home front usa

“The subway rush hour is brought to a standstill in New York City, May 1, 1945 as the report of Hitler’s death was received. The German leader and head of the Nazi Party had shot himself in the head in a bunker in Berlin on April 30, 1945. His successor, Karl Dönitz, announced on German radio that Hitler had died the death of a hero, and that he would continue the war against the Allies.”

(AP)

“These Northwestern University girls brave freezing weather to go through a Home Guard rifle drill on the campus in Evanston, Illinois on January 11, 1942. From left to right are: Jeanne Paul, age 18, of Oak Park, Illinois,; Virginia Paisley, 18, of Lakewood, Ohio; Marian Walsh, 19, also from Lakewood; Sarah Robinson, 20, of Jonesboro, Arkansas,; Elizabeth Cooper, 17, of Chicago; Harriet Ginsberg, 17.”

(AP)

“Officers’ wives, investigating explosions and seeing a smoke pall in distance on December 7, 1941, heard neighbor Mary Naiden, then an Army hostess who took this picture, exclaim "There are red circles on those planes overhead. They are Japanese!” Realizing war had come, the two women, stunned, started toward quarters.“

(AP)

Goodbye Dear, I’ll Be Back in a Year” by Mort Kunstler

Battery C, 2nd Battalion, 189th Field Artillery leave for Fort Sill, Oklahoma in September, 1940, part of the nationwide call-up by President Roosevelt as he mobilized the US military. Intended for year, most would remain in service till 1945, and by the time the US entered World War II, not only would the entire National Guard have been mobilized, but tens of thousands of citizens would be inducted as part of the peacetime draft.

(National Guard)

“Unidentified attaches of the Japanese consulate began burning papers, ledgers and other records shortly after Japan went to war against the U.S., on December 7, 1941, in New Orleans, Louisiana. Police later stopped the fire after most of the papers had been destroyed.”

(AP)