homemade body products

4
EDIBLE COCONUT ROSE SUGAR SCRUB.

Every few months or so, and certainly in the romantic fixation of Valentine’s Day, I begin to think I know what love is. How it ought to feel, the breath it catches in my throat, the texture of its weight against my heart, the way it turns me inside out. Its expansive yes. My dad and his partner Susan sent me a short passage by the lovely poet David Whyte earlier this week, about not naming love too soon. When we do, we limit it. We rob it of the oxygen it needs to expand.

But the truth is, there are so very many kinds of love. There is the love I see dear friends experiencing for the first time this year as they become mothers and fathers, the love between two friends who’ve known each other for decades, the love between lovers just nascently entangled, the love between teacher and student, the love between near-strangers falling into a friendship that will sustain them for years. The truth is, there are infinite loves. Loves so numerous and ineffable that they cannot ever even hope to be named.

And so, for all things intoxicating and unnameable: This edible, sparkling coconut rose sugar scrub.

Making Infused Oils!

There are 2 methods to preparing Infused Oils – Hot Infusions and Cold Infusions

 Cold Infused Oil:

“The Folk Method” 

  1. Grind the dried herb to as fine a powder as possible.
  2. Place the powdered herb in a jar that can be capped tightly and add a fixed oil of your choice. Use enough to completely wet the herb.
  3. Stir the mixture well.
  4. Let the herb settle, then add enough oil to cover the wet herb an additional ¼ inch thick (about 1 cm). Some lighter herbs will float to the surface, so let there be an additional ¼ inch below the herbs.
  5. Many dried herbs will absorb this extra ¼ inch of oil. Check your mixture 24 hours later, and if absorption has occurred, add enough oil to re-establish the extra measure of oil.
  6. Cap the jar tightly.
  7. Place it in a thick paper bag or box to keep light out, and place in the sun for 7 to 10 days (a warm to hot infusion, depending on the weather).
  8. Shake or stir the mixture every couple of hours each day or at least several times a day.
  9. When the infusion is completed, strain the oil from the herb and press the remaining pulp.
  10. Allow the infusion to sit still for several days, then decant and filter out sediment.
  11. Bottle in glass containers, cap tightly, and store in a cool dark place.

 Hot Infused Oils:

  1. Add 250g dried, or 500g fresh, herb to 750mL Fixed oil.
  2. Stir the chopped herb and oil together in a bowl over a saucepan of boiling water. Cover and simmer gently for 2-3 hours.
  3. Remove from the heat and allow the mixture to cool, then pour into the bowl through the muslin cloth. Collect the strained oil in the bowl, pressing all the liquid out of the herb.
  4. Pour the infused oil into clean dark glass bottles, using a funnel. Seal and label the bottles.

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I have made rosemary, basil, lavender, thyme, eucalyptus, chamomile, peppermint, plantain, and comfrey infused oils. I add these infused oils to all my homemade body care products and shampoos! They are really easy to make. I have experimented with different oils but I usually use olive oil as it is easy to come by! Enjoy these notes!

Finally made my own body butter tonight and it turned out great! It whipped up nice and it absorbed well into the skin when I used it.

If anyone else is interested in making their own here is the recipe I used.

- ½ cup shea butter
- ¼ cup coconut oil (solid)
- ¼ jojoba oil


You melt the shea butter and coconut oil together in a double boiler. (If you’re like me and don’t have a double boiler you could just use a glass measuring cup or a smaller pot.) Once it’s all melted pour it into a bowl and add the jojoba oil and any essential oils you want to use to add scent. I used lavender, eucalyptus and sweet orange oils for this.

The next step is important to getting it to whip: put the mixture into the freezer for about 10-15 minutes until it starts to solidify. You don’t want it too solid where it has chunks that won’t blend, but it needs to be somewhat thick and no longer translucent. The edges will harden before the middle so what I did was take it out a little early, use the mixer to mix it up to where it started thickening a little and then put it back in the freezer for two or three more minutes. Then I used the mixer again and this time it whipped up nice and thick. I put it in a small ball jar and I was done!

My next project it to make my own beeswax lip balm. :)