honey is for bees

Fun Facts About Honey

- Honey is mostly sugar (WoW!) it is 80% sugar and 20% water (double WoW!)

- There are over 20,000 species of bees, but only 4 make HONEY

-Honey is the ONLY food that contains all the substances you need to survive (Including WATER)

-Children under the age of 1 should not eat honey… why? because sometimes it contains bad stuff called botulism and can cause them to get botulism poisoning (that sucks, even infants should taste the deliciousness that is honey)

-Honey will crystallize under optimum temperatures (this has a lot to do with how you store it)

-Bees produce honey to eat during the winter when there are no flowers and no nectar for them.

-A honeybee would only need an ounce of honey to be able to fuel a flight around the world (this makes for a very cultural bee!)

-A typical beehive can make up to 400 pounds of honey a year! (Wowza!)

The bumblebee was officially added to the endangered species list.

 Please:

  • Go plant an organic flower native to wherever you are
  • Leave your “weeds” alone they probably aren’t hurting anything
  • Stop using/buying Roundup and all other insecticides, herbicides, pesticides. 
  • If you have a bee problem (which almost never happens) call a local beekeeper! They will remove them safely free of charge
  • Bumblebees usually nest underground and just wanna be left alone! They won’t hurt you. To prevent destroying their habit during hibernation, avoid mowing yards until April or May. If you do mow, raise the blades to the highest setting

Please save my fat clumsy fuzzy friends I love them and they’re very good pollinators.

Japanese honeybees kill hornets by enclosing them in a ball of bees, and then shaking so fast and generating so much heat that they cook the hornet at 115°F. - Source

European honeybees have no innate defense against the hornets, which can rapidly destroy their colonies. Although a handful of Asian giant hornets can easily defeat the uncoordinated defenses of a honeybee colony, the Japanese honeybee has an effective strategy. When a hornet scout locates and approaches a Japanese honeybee hive, she emits specific pheromonal hunting signals. When the Japanese honeybees detect these pheromones, a hundred or so gather near the entrance of the nest and set up a trap, keeping the entrance open. This permits the hornet to enter the hive. As the hornet enters, a mob of hundreds of bees surrounds it in a ball, completely covering it and preventing it from reacting effectively. The bees violently vibrate their flight muscles in much the same way as they do to heat the hive in cold conditions. This raises the temperature in the ball to the critical temperature of 46 °C (115 °F). In addition, the exertions of the honeybees raise the level of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the ball. At that concentration of CO2, they can tolerate up to 50 °C (122 °F), but the hornet cannot survive the combination of high a temperature and high carbon dioxide level. Some bees do die along with the intruder, much as happens when they attack other intruders with their stings, but by killing the hornet scout, they prevent it from summoning reinforcements that would wipe out the entire colony.

Photo : Takahashi/wikipedia

Some of you were curious about the honey process

Well, I’m here to show you what these wonderful little ladies make, and how us humans collect the extra.

Some Vocabulary:

This is a Langstroth beehive. Those boxes in it are called “Supers”. Supers hold 10 frames each. Frames look like this.

I’m here to teach you about honey extraction from this particular kind of hive, and when you only have like 5 or 6.

The Process:

First, we start with the frame of honey.

Notice anything? The bees have “capped” this honey with beeswax so it can keep for the winter! (or beekeep heheh)

So what you wanna do is cut those bad boys off with ya Hot Knife.

(Or you can just scrape them off with a fork. Or poke holes in them. Dealer’s choice, man.)

Next, you put your uncapped frames in the Crazy Spin Cylinder. (The Extractor)

And YA CRANK IT

And the honey sp i n s

Honey GO

H O N  E  Y


The frames are spun at such a high speed that the honey is pulled right out!

Next, you open the spigot at the bottom, run it through a strainer…

Pour it in a jar…

and VOILA!

Beautiful Bee Nectar that you got yaself! This has been a PSA