow that blankets his soulmate’s every action. The episodes of blankness happen again, and again, and again. He has no idea what they could be.

Percival tries to compensate for his little love’s overwhelming misery. He works himself to the bone, solving case after case, chasing the sensation of righteous justice that flares inside him when the criminals he arrested are declared guilty. He graduates from Auror training with flying colours and fierce pride in his chest.

His soulmate’s tenth birthday arrives and he waits with baited breath for their joy when they receive their Ilvermorny letter. But there is nothing; the usual sadness, shame, and grief echo in the marrow of his bones. For the first time, Percival wonders if he soulmate is a Squib, but resolves that he doesn’t care. He will find his soulmate when they are old enough, and he will give them enough joy to drown out the echoes of this miserable childhood.

He is promoted from Junior Auror to Senior in a handful of years, and savage joy leaps in his chest every time he sits at his own desk to himself in a corner of the bullpen. He hopes his soulmate feels his positive emotions just as keenly as Percival can feel their misery, and so every morning he lingers over the sight of his badge that reads Senior Auror Graves, trying to conjure up the sensation of pride, of joy, of determination.

I am proud of you, he tries to tell his soulmate through his emotions. I will find you. I will make you happy.

The years pass. He doesn’t find his soulmate. The echoed emotions he feels become muted and dull. His soulmate turns seventeen but feels no joy. Percival wishes keenly that he could find them, pepper them with the love they’ve been so starved of their entire life save those blissful early years.

Although his soulmate is now of age, Percival can’t bring himself to partake in the amorous dalliances that are common in unmatched witches and wizards. Even though he no longer has any moral compunctions, he can’t bear to hurt them. He wakes up some nights flushed with a lust that isn’t his own, toes curling and belly clenching for a touch on his cock. The first time he tried to take himself in hand through that dizzying haze, his desire echoing his soulmate’s echoing his, there’s a sudden snap of emotion and clarity before he’s drowning in a sea of horror and disgust, the ever-present shame and loathing growing stronger.

“I’m sorry, I’m sorry,” he whispers, winding his arms around his ribs and thinking of love, of forgiveness, of safety. Slowly, his soulmate’s emotions recede, and they fall back to sleep.

Percival gains a reputation among the rest of the Aurors of being utterly unflappable. The truth is that he doesn’t want to make his poor soulmate feel any worse than they already do every day. His insatiable drive to protect, as well as his reputation of having nerves of steel aids him professionally, and at the age of thirty-four, he’s promoted to Director of Magical Security when Director Harkaway retires. He lingers on the feeling of joy for days. His soulmate’s life is devoid of it, otherwise.

He is beginning to lose hope he will ever find his soulmate. He’s not even sure if they’re in the same time zone as he is. Senior Auror Sunbowe’s soulmate was on the other side of the planet before they found one another, and she’s mentioned how she’d feel tired and ready to sleep halfway through the day, and wake up halfway through the night. Percival’s soulmate is weary at all hours.

The only good thing that comes of his imprisonment under Grindelwald is that there is something in his soulmate’s life causing them to feel hope for the first time since those handful of years when he was a teenager. It flutters weakly at his breast like a wounded bird, and Percival hopes fervently that, wherever they are, his soulmate’s awful life is about to get better.

It’s a stupid hope. Their entire life has been nothing but agony and misery. Why should this be any different?

The periods of blankness become longer and more frequent. One night, he is woken from sleep by all-consuming rage and terror so incandescently bright that he manages to break through the seven layers of wards Grindelwald’s wrapped him in, and apparate straight to the office of Seraphine Picquery, where he blessedly loses consciousness.

He wakes up three days later in hospital, Junior Auror Porpentina Goldstein wringing her hands nervously at the foot of his bed. He listens to her explanation with half an ear.

He is once again alone. There is no familiar echo of emotion in his bones, no whisper of sadness inside his skull. His soulmate doesn’t come back to him. Recovery is made longer by the crushing loneliness that dogs his steps and consumes him when the Healers turn the lights off each evening.

It is months before Percival wakes up in the middle of the night, back at his apartment. A steady thrum of quiet emotion trembles at his fingertips. Hope, uncertainty, weariness. He lurches out of bed and opens his front door.

A boy – young man – stands on his doorstep, thin and in need of a haircut, his face all sharp angles and liquid feline eyes. Hope blooms inside Percival’s chest, answered by a hushed thrill and a tremulous smile on the young man’s face.

“Hello,” the young man says.

“Hello,” Percival replies.

Octavia, Raven, Clarke as best friends au Moodboard. Requested by anonymous.


Queens.

“I don’t care if I sing Off-Key
I found myself in my melodies”

- Bird Set Free, Sia

Sea Mechanic Moodboard. Requested by @onelittletigger


The sea will guide me to you.