holocaust museum in washington

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US Holocaust Museum’s “early warning signs of fascism” sign is going viral

  • The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum wants to make sure that fascism doesn’t make a comeback. 
  • A Twitter user snapped a shot of a poster from somewhere inside the Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C. 
  • Judging by dollar sign symbol in the lower right hand corner, the sign looks to be a poster for sale. 
  • The poster is derived from a 2003 article detailing the potential warning signs of an incoming fascist regime. Read more.

The Holocaust museum never really leaves you.

It’s been weeks and sometimes I fall back into memories of the silence, the dark oppression of the train car, the way I reached the end of the exhibit and discovered I had been all alone.

It’s like falling, always, tripping in your sleep, heavy on your conscience. 

When I finished the tour, I was trembling, on the verge of collapse. I had somehow gotten separated from my group, so I was trying and failing to hold myself together. The last rooms involve “clean-up” and the images were so horrific I wanted to scream. I went sprinting through the Hall of Remembrance, crying, almost running into people, when I spotted someone I knew near the gift shop. She started to say something, but I just latched onto her, buried my face into her shoulder, and sobbed for a long, long time.

I didn’t really realize how terrible this mass genocide was. We learn about it over and over in history class, but six million dead is nothing. Six million is just a number, and not only that - it’s something too big to fathom. It’s statistics, dates, mechanical repetition of how they were outcasted, treated, killed. It’s nearly as systematic as the actual event was.

The museum strips you of that formality. I am haunted now by faces, histories crowding into my subconscious at random times during the day. People.

Six million people.

I hope I never get over it.

A nation builds museums to understand its own history and to have its history understood by others, to create a common space and language to address collectively what is too difficult to process individually. Forty-eight years after World War II, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum opened in Washington. A museum dedicated to the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks opened its doors in Lower Manhattan less than 13 years after they occurred. One hundred and fifty years after the end of the Civil War, however, no federally funded museum dedicated to slavery exists, no monument honoring America’s slaves. “It’s something I bring up all the time in my lectures,” says Eric Foner, a Columbia University historian and the author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning “Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery.” “If the Germans built a museum dedicated to American slavery before one about their own Holocaust, you’d think they were trying to hide something. As Americans, we haven’t yet figured out how to come to terms with slavery. To some, it’s ancient history. To others, it’s history that isn’t quite history.”
—  David Amsden, “Building the First Slavery Museum in America,” featured in The New York Times.
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Went to the Holocaust Museum in DC.

They have a special exhibit- Some Were Neighbors: Collaboration and Complicity in the Holocaust that I wish the world could see. It talked about how civilians reacted towards the slow build up of atrocities, leading to the murder of millions. The exhibit posed pertinent questions to the viewers about how people could get to that level of complicity; what would you have done, and other such provocative questions.

It meant a lot to me, because that’s what I try to expose through my writing, to break down the ideas that people are just born good or evil, as if the nazis sprung up out of nowhere and blindsided an otherwise oblivious world. Seriously, if I could just throw that whole exhibit into a single Foreward XD

Forty-eight years after World War II, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum opened in Washington. A museum dedicated to the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks opened its doors in Lower Manhattan less than 13 years after they occurred. One hundred and fifty years after the end of the Civil War, however, no federally funded museum dedicated to slavery exists, no monument honoring America’s slaves.