holy-wind

Lisa Lawrence’s Archetypes and Symbols List

Archetypes and Symbols

SITUATION ARCHETYPES

1. The Quest – This motif describes the search for someone or some talisman which, when found and brought back, will restore fertility to a wasted land, the desolation of which is mirrored by a leader’s illness and disability.

2. The Task – This refers to a possibly superhuman feat that must be accomplished in order to fulfill the ultimate goal.

3. The Journey – The journey sends the hero in search for some truth of information necessary to restore fertility, justice, and/or harmony to the kingdom. The journey includes the series of trials and tribulations the hero faces along the way. Usually the hero descends into a real or psychological hell and is forced to discover the blackest truths, quite often concerning his faults. Once the hero is at this lowest level, he must accept personal responsibility to return to the world of the living.

4. The Initiation – This situation refers to a moment, usually psychological, in which an individual comes into maturity. He or she gains a new awareness into the nature of circumstances and problems and understands his or her responsibility for trying to resolve the dilemma. Typically, a hero receives a calling, a message or signal that he or she must make sacrifices and become responsible for getting involved in the problem. Often a hero will deny and question the calling and ultimately, in the initiation, will accept responsibility.

5. The Ritual – Not to be confused with the initiation, the ritual refers to an organized ceremony that involves honored members of a given community and an Initiate. This situation officially brings the young man or woman into the realm of the community’s adult world.

6. The Fall – Not to be confused with the awareness in the initiation, this archetype describes a descent in action from a higher to a lower state of being, an experience which might involve defilement, moral imperfection, and/or loss of innocence. This fall is often accompanied by expulsion from a kind of paradise as penalty for disobedience and/or moral transgression.

7. Death and Rebirth – The most common of all situational archetypes, this motif grows out of the parallel between the cycle of nature and the cycle of life. It refers to those situations in which someone or something, concrete and/or metaphysical dies, yet is accompanied by some sign of birth or rebirth.

8. Nature vs. Mechanistic World – Expressed in its simplest form, this refers to situations which suggest that nature is good whereas the forces of technology are bad.

9. Battle Between Good and Evil – These situations pit obvious forces which represent good and evil against one another; typically, good ultimately triumphs over evil despite great odds.

10. The Unhealable Wound – This wound, physical or psychological, cannot be healed fully. This would also indicate a loss of innocence or purity. Often the wounds’ pain drives the sufferer to desperate measures of madness.

11. The Magic Weapon – Sometimes connected with the task, this refers to a skilled individual hero’s ability to use a piece of technology in order to combat evil, continue a journey, or to prove his or her identity as a chosen individual.

12. Father-Son Conflict – Tension often results from separation during childhood or from an external source when the individuals meet as men and where the mentor often has a higher place in the affections of the hero than the natural parent. Sometimes the conflict is resolved in atonement.

13. Innate Wisdom vs. Educated Stupidity – Some characters exhibit wisdom and understanding intuitively as opposed to those supposedly in charge.

SYMBOLIC ARCHETYPES

1. Light vs. Darkness – Light usually suggests hope, renewal, OR intellectual illumination; darkness implies the unknown, ignorance, or despair.

2. Water vs. Desert – Because water is necessary to life and growth, it commonly appears as a birth or rebirth symbol. Water is used in baptism services, which solemnizes spiritual births. Similarly, the appearance of rain in a work of literature can suggest a character’s spiritual birth.

3. Heaven vs. Hell – Humanity has traditionally associated parts of the universe not accessible to it with the dwelling places of the primordial forces that govern its world. The skies and mountaintops house its gods; the bowels of the earth contain the diabolic forces that inhabit its universe.

4. Haven vs. Wilderness – Places of safety contrast sharply against the dangerous wilderness. Heroes are often sheltered for a time to regain health and resources.

5. Supernatural Intervention – The gods intervene on the side of the hero or sometimes against him.

6. Fire vs. Ice – Fire represents knowledge, light, life, and rebirth while ice like desert represents ignorance, darkness, sterility, and death.

7. Colors

A. Black (darkness) – chaos, mystery, the unknown, before existence, death, the unconscious, evil

B. Red – blood, sacrifice; violent passion, disorder, sunrise, birth, fire, emotion, wounds, death, sentiment, mother, Mars, the note C, anger, excitement, heat, physical stimulation

C. Green – hope, growth, envy, Earth, fertility, sensation, vegetation, death, water, nature, sympathy, adaptability, growth, Jupiter and Venus, the note G, envy

D. White (light) – purity, peace, innocence, goodness, Spirit, morality, creative force, the direction East, spiritual thought

E. Orange – fire, pride, ambition, egoism, Venus, the note D

F. Blue – clear sky, the day, the sea, height, depth, heaven, religious feeling, devotion, innocence, truth, spirituality, Jupiter, the note F, physical soothing and cooling

G. Violet – water, nostalgia, memory, advanced spirituality, Neptune, the note B

H. Gold – Majesty, sun, wealth, corn (life dependency), truth

I. Silver – Moon, wealth

8. Numbers:

A. Three – the Trinity (Father, Son, Holy Ghost); Mind, Body, Spirit, Birth, Life, Death

B. Four – Mankind (four limbs), four elements, four seasons

C. Six – devil, evil

D. Seven – Divinity (3) + Mankind (4) = relationship between man and God, seven deadly sins, seven days of week, seven days to create the world, seven stages of civilization, seven colors of the rainbow, seven gifts of Holy Spirit.

9. Shapes:

A. Oval – woman, passivity

B. Triangle – communication, between heaven and earth, fire, the number 3, trinity, aspiration, movement upward, return to origins, sight, light

C. Square – pluralism, earth, firmness, stability, construction, material solidity, the number four

D. Rectangle – the most rational, most secure

E. Cross – the Tree of life, axis of the world, struggle, martyrdom, orientation in space

F. Circle – Heaven, intellect, thought, sun, the number two, unity, perfection, eternity, oneness, celestial realm, hearing, sound

G. Spiral – the evolution of the universe, orbit, growth, deepening, cosmic motion, relationship between unity and multiplicity, macrocosm, breath, spirit, water

10. Nature:

A. Air – activity, creativity, breath, light, freedom (liberty), movement

B. Ascent – height, transcendence, inward journey, increasing intensity

C. Center – thought, unity, timelessness, spacelessness, paradise, creator, infinity,

D. Descent – unconscious, potentialities of being, animal nature

E. Duality – Yin-Yang, opposites, complements, positive-negative, male-female, life-death

F. Earth – passive, feminine, receptive, solid

G. Fire – the ability to transform, love, life, health, control, sun, God, passion, spiritual energy, regeneration

H. Lake – mystery, depth, unconscious

I. Crescent moon – change, transition

J. Mountain – height, mass, loftiness, center of the world, ambition, goals

K. Valley – depression, low-points, evil, unknown

L. Sun – Hero, son of Heaven, knowledge, the Divine eye, fire, life force, creative-guiding force, brightness, splendor, active awakening, healing, resurrection, ultimate wholeness

M. Water – passive, feminine

N. Rivers/Streams – life force, life cycle

O. Stars – guidance

P. Wind – Holy Spirit, life, messenger

Q. Ice/Snow – coldness, barrenness

R. Clouds/Mist – mystery, sacred

S. Rain – life giver

T. Steam – transformation to the Holy Spirit

U. Cave – feminine

V. Lightning – intuition, inspiration

W. Tree – where we learn, tree of life, tree of knowledge

X. Forest – evil, lost, fear

11. Objects:

A. Feathers – lightness, speed

B. Shadow – our dark side, evil, devil

C. Masks – concealment

D. Boats/Rafts – safe passage

E. Bridge – change, transformation

F. Right hand – rectitude, correctness

G. Left hand – deviousness

H. Feet – stability, freedom

I. Skeleton – mortality

J. Heart – love, emotions

K. Hourglass – the passage of time

CHARACTER ARCHETYPES

1. The Hero – In its simplest form, this character is the one ultimately who may fulfill a necessary task and who will restore fertility, harmony, and/or justice to a community. The hero character is the one who typically experiences an initiation, who goes the community’s ritual (s), et cetera. Often he or she will embody characteristics of YOUNG PERSON FROM THE PROVINCES, INITIATE, INNATE WISDOM, PUPIL, and SON.

2. Young Person from the Provinces – This hero is taken away as an infant or youth and raised by strangers. He or she later returns home as a stranger and able to recognize new problems and new solutions.

3. The Initiates – These are young heroes who, prior to the quest, must endure some training and ritual. They are usually innocent at this stage.

4. Mentors – These individuals serve as teachers or counselors to the initiates. Sometimes they work as role models and often serve as father or mother figure. They teach by example the skills necessary to survive the journey and quest.

5. Hunting Group of Companions – These loyal companions are willing to face any number of perils in order to be together.

6. Loyal Retainers – These individuals are like the noble sidekicks to the hero. Their duty is to protect the hero. Often the retainer reflects the hero’s nobility.

7. Friendly Beast –These animals assist the hero and reflect that nature is on the hero’s side.

8. The Devil Figure – This character represents evil incarnate. He or she may offer worldly goods, fame, or knowledge to the protagonist in exchange for possession of the soul or integrity. This figure’s main aim is to oppose the hero in his or her quest.

9. The Evil Figure with the Ultimately Good Heart – This redeemable devil figure (or servant to the devil figure) is saved by the hero’s nobility or good heart.

10. The Scapegoat – An animal or more usually a human whose death, often in a public ceremony, excuses some taint or sin that has been visited upon the community. This death often makes theme more powerful force to the hero.

11. The Outcast – This figure is banished from a community for some crime (real or imagined). The outcast is usually destined to become a wanderer.

12. The Earth Mother – This character is symbolic of fulfillment, abundance, and fertility; offers spiritual and emotional nourishment to those who she contacts; often depicted in earth colors, with large breasts and hips.

13. The Temptress – Characterized by sensuous beauty, she is one whose physical attraction may bring about the hero’s downfall.

14. The Platonic Ideal – This source of inspiration often is a physical and spiritual ideal for whom the hero has an intellectual rather than physical attraction.

15. The Unfaithful Wife – This woman, married to a man she sees as dull or distant, is attracted to a more virile or interesting man.

16. The Damsel in Distress – This vulnerable woman must be rescued by the hero. She also may be used as a trap, by an evil figure, to ensnare the hero.

17. The Star-Crossed Lovers – These two characters are engaged in a love affair that is fated to end in tragedy for one or both due to the disapproval of society, friends, family, or the gods.

18. The Creature of Nightmare – This monster, physical or abstract, is summoned from the deepest, darkest parts of the human psyche to threaten the lives of the hero/heroine. Often it is a perversion or desecration of the human body.

RECOGNIZING PATTERNS

The following list of patterns comes from the book How to Read Literature Like a Professor by Thomas C. Foster who teaches at the University of Michigan. If you are serious about literary analysis, then it is highly recommended that you buy this book. It goes into detail what is just briefly mentioned and is written in such a lively, witty voice that it does not read like a textbook at all! It will be well worth your time and effort to read it.

Ø  Trips tend to become quests to discover self.

Ø  Meals together tend to be acts of communion/community or isolation.

Ø  Ghosts, vampires, monsters, and nasty people and sometimes simply the antagonists are not about supernatural brew-ha-ha; they tend to depict some sort of exploitation.

Ø  There’s only one story. Look for allusions and archetypes.

Ø  Weather matters.

Ø  Violence and be both literal and figurative.

Ø  Symbols can be objects, images, events, and actions.

Ø  Sometimes a story is meant to change us, the readers, and through us change society.

Ø  Keep an eye out for Christ-figures.

Ø  Flying tends to represent freedom. What do you think falling represents?

Ø  Getting dunked or just sprinkled in something wet tends to be a baptism.

Ø  Geography tends to be a metaphor for the psyche.

Ø  Seasons tend to be traditional symbols.

Ø  Disabilities, Scars, and Deformities show character and theme.

Ø  Heart disease tends to represent problems with character and society.

Ø  So do illness and disease.

Ø  Read with your imagination.

Ø  Irony trumps everything!

Ø  Remember the difference between public and private symbols.

MLA Citation (7th Edition)

Lawrence, Lisa. “Archetypes and Symbols.” West Morris Central High School. West Morris Regional High School District, n.d. Web. 23 Jan. 2013. <http://central.wmrhsd.org/FACULTY…/Archetypesandsymbols.pdf>.

List of Slavic gods and goddesses

As a fellow Slavic person (more specifically Slovak) I’d like to introduce you to the beauty of Slavic history. I see loads of rps that are based on mythology but let’s be real: 99.9% of your mythology rps or mythology plots are about Greek mythology and even though I completely love the fact any kind of mythology is getting more and more recognition it sucks to see other cultures forgotten and overlooked. So I thought I would list the gods and goddesses for you to use instead of overusing Greek ones.

Note: Slavs are members of a group of people in central and eastern Europe speaking Slavic languages and Slavic countries are Russia, Poland, Ukraine, Serbia, Czech Republic, Bulgaria, Belarus, Croatia, Slovakia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Slovenia, Republic of Macedonia, Montenegro.

Keep reading

Falling Stars (3)

Pairing: Slight!kilix modern!oblivious!reader in this one (fem reader btw) (shoot me a pairing!)
Word count: 909 Lmao sorry its so short                                                        Summary; You just wanted a normal day for once but turns out you just can’t and end falling into middle earth and accompanying Thorin’s epic quest        

Other Parts in this story—> (1) (2

————


It was freezing.

No, that had been an understatement. It was fucking cold, and all you had to protect yourself from the clutches of Jack Frost was a pathetic excuse of a blanket. Though, it was your fault you were a living snowman now. It was a spare one Gloín had somehow conjured up and with a great deal of reluctance he gave it to you after trying to swap it with his own newer, better one.

You regretted not taking up Bilbo’s offer when he insisted on sharing his thicker blanket with you now. You clenched your teeth as a shiver racked through your curled up form, a silent swear leaving your frozen lips.

This blows…

Your eyes flicked open and gazed longingly at Bilbo’s form across the camp. He looked warm and cozy. Maybe you could sneak over there? Nah, that was creepy and you’d rather freeze then have him freak out. You glanced at the dimming fire at the center of camp and an idea popped into your head. Of course, that meant you had to get up from your lovely position on the bumpy ground.

Stifling a groan, you managed to roll to your knees and shuffle close to the tiny flames, a few of your joints cracking as you moved. A smile crept onto your lips as thunderous snores echoed around the peaceful camp. Somehow it made you feel at home even if you had just met the boisterous dwarves and gentle Hobbit.

Your cold hands placed another minuscule log to feed the fire in hopes of regaining some feeling back to your fingertips. If there were more light you were positive they’d be blue. Oh well, if your fingers did fall off you could brag about it, much like the others did with their various scars and stories behind them. But loosing a finger to frostbite wasn’t exactly a story worth telling.

“(y/n)?”  

You jumped and toppled over, face landing in the soft earth. You groaned in frustration once you heard a light chuckle.

“I hate you.” You grumbled into the dirt.

Kíli scoffed and rolled his eyes before helping you up into a sitting position. The dark haired dwarf plopped down next to you and elbowed you playfully. “You love me.”

“Do not.” You hissed, biting your lip to keep the smile that threatened to form away. “I like worms more than you.”

“You wound me Ms. (y/n)!” Kíli cried softly, his hands placed over his heart in mock hurt. “I thought we were friends!”

“You wish.” You giggled.

“Mahal, you truly are wicked.”

You chuckled and elbowed him back before a violent shiver rushed through you from a chilly gust of wind. “Holy Balls, it’s cold.”

Kíli smirked and shuffled closer to you, close enough that you could feel his body heat through your blanket and tossed an arm around your shoulder. You couldn’t help but scoot closer under his arm in hopes of stealing some of that wonderful heat Kíli provided.

“You’re like a damn heater.” You mumbled partially to yourself, your numb fingers finding purchase on Kíli’s warm tunic.

“What’s a heater?”

“Um…it’s kinda like a portable fire?” You answered, forgetting  Kíli had no idea about the pleasures of modern technology. Poor dude…

“I wish we had one o’ those.” He said, grinning down at you.

“You and me both, Kee.”

Silence took over the conversation and as you stared into the flickering flames a horrible thought popped into your brain. Kíli must of noticed when your body tensed beside him, his warm chocolate orbs sending a questioning look.

“(y/n), are you alright?”

“W-what if I never get to go home, Kíli?”

Kíli’s brows furrowed slightly. He forgot you were from a world different from his own, you fit right in with all of them that he and the others barely noticed. He squeezed your shoulder and brought you closer to his side. You didn’t protest.

“Then you can live with us, dear (y/n).” He whispered, his goofy grin creeping over his lips. “I’m sure Thorin wouldn’t mind.”

You huffed and shrugged. “No offence, but I don’t think I made the best impression on your Uncle.”

You grimaced as flashbacks of the fateful day you told him he had a stick up his ass. You were surprised when Thorin didn’t drag you out into the forest that night and murder you executioner style. Though, there was still plenty of time for that…

“Bah,” Kíli said, waving off your words, “nonsense.”

“But-”

“Don’t worry about it, (y/n).” Kíli reassured. “If my Uncle refuses, I’ll smuggle you in!”

That did not sound like a good idea.

“I don’t-”

“Will the both of ye shut yer traps?” A certain bald dwarf interrupted. “Ye both talk plenty ‘nough in tha’ day.”

The both of you jumped in surprise and after the initial spook, you both erupted in quiet giggles at waking the Hulk.

After your fit of giggles you reluctantly peeled yourself away from your personal heater, placed a soft kiss on Kíli’s cheek and wandered over to Bilbo’s side, oblivious of the bright red blush that put Clifford the Big Red Dog’s fur to shame on Kíli’s cheeks.

“Night, Kee.” He heard you say after you left his side.

He stuttered out a reply and placed a hand on where you had kissed him. The skin there still tingled and a large smile broke out across his face. No way in Hell would he ever let Thorin kick you out of the Company now…

3

Solemnity of Pentecost – 4 June 2017 – Wishing you all a Holy, Blessed and inspired Pentecost!
The Solemnity of Pentecost is the birthday of the Church:

The Church was made manifest to the world on the day of Pentecost by the outpouring of the Holy Spirit.   The gift of the Spirit ushers in a new era in the “dispensation of the mystery” the age of the Church, during which Christ manifests, makes present, and communicates his work of salvation through the liturgy of His Church, “until he comes.” (CCC, #1076)

Pentecost is not just an isolated feast of the Holy Spirit but an integral feast of the Easter season.   Pentecost is also an elementary feast — not as in getting to back to the basics or beginnings of the Catholic Church but can be described elementary as in the four elements of Aristotle:  earth, wind, fire and water.

Red Easter:  Pentecost closes the Easter season and not in an anticlimactic fashion but in a grand finale.   We so often tend to look at this feast as a separate entity for the Holy Spirit but the Church integrates this feast into the Easter season as a whole. there is significance in the number of days and weeks during the Easter season and in the eyes of the Church, the 50 days are viewed as “one feast day.”   The Italian name for Pentecost, Pasqua rossa (Red Easter) is a great reminder of this connection.

22. The fifty days from the Sunday of the Resurrection to Pentecost Sunday are celebrated in joy and exultation as one feast day, indeed as one “great Sunday.”   These are the days above all others in which the Alleluia is sung.

23. The Sundays of this time of year are considered to be Sundays of Easter and are called, after Easter Sunday itself, the Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Seventh Sundays of Easter. This sacred period of fifty days concludes with Pentecost Sunday.  (From the General Norms of the Liturgical Year and Calendar).

The Descent of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost is closely linked to the feast of the Resurrection, our Passover Feast:

On the day of Pentecost when the seven weeks of Easter had come to an end, Christ’s Passover is fulfilled in the outpouring of the Holy Spirit, manifested, given and communicated as a divine person:  of his fullness, Christ, the Lord, pours out the Spirit in abundance.   On that day, the Holy Trinity is fully revealed. (Catechism of the Catholic Church, #731-732)

In reading the account of Pentecost in the Acts of the Apostles, there is very pronounced imagery.   It is easy to recognise the wind and fire but all four classic elements of Greek philosopher, Aristotle, are present at Pentecost, earth, wind, fire and water.

Wind

First in the account of Pentecost from Acts 2:1-11 came the wind: “And suddenly there came from the sky a noise like a strong driving wind, and it filled the entire house in which they were.”

Most Biblical renderings of the God or the Holy Spirit is through a gentle breath, such as Jesus breathing on the Apostles in the Resurrection appearance in the Upper Room. At Pentecost it is the same room, but here the Holy Spirit comes as wind of strength and power.

There is nothing subtler than the wind, which manages to penetrate everywhere, even to reach inanimate bodies and give them a life of their own.   The rushing wind of the day of Pentecost expresses the new force with which divine love invades the Church and souls (p. 592, In Conversation with God, Volume 2, by Francis Fernandez).

Fire

Next came the fire:  “Then there appeared to them tongues as of fire, which parted and came to rest on each one of them.”   It is this combination of wind and fire that is the gift of tongues.   One of the optional readings for Pentecost is the story of the Tower of Babel. Pius Parsch, as quoted on the Catholic Culture’s Pentecost page, explains that is was the sin of pride that separated and divided those at Babel.   The Holy Spirit brings unity and love, which allows those languages to be spoken and understood by all.

The liturgical color for Pentecost is red, the color of fire and blood and the symbol of love.   The last time we have seen red vestments outside of the feasts of martyrs or apostles is Palm Sunday and Good Friday.   The red for those days recalled the blood of Christ.   Today the red recalls the tongues of fire and we ask the Holy Spirit to ignite our hearts, just as we pray:

Come, Holy Spirit, fill the hearts of thy Faithful; and enkindle in them the fire of Thy love….

“In medieval times, many churches had a “Holy Ghost Hole”, a small circular opening in the ceiling of the church.   The holes would be decorated on Pentecost, with various items symbolising the Holy Spirit lowered through the hole.   This practice calls to mind the elements of wind and fire. Father Francis Weiser describes the tradition (emphasis mine):

In medieval times the figure of a dove was widely used to enact in a dramatic way the descent of the Holy Spirit on Pentecost Sunday.   When the priest had arrived at the sequence, he sang the first words in a loud and solemn voice:   Veni Sancte Spiritus (Come, Holy Ghost).   Immediately there arose in the church a sound “as of a violent wind blowing” (Acts 2, 2).   This noise was produced in some countries, like France, by the blowing of trumpets;  in others by the choir boys, who hissed, hummed, pressed windbags, and rattled the benches.   All eyes turned toward the ceiling of the church where from an opening called the “Holy Ghost Hole” there appeared a disc the size of a cart wheel, which slowly descended in horizontal position, swinging in ever-widening circles.   Upon a blue background, broken by bundles of golden rays, it bore on its underside the figure of a white dove.

Meanwhile the choir sang the sequence.   At its conclusion the dove came to rest, hanging suspended in the middle of the church.   There followed a “rain” of flowers indicating the gifts of the Holy Spirit and of water symbolizing baptism. In some towns of central Europe people even went so far as to drop pieces of burning wick or straw from the Holy Ghost Hole, to represent the flaming tongues of Pentecost.   This practice, however, was eventually stopped because it tended to put the people on fire externally, instead of internally as the Holy Spirit had done at Jerusalem.   In the thirteenth century in many cathedrals of France real white pigeons were released during the singing of the sequence and new around in the church while roses were dropped from the Holy Ghost Hole (Weiser, Holyday Book).

Except for the burning bits, some of these practices have been revived in these older churches.   In parts of Italy and Sicily, red rose petals are dropped through the hole.   This is an especially spectacular sight in the church in Rome dedicated to St. Mary and the Martyrs that was formerly the Pantheon. There is an opening in the dome and the rose petals are dropped, filling the church and covering the floor.

Red and fire are the dominant images used in Pentecost celebrations.   In many places of the Northern Hemisphere, this is height of strawberry season and the red fruits shapes like tongues of fire seem perfect for the feast day that falls in the warmer months.”

Earth

The earth element doesn’t seem to be as obvious with the connection more as it relates to God’s creation.   Pentecost, which means “Fiftieth Day” in Greek, was a Jewish festival marking the 7 weeks or 50 days after the Passover.   It was a harvest festival, offering the first fruits in thanksgiving to God.   Later the feast also commemorated the giving of the Law or Ten Commandments to Moses at Sinai.   Our civilization has become less agrarian but this “earth element” should be a universal reminder to us as respect and thanksgiving for creation.   Pope Benedict explains and elaborates:

“From its earliest prehistory [Pentecost] has been a feast of harvest. In Palestine the crops were ripe in May; Pentecost was the thanksgiving for the grain harvest.   Man sees the fruitfulness which results from the interplay of heaven and earth as the miracle by which he lives and he acknowledges that gratitude is the appropriate response to this miracle….Has this become meaningless today?   If we think of “Holy Spirit” only in terms of Christian inwardness and of “harvest” only in terms of technology and commerce, our view of the world has become schizophrenic.   At Pentecost the church prays a verse from the psalms which runs:  Send forth your Spirit, O Lord, and renew the face of the earth.   Initially this refers to the creative Spirit which has called the world into being and maintains it in being.   It is important to have a new reality of this at Pentecost: the Holy Spirit who came down upon the apostles is the same Spirit who fashioned the world….”

Against this background we must also understand that, in Israel, Pentecost was the remembrance of the arrival at Sinai and the celebration of the Covenant which had set out a path for Israel to travel in the form of the law.   Christians have always seen their Pentecost as a continuation of this idea:  the New Law is love, breaking down barriers and uniting people in the New Covenant. Love, too, is not formless or arbitrary;  it is a formation from within, a wakefulness of the heart which takes up the rhythm of creation and perfects it. (Seek That Which is Above, 79-81)”

Water

The final element, water, is not an image of the Holy Spirit but a direct result of the coming of the Paraclete upon the Disciples.   After they were filled with the Holy Spirit, they left the Upper Room and began to proclaim the Gospel.   And on hearing their words, 3000 were baptised that day.  The matter of baptism is water.

From the very day of Pentecost the Church has celebrated and administered holy Baptism.   Indeed St. Peter declares to the crowd astounded by his preaching:  “Repent, and be baptised every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins; and you shall receive the gift of the Holy Spirit.”

26. The apostles and their collaborators offer Baptism to anyone who believed in Jesus: Jews, the God-fearing, pagans.   27 Always, Baptism is seen as connected with faith:  “Believe in the Lord Jesus and you will be saved, you and your household,”   St. Paul declared to his jailer in Philippi.   And the narrative continues, the jailer “was baptised at once, with all his family” (CCC, #1226)

With every baptism comes the reminders of the first Pentecost. Today is also a good feast to celebrate our reception of the sacraments of baptism and confirmation.  ( Jennifer Gregory Miller)

Come O Holy Spirit!

2

Somewhere in the world it’s still the correct time for Digifake week’s theme: Mythical Beast

i honestly cannot thank @calament enough for her help and endless patience!!!! 

Name: Hermanubimon (from Hermanubis, god from classical mythology combined from Hermes and Anubis)
Level: Perfect
Type: Holy Beast
Attribute: Vaccine
Field: Wind Guardians, Virus Busters
Main evolution: from Wolpetinmon with crest of Hope to Feyethermon
Other options*: (sorted by occurrence)
From - D’Arcmon, Pegasmon, Coatlmon, Nefertimon, Sangloupmon, Dobermon, Prairiemon, Sagittarimon, Goatmon, Harpymon, Moosemon
To - Anubimon, Mercurymon, Valdurmon, Holydramon, Valkyrimon, Hououmon, Lotusmon, Sleipmon, Quinglongmon, Baihumon, AncientSphinxmon

*Many evolution routes are possible however digimon that actually do evolve into Hermanubimon are quite rare and even less evolve further…

The one on the top is how Hermanubimon really looks and the bottom one is an alternate version? when powered up??? idk but i bought this softest fabric and i have a hard time letting it go, so here.. In any case, despite his canine body type, his fur is actually very sheep-like.

Attacks:
Caduceus snakebite: Unwraps his 3 tails and uses them as a whip.
Wepet-er : All the “eyes” on his ears open and he creates a ball of holy light above his head that strikes his foes.
Peseskhaf slash: Slashes the opponent with his sharp claws on his front or hind legs.  
Souls guidance : The ear-eyes all open and leave a shining turquoise trail behind them that can be used as a rope to bind his foes for example. (Not unlike Pegasmon’s or Nefertimon’s Sanctuary Bind) 

The digimojis on the earrings say wpt-r, that hopefully being the Egyptian term for the Opening of the mouth ceremony. There is also ‘Caduceus’ written on the golden tail and ‘Digital monster’ on both holy rings. 

As you can probably tell i tried to include quite a few references to Hermes and Anubis as well as Anubimon and Mercurimon, there is more of them, more subtle :3c

From St. Seraphim of Sarov (The Little Russian Philokalia Vol. 1; St. Herman of Alaska Brotherhood pgs. 93-94):

“On the day of Pentecost our Lord solemnly sent down to the disciples in a tempestuous wind the Holy Spirit in the form of tongues of fire which alighted on each of them and entered within them and filled them with the fiery strength of divine grace which breathes bedewingly and acts gladdeningly in souls which partake of its power and operations (cf. Acts 2:1-4). And this same fire-infusing grace of the Holy Spirit which was given to us all, the faithful of Christ, in the Sacrament of Holy Baptism, is sealed by the Sacrament of Chrismation on the chief parts of our body as appointed by the Holy Church, the eternal keeper of this grace. It is said: ‘The seal of the gift of the Holy Spirit.’ On what do we put this seal if not on vessels containing some very precious treasure?”