homeless women and children

“For The Record” - Adrienne Rich

The clouds and the stars didn’t wage this war
the brooks gave no information
if the mountain spewed stones of fire into the river
it was not taking sides
the raindrop faintly swaying under the leaf
had no political opinions

and if here or there a house
filled with backed-up raw sewage
or poisoned those who lived there
with slow fumes, over years
the houses were not at war
nor did the tinned-up buildings

intend to refuse shelter
to homeless old women and roaming children
they had no policy to keep them roaming
or dying, no, the cities were not the problem
the bridges were non-partisan
the freeways burned, but not with hatred

Even the miles of barbed-wire
stretched around crouching temporary huts
designed to keep the unwanted
at a safe distance, out of sight
even the boards that had to absorb
year upon year, so many human sounds

so many depths of vomit, tears
slow-soaking blood
had not offered themselves for this
The trees didn’t volunteer to be cut into boards
nor the thorns for tearing flesh
Look around at all of it

and ask whose signature
is stamped on the orders, traced
in the corner of the building plans
Ask where the illiterate, big-bellied
women were, the drunks and crazies,
the ones you fear most of all: ask where you were.

#SUCCESS: The Senate has finally passed a stalled anti-human trafficking bill that will increase penalties for perpetrators and support for survivors!

While we were hopeful the Senate would also pass the Runaway and Homeless Youth and Trafficking Prevention Act, this legislation is a step in the right direction.

LIKE to celebrate today’s bipartisan support for trafficking survivors!

Read the full story here.

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*N E W* Melanin On Fleek T Shirt!! Taking pre orders now! Email shop@everettblakeco.com

As promised to ALL my melanin rich people, a little surprise I’ve been working on. The first piece of the Online store:

E V E R E T T X B L A K E
“Taking ownership of our lifestyle, vernacular, and culture”

It is time we realize our potential, apply it, and exude our power positively. We promote original and collaboration pieces that exemplify black excellence using the tools the media uses in its efforts to degrade said excellence. Using social media, we ask our customers to help our initiative to give back to the community. Via the efforts of our #GiveBlack Project, every 20th shirt purchased we will donate a shirt to the homeless. Men, women, and children lost in our system will get a shirt courtesy of its people. We ask our customers to photograph a selfie of them wearing their product with the hashtag #GiveBlack and the 20th customer will get 20% off their next purchase.

Email now! Shirts go on sale Friday April 3rd

**LIMITED RUN**
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#MelaninOnFleek #EverettXBlake #BlackOut #MelaninMonday #BlackisBeautiful #GiveBlack #StayPositive

“I want to be a scientist.”
“What’s the best part about being a scientist?”
“Discovering bugs.”

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This is one of a series of portraits featuring residents and staff of the Win Homeless Shelter for Women And Children. In addition to providing programs and services aimed at breaking the cycle of homelessness, Win provides shelter for 4500 people across NYC every night, including 2700 children.

“Our building had so many violations that all the residents had to be evicted. Turns out the landlord hadn’t paid the mortgage since 2000. Some of us tried to stay, but it didn’t work. We moved to a hotel room for three days until we ran out of money. At that point we had no choice. So my partner and I ran to City Hall and got married, so that we could live in the shelter together. I never wanted to get married like that. We told ourselves that we’d have another ceremony once things are better.”

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This is one of a series of portraits featuring residents and staff of the Win Homeless Shelter for Women And Children. In addition to providing programs and services aimed at breaking the cycle of homelessness, Win provides shelter for 4500 people across NYC every night, including 2700 children.

“We’ve been in the shelter system ever since their father was murdered. We needed his paycheck to pay the rent. We had no choice. He had a good job at the Pepsi factory. We were engaged at the time, and we were about to move upstate. We were even planning to take a trip to Disney World. But when he died, a part of me died. I went into a depression. Everything was moving around me, but I was at a standstill. I didn’t want to do my hair. I didn’t want to be bothered with the kids. We used to go to the park and play, but after their father was killed, we were homebodies. I just wanted to stay at home and cry.”

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This is one of a series of portraits featuring residents and staff of the Win Homeless Shelter for Women And Children. In addition to providing programs and services aimed at breaking the cycle of homelessness, Win provides shelter for 4500 people across NYC every night, including 2700 children.

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[ CareMore x AfroPunk ] For the past two months our organization [ CARE MORE ] ( founded by Mercedes C. Smith ) has been partners with [ AFRO PUNK ] for their homeless outreach program to give back to the homeless men, women & children of New York City. Here are a few photographs I have taken during one of our outreach events at union square park. For more information to get involved contact me or go to LETSCAREMORE.COM Thank you to everyone who has been coming out for the past two months to help volunteer to help give to people in need. It’s all about unity & helping each other. Much love, peace & progress.

“It’s hard for a child to live in a shelter. They can’t invite their friends over. They can’t have sleepovers. They can’t have their own space. They can’t go to their room when they’re being punished. There’s no personal time for them to discover themselves without interruption. There’s even confusion toward the word ‘home.’ Sometimes they’ll say ‘I’m going home,’ but then they’ll correct themselves and say, ‘I’m going upstairs.’ We tell them that this is where they are staying while they make plans. This is only their home until they find a real home.”

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This is one of a series of portraits featuring residents and staff of the Win Homeless Shelter for Women And Children. In addition to providing programs and services aimed at breaking the cycle of homelessness, Win provides shelter for 4500 people across NYC every night, including 2700 children.

Okay for a long time I cut Carrie Brownstein slack bc she’s obviously incredibly socially awkward and uncomfortable with her level of fame, even as it grew.

But that shit stops MATTERING once you start profiting off an illusion of a place that never existed and that is in fact DAMAGING to the real, physical place and the lives with in it.

Over the past few years as displacement has intensified, as racial profiling and violence has amped up, as people lose their houses and homeless people die in the heat and women with children sleep on the streets because of lack of shelter funding, you start to wonder:

If you’re making a show about a city, what’s your obligation to the actual city and the people who have to live in it? Can you modify the jokes so that they stop being about clueless white yuppies and start targeting the selfishness of local government? Can you start punching up while drawing awareness to the problems endemic to the punch line of your joke, or do you keep the joke to one line that is patently, patently false, every day more false as people attracted by the promise of the show move here and intensify the already existing problems.

I tweeted at her a sketch idea I had, about the endless phone hoops of trying to get into shelter. It is pretty funny in a bitter and painful way. She didn’t answer.

I won’t be watching the new season (but I haven’t watched any season, with the exception of the opening sequence my ex and everyone I know was in and the one episode I was in) but I’m interested to hear about it from anyone who does watch it.

How long can this be posed as a funny joke, when it has zero basis in reality? How long can they continue to profit off an illusion while the reality under the illusion festers? How long can they ignore that festering reality and not do anything with their power and attention and authority to try to alleviate it, when it affects communities that Browners, at least, used to be a part of?

“The landlord told me that he’d hold my stuff for two weeks. But when we went back to the apartment to get our stuff, all of our electronics were gone. And somebody had left the door open. My cat was gone. Her name was Kisses. I’d had her since she was two years old. I used to feed her with a bottle. I still have dreams about her.”

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This is one of a series of portraits featuring residents and staff of the Win Homeless Shelter for Women And Children. In addition to providing programs and services aimed at breaking the cycle of homelessness, Win provides shelter for 4500 people across NYC every night, including 2700 children.

NEW VIDEO OF THE NUTRITIONIST, BENEFIT AUCTION

Just posted a new video of my poem The Nutritionist (aka The Madness Vase) bit.ly/Painting_Making_Of  …. Check it out and check out the painting we are auctioning.  All proceeds from the auction will be donated to THE GATHERING PLACE, Denver’s only daytime drop-in center for women, children, and transgender individuals experiencing poverty or homelessness.   Auction details here:  http://www.ebay.com/itm/-/261869480879

“The landlord gave me a deadline of Sunday the 15th. On the 13th, I went to the guidance counselor at my daughter’s school, and she gave me forms for the homeless shelter. My back was against the wall. I didn’t have any other alternatives. Some days it’s OK. But some days I feel helpless and sad. On those days, I think back to the years when everything was going good. My daughter is a blessing. She’s been so strong through all of this. If she see’s that I’m sad, she’ll lay with me, hug me, and make sure I’m OK.”

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This is one of a series of portraits featuring residents and staff of the Win Homeless Shelter for Women And Children. In addition to providing programs and services aimed at breaking the cycle of homelessness, Win provides shelter for 4500 people across NYC every night, including 2700 children.

“Homelessness can be very confusing for children, and it comes with a lot of misconceptions. We try to untangle that confusion as soon as they arrive: ‘No, you’re not a bum. You don’t live in a cardboard box. You don’t stink. Mom is not a bad person. She isn’t crazy. This is not forever.’ We want to undo some of the trauma of homelessness because we don’t want children to view themselves as homeless for the rest of their lives.”

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This is one of a series of portraits featuring residents and staff of the Win Homeless Shelter for Women And Children. In addition to providing programs and services aimed at breaking the cycle of homelessness, Win provides shelter for 4500 people across NYC every night, including 2700 children.

“I want to go back to Virginia. We used to live in a house with two floors. My room was upstairs. We could go outside and play whenever we wanted. My friends always came over. Someone else lives there now.”

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This is one of a series of portraits featuring residents and staff of the Win Homeless Shelter for Women And Children. In addition to providing programs and services aimed at breaking the cycle of homelessness, Win provides shelter for 4500 people across NYC every night, including 2700 children.