honestly most of them look exactly the same just drawn in a different style

Da, da, da, daaaaaaaa…… that’s a little more dramatic than I had intended. I love all these wonderful Sai tutorials that get posted on here but I haven’t seen much attention payed to Sai’s Lineart tool which I can’t get enough of. I’m sure there probably are Lineart Layer tutorials out there - I just haven’t come across one so I’m just adding to the pile. The Lineart tool is so awesome it deserves any number of tutorials anyway. It’s so easy to use, it saves me so much time, and it offers so much control which I really love. Honestly, the tool is so easy to use that this is less of a tutorial and more of just a general encouragement to just whip it out and start playing with it. Yeah. So say we start with a simple line like this swirly-wirly thingy that I drew with the marker tool. Well, the first step would be to create a linework layer by clicking the linework layer button.

There we go. Now, a lineart layer in Sai is different from any other regular layer in Sai and it will bring up a completely new range of tools. I’m gonna briefly go through them but the best way to understand exactly what each does is to just try them out for yourself. There’s no substitute for experience or however the saying goes.

  • Pen - This is your freehand lineart tool and to best honest I don’t really use it that often. That’s just me personally. I have an expensive gaming rig that has all sorts of magic running under the hood but we all know that Sai’s memory management is pretty crappy and I don’t need the lag or crashes that come with this tool when working at a high DPI. You may have a different, entirely pleasant experience with this particular tool but for me, if I’m doing freehand inking, I’d much rather just use the regular Pencil tool.
  • Eraser - Kinda speaks for itself.
  • Weight - This one I do love. Say you’ve drawn a line - or a path as Sai calls it. With this tool you can adjust the thickness of the particular line by simply selecting the brush size and then clicking on the line.
  • Color - Same as Weight. Simply select your desired colour and then select the desired line you’d like to change. Very useful. For the aesthetic.
  • Edit - This one comes with its own subset of mini-tools that I’ll get into in a moment. But this is definitely a useful tool - for me it’s probably the most useful.
  • Pressure - This is the one that adds the character to your linework. I’ll explain further below.
  • SelPen - A selection tool. Pretty standard. Since the Lineart layer works in ‘Anchor’ points (which again, I’ll get in to further down below) I don’t really use this one.
  • SelErs - Selection Erase. Goes hand in hand with the SelPen. I can’t say that I personally use this one  much.
  • Curve & Line - The Curve and the Line tools are the cornerstones of the Linework layer. I’m explain both further down.

The Edit tool, as I mentioned, brings up its own list of sub-tools. And they definitely have their uses. Again, it’s best to play around with them to truly get a grasp of what they do but I’ll just run through them quickly before I get on with the main tutorial.

  • Select - For selecting anchor points of paths. Honestly, I don’t really use this one too much simply because hovering over a point or path and clicking will select it.
  • Move/Add - Now this one I use a lot. Moving an anchor will affect the curvature of your line if you’ve used the ‘Curve’ tool, or you can add curves to a straight line by clicking and dragging in between anchor points.
  • Delete CP/Curve - Kinda speaks for itself. It will delete an achor point in your line. Sometimes this can be useful for making your curves rounder if you’ve added too many points to it.
  • Deform Path - Again, kinda self explanatory. It will warp your line. I don’t really use this one myself but that’s not to say that it couldn’t have its uses.
  • Deform Anchor - See above.
  • Move Path - Instead of moving just an anchor or adjusting the curvature of your line you can move the entire line at once. Can be useful.
  • Duplicate Path - Does exactly what it says - creates a copy of your line. Haven’t found much use for this simply because I don’t particularly like copy/paste stuff in linework. Faults or differences add character.
  • Delete Path - deletes a line you’ve drawn independently of other lines on your linework layer. Can be useful as well.
  • Connect CPs - This is difficult to explain the benefits of. It’s one that should be experimented with. It basically joins lines together. I use it quite often. Just pick this option and drag from one anchor point to another to join them.
  • Pointed/Rounded - See the diagram below for this one. I find it very useful.

As you can see I used the Curve tool to draw a simple curve (left) and then I used the Pointed/Rounded tool to convert the curve into a point (right) by selecting the tool and then clicking on the anchor point at the height of the curve. I find it very useful. Anyway, back to our swirly-wirly thingy.

Because our swirly-wirly thingy is basically one long curve, I simply select the curve tool and start clicking. Starting at the centre point on one end, I click to add anchor points as I trace the shape of the object. Each point adjusts the curvature from the last point. It’s kinda hard to explain verbally or even visually but try it out and you’ll quickly see how it works.

Once I have a line over whatever I’m inking done I like to adjust the weight to suit my preferences. I like to work with thicker lines because they give more room to play around with weight. So to adjust the weight you click on the Weight tool, select a brush size and then click on your line. If only it were that simple in life.

Once I have a good weight selected I move on to the Pressure tool. The pressure tool gives you two options. Pressure for width and pressure for density. Width is like controlling the weight of the line at individual points and density controls the transparency. I don’t usually use the density option. As with traditional inking I prefer to denote depth, shadow, etc. with weight as you can see in the image above. To adjust the pressure, simply select the pressure tool and then select an anchor point. Click, hold and drag to the left to make the line thinner of more transparent and to the right to make the line thicker and more dense. As you drag, a percentage will appear over the anchor point you’ve selected. This can be useful for keeping things consistent.

That’s all well and good for curved lines but what about straight lines? That’s where the line tool comes in. It works exactly the same way except it won’t add a curvature to your anchor pints. Still very useful though. Especially when combined with the Weight and Pressure tools.

Here’s an example of one my drawings. It’s Dark Empress Kitana from Mortal Kombat. The one in red is the pencils which if converted to black would probably make a pretty good linework layer. I’m a firm believer in taking the time to clean up your sketch/pencils layer because it will dictate your entire drawing. The one below in black was done using Sai’s linework layer feature. Although not entirely.

As much as I love Sai’s linework layer, it can look a little too clean which is not great when you’re drawing people. Although, it’s all art so it’s all up to personal preferences and personal style. There’s no wrong way to do it. For me though, I prefer to do skin, facial features, hair, etc. by hand using Sai’s Pencil tool on a normal layer and reserve the Linework Layer for architecture, clothing or any non-organic substances. I inked Kitana’s eyes and eyebrows freehand ( or as freehand as you can be with Sai’s amazing stabilisers) but everything else such as her armour or her fan weapon thingy was done using the Curve and Line tools on the Linework Layer.

I hope this tutorial has been useful. Or if not useful - then at least encouring to try out Sai’s linework layer. It’s such a robust feature that I don’t see get much attention and I can’t even begin to describe how much time it saves me or how much I adore it. If you have any questions (because I’m well aware how unsuited I am to writing tutorials - this is so damn rambly - sorry!) then feel free to drop me an ask here at keithbyrneart.

P.S, sorry about my handwriting in the stills. It’s gotten a lot messier these days.

BARDA FREE (AKA BIG BARDA)

After starting off by talking about a couple of my favourite ladies of the JLI, how could I resist talking about a character that often guest starred in the JLI alongside of them?  Big, brash, and larger than life even among her superheroic colleagues, today’s post is about none other than…



Barda Free, AKA Big Barda, one of my favourite characters to come out of Jack Kirby’s brilliant mind.

Even among the often soap operatic hijinks of cape comics, the fourth world - the comics that Barda had originated in - seems incredibly over the top.  And it is, in a delightful way that’s best left for a separate post.  The point here is, Big Barda is from a very, very different world than most other recurring DC Comics characters, and it shows; even in a genre in which warrior women are common, Barda manages to be distinct from them all in her inextinguishable spirit and passion of emotion, whether it be determination, anger, or, stronger than the two of them combined, love.  

Keep reading

anonymous asked:

Hey there! So I'm kind of sloppy with my pattern making and I play it by eye and I know it's not really good to do that, so I was wondering if you guys have any tips on drafting patterns? Your patterns look so neat and clean and you guys do a very nice job of figuring out what needs to go where

There’s a lot to say here and I’m slowly working on a master post for drafting patterns, so for this ask I’m just going to start with the right tools for the job, because that tends to make a huge difference. When Christine taught me how to draft this way, my cosplay game surged. Having the right drafting toolkit is invaluable.

A typical draft for us includes the following tools:

White drawing/sketch paper. We buy this in a 50 yard roll, generally around 36″ wide. You can probably expect to pay about $50 for this, which is a decent start-up cost, but Christine and I have both been working on the same roll for about a year and a half now and we’ve done probably 25+ costumes on it and we’re barely halfway through.

This is the paper you’ll use to draw all your patterns on, flat, without seam allowances. All your patterns should exist primarily on this paper, because they are the foundations of your drafts: if you want to make changes to the pattern, this is where you make them. If you want to add decorative seams on the pattern, this is where you make them. Making your patterns without seam allowance here also means you can “pull” pieces onto the tracing paper with different seam allowances as you so desire.

We also keep these and label ‘em and pull them out again from time to time. Shazz’s Lucina tunic, for example, was initially traced and pulled from a 60s dress pattern that Christine had made for Shazz, and then I refined it down into its own pattern. More recently, I pulled Anna’s sleeves from Say’ri’s sleeves – Emmy and Syd are the same size and the characters have the same style sleeves, so why not? If you’re making costumes primarily for yourself, you might do this a lot, coming back to re-use old drafts or adapt old drafts. If you know they already fit you, might as well!

Tracing paper, typically Borden & Riley #41 tracing paper, bought in 20 yard rolls, 36″ wide. These cost about $15 CND from Curry’s and generally get a good number of costumes out of them; the current roll I’m working on has done almost all of Tiki, Anna, Libra, Say’ri, Ike and Emmeryn. (Not including Tiki or Anna’s capes, including Emmeryn’s cape.) (These also make great gifts for cosplayers, given their functionality and price point.) This paper is what your final patterns are on, traced from the drafts you’ve drawn on the sketch paper – you trace them and add seam allowance as you desire. 

Various quilting rulers. I believe these are called 8th rulers, but I’ve encountered so many names for them that I’m not sure what to call them beyond the quilting umbrella. We like quilting rulers because they typically have a lot of demarkations we use a lot, and they measure across the entire surface of the ruler, rather than just down one edge. I can measure 3/8ths away from an edge (looking through the clear ruler) and then draw a straight line that is exactly 3/8ths away – that kind of thing. Something like these Westcott ones in 18″ and 26″ are great.

A french curve. With enough practice you can draw curves like a beast with a straight quilting ruler, but a french curve will help you get all those angles. Plastic three-piece kits like this one are cheap but invaluable; I think I’ve been using the same $3 ruler set for like ten years now.

A large eraser. You’ll make changes. You will. Standard Staedtler white erasers are my favourite.

Mechanical pencils. Don’t use regular pencils. A 0.5mm mechanical pencil will prevent you from constantly running to the sharpener and your lines will be neater, thinner and hopefully smudge less. Regular pencils will get you dull lines as they lose their sharpness.

A big surface to work on. Currently it’s the kitchen table for us, but when necessary we will spread out on the hard floor; try to avoid this whenever possible because it will hurt your back and knees over time. You may want to acquire a large folding worktable or find some sort of dedicated surface to work on that isn’t your kitchen table, too; my table is 10+ years old and looks like hell already so I don’t mind working on it, but lots of craft work will eventually damage the surface. The poor thing gets wiped down from graphite and pencil nicks and whatever all the time. 

Good lighting. We don’t have this and it is slowly killing me.

Scotch tape. Sometimes we use the tracing paper to trace an element, mirror it (flip the paper over) and then tape it to another part of the pattern to repeat something. Alternately, we sometimes use it to trace and element and then MOVE it in the pattern. Notice how in that image I wasn’t using scotch tape? That’s because I was out of scotch tape. Scotch tape is neater and thinner, and while harder to reposition than masking tape, a lot less distracting/ugly.

A flexible tape measure. Need to make sure two seams are the same length? This guy. Need to do a long distance your quilting ruler can’t cover? Make notches along the way with this guy. Need to figure out a measurement on yourself and transfer it to paper? This guy.

Paper scissors. Sing it with me: you never, ever, ever cut paper with your fabric scissors. Keep dedicated paper scissors and dedicated fabric scissors and never, ever cross over. In this household, we mark the handles of paper scissors with white electrical tape. You know there are commercial locks on the market specifically to lock your sewing scissors together to prevent the ignorant from using your sewing scissors to hack into cardboard? I’m serious. They’re wonderful.

Some sort of filing system. Patterns are very easy to lose. We use standard 8x11.5″ envelopes for our patterns, sometimes larger/thicker for bigger projects. If a pattern is not in use, it goes in envelope – no excuses, don’t lose pieces. (But hey, if you do… you can trace another off your draft!)

Some sort of labelling system. Nothing sucks more than unfolding a dozen drafting papers trying to find so-and-so’s shirt or so-and-so’s pants ‘cause later down the line you realized you could use it again… if you could find it. 

Anyway, them’s the basics :) I’ll try to follow up soonish with more on this subject, because I honestly think it’s the most helpful thing I’ve learned in this hobby, hands down.

- Jenn

anonymous asked:

Maybe this is weird but sometimes I feel like literally every single member of 1D isnt straight at all. Like they all like men and everybody has been with everybody. Maybe Ive been brainwashed by all the ships but sometimes my mere intuition tells me theyre all into men!

Do you know what one of the best things about becoming a fan of One Direction has been? It’s seeing other people’s stories about figuring out parts of themselves and, specifically, their sexualities that they never had a way to verbalise. 

I was very fortunate to grow up in a very liberal environment. My godparents were two gay men and one of their mothers who I grew up knowing as my nan was a lesbian. She wasn’t able to come out when she was growing up (it was the 30s…being gay literally illegal), but was very much a proud gay woman and very supportive of her son. So, I had a very ‘you love who you love’ kind of attitude instilled in me from a young age.

However, I also grew up during a time where there was a distinct binary between “gay” and “straight”. I used to sing that song Phoebe sang on Friends that went, ‘Some women love women and some men love men, then there are bisexuals but some say they’re just kidding themselvvvvvves…’ And honestly, that was really the kind of conversation around bisexuality at the time. That it was like the gateway label to being gay, and somehow a bit of a joke. Like, “Yeah. OKAY. You’re “bisexual”. *WINK*.” 

It was really only when I heard comedian Margaret Cho talking about her experience with sleeping with a woman and then afterwards she said she felt like, “Am I gay?! Am I straight?! And then I realised…I’m just slutty. Where’s my parade?” that I felt like someone had verbalised how I felt. 

Now, I have exclusively dated and slept with men. However, my attraction to people really knows no bounds. If I’m attracted to someone, I’m not going to sit there and do a gender-test before deciding if I actually like them. Just because I’ve never slept with a woman doesn’t mean I haven’t thought about it. But, again, I just labeled myself as kind of slutty in the fondest way and didn’t really give any further thought to it. Until I joined Tumblr. 

As we’ve gotten older I’ve had discussions with a lot of my friends about sexuality and most of the people I grew up with and I share a common belief that everyone falls somewhere on a scale, but that at the core of it attraction is due to something chemical which largely takes personal control away from who you’re attracted to. As someone who is very open to being attracted to anyone I can honestly say from transvestites to men to women who use to be men to women, I’ve found myself pretty much attracted to every different kind of person. 

Now what does this have to do with One Direction? It took me two seconds to come to the conclusion that Louis Tomlinson and Harry Styles at the very least lusted after each other in a very primal and obvious way. It took me a bit longer to realise that I had completely ignored a similar attraction between Liam Payne and Zayn Malik. Attraction is probably the hardest thing to hide. Watching them try to subtly touch each other all the time is such a familiar concept to me, since that’s exactly what two people who are drawn to each other do. It’s why I have to stay away from certain exes, because put us in the same room and it’ll be less than a minute before some part of our bodies is touching and probably less than a couple hours before we’re making naked mistakes.

I do not think it’s impossible to assume that all of them have at some point looked at each other and thought ‘Holy shit you’re attractive,’ because, that’s exactly what all of us do every day. There’s a reason I tag pictures of Harry’s bum in my art tag. They are beautiful human beings and you don’t have to be a gay man to admit that Harry Styles is gorgeous. My best friend, who like me has exclusively dated and shagged the opposite sex, told me in way too much detail exactly what he would do with Harry Styles because he was “a beautiful man.” To give you an idea of his explicit rant, it was after he saw a picture of Harry eating a banana.

What I am trying to say is that I’m not here to slap labels on people since I genuinely hope that human thought just evolves to a point where we accept that who we’re attracted to has absolutely nothing to do with what some old ass book told you was right or wrong. Similarly, I don’t particularly believe in the strict binaries of gender either. I think people fall on a scale of masculine or feminine, but that it’s completely independent to who you’re attracted to. 

So, to answer your question in the most long-winded way possible: I don’t think anyone is 100% straight at all. People can have preferences, but like One Direction said, “All I know at the end of the day is you love who you love, there ain’t no other way…”

theatlantic.com
Meet The Lifelong Republicans Who Love Bernie Sanders
Some conservatives are defying expectation and backing the Vermont senator.
By Clare Foran

When Tarie MacMillan switched on her television in August to watch the first Republican presidential debate, she expected to decide which candidate to support.

But MacMillan, a 65-year-old Florida resident, was disappointed. “I looked at the stage and there was nobody out there who I really liked. It just seemed like a showcase for Trump and his ridiculous comments,” she recalled. “It was laughable, and scary, and a real turning point.”

So she decided to back Bernie Sanders, the self-described “Democratic socialist” challenging Hillary Clinton. MacMillan was a lifelong Republican voter until a few weeks ago when she switched her party affiliation to support the Vermont senator in the primary.  It will be the first time she’s ever voted for a Democrat.

That story may sound improbable, but MacMillan isn’t the only longtime conservative supporting Sanders. There are Facebook groups and Reddit forums devoted entirely to Republicans who adore the Vermont senator.


These Republicans for Sanders defy neat categorization. Some are fed up with the status quo in Washington, and believe that Sanders, with his fiery populist message, is the presidential contender most likely to disrupt it. Others have voted Republican for years, but feel alarmed by what they see as the sharp right turn the party has taken.

“I have been a conservative Republican my entire life. But the Republican party as a whole has gotten so far out of touch with the American people,” says Bryan Brown, a 47-year-old Oregon resident. “I switched my registration so that I could vote for Sanders in the primary, but the day the primary is over I’m going to register as an Independent.”

Anger and alienation have turned conventional wisdom upside down in this presidential election. Self-styled outsider candidates like Donald Trump and Ben Carson have surged in the polls. And as Republican candidates debate their conservative credentials, support for Sanders shows how difficult it can be to pin down what exactly it means to be conservative.

“Once you get out of Washington ‘conservative’ can mean all sorts of different things. Voters are often left of center on some issues and right of center on others. So someone like Trump or Sanders who talks about themselves in a way that doesn’t fit into a pre-ordained box could be appealing to a lot of people,” says Chris Ellis, a political science professor at Bucknell University.

In some cases, longtime Republican voters who have decided to support Sanders, like MacMillan, are rethinking their political affiliation entirely. (“I’m inclined to say I might stay with the Democratic Party because the Republican Party has changed and it’s not the way it used to be,” MacMillan says.) Far from claiming to have experienced a political conversion, other Republicans argue that Sanders actually embodies conservative values.

“When I think of true conservative values I think of Teddy Roosevelt who earned a reputation as a trust-buster,” says Jeff DeFelice, a 38-year-old registered Republican voter living in Florida. “Now look at Bernie. He’s the only one willing to stand up to the big banks. The big banks control an obscene amount of wealth in this country and he wants to go after them.” If Sanders looks like “a viable candidate” by the time the primary rolls around, DeFelice says he’ll switch his party affiliation to vote for the senator.

“Once you get out of  Washington ‘conservative’ can mean all sorts of different things.”

Sanders’s promise to wrest power away from Wall Street and return it to the American middle class taps into the same vein of populist anger that fueled the rise of the Tea Party. It’s also a message that resonates with mainstream Republicans and Democrats. Sixty-two percent of Republicans, for example, believe that large corporations wield too much influence on American politics, according to a New York Times/CBS News poll conducted in May.

“Sanders has focused primarily on economic issues on which Americans are not divided,” says Elizabeth Coggins, a professor at Colorado College who studies American political psychology and ideological identification. “There is a strong consensus in agreement with Sanders on many of his core ideas, and his rhetoric has been largely centered on these sorts of issues.”

It’s difficult to say how deep conservative support for the senator runs. But its existence nevertheless challenges the notion that Sanders won’t be capable of building a diverse coalition to back his campaign during the 2016 presidential contest.

Still, some of the stands that may make Sanders attractive to conservatives leave a bad taste in the mouths of many liberals. Sanders brags about his D- rating from the National Rifle Association, but has suggested in the past that gun laws are best left to the states. “I’ve always felt like most issues should be handled on a state level, and he kind of takes a state level approach to gun control,” says Ashby Edwards, a 43-year-old self-described lifelong conservative living in Virginia.

Other Republicans are drawn to his fiery personality: “I’ve watched some of Bernie Sanders’s town halls and there have been people who will try to speak over him and sometimes he just tells people to shut up and starts screaming at them. That’s awesome,” says Andrew Holl, a 38-year-old registered Republican voter living in Florida. “I think it’s evidence of being genuine. He reacts honestly in every situation.”

Holl plans to vote for Sanders if he makes it to the general election.  “This is the first time I’ve ever considered voting for a Democrat. If you read the definition of what a Republican is and what those ideals are that’s me. But when you look at the Republicans in this election, I don’t like most of them,” Holl adds.

Some conservatives readily admit they don’t love everything Sanders stands for, but insist that doesn’t change their affinity the senator.

“I’m not 100 percent behind his platform but I like him as a person. For me it really comes down to authenticity,” says Edwards. “We’ve seen so much deadlock in Congress and I think people are looking for someone who can be passionate and authentic rather than being partisan.”

Republicans who support Sanders don’t like being labeled liberals either, but that’s not enough to deter them: “There’s a mentality of ‘you’re either this or you’re that’, but the world doesn’t work that way,” DeFelice says. “Things aren’t always black or white. The world operates in shades of gray.”