hollywood stuntman

Above: Salvador Dalí painting St. John of the Cross

Photo: Daniel Farson



From Wiki: “Christ of Saint John of the Cross is a painting by Salvador Dalí made in 1951. It depicts Jesus Christ on the cross in a darkened sky floating over a body of water complete with a boat and fishermen. Although it is a depiction of the crucifixion, it is devoid of nails, blood, and a crown of thorns, because, according to Dalí, he was convinced by a dream that these features would mar his depiction of Christ. Also in a dream, the importance of depicting Christ in the extreme angle evident in the painting was revealed to him.

The painting is known as the Christ of Saint John of the Cross, because its design is based on a drawing by the 16th-century Spanish friar John of the Cross. The composition of Christ is also based on a triangle and circle (the triangle is formed by Christ’s arms; the circle is formed by Christ’s head). The triangle, since it has three sides, can be seen as a reference to the Trinity, and the circle may be an allusion to Platonic thought. The circle represents Unity: all things do exist in the "three” but in the four, merry they be.

On the bottom of his studies for the painting, Dalí explained its inspiration: “In the first place, in 1950, I had a ‘cosmic dream’ in which I saw this image in colour and which in my dream represented the 'nucleus of the atom.’ This nucleus later took on a metaphysical sense; I considered it 'the very unity of the universe,’ the Christ!” In order to create the figure of Christ, Dalí had Hollywood stuntman Russell Saunders suspended from an overhead gantry, so he could see how the body would appear from the desired angle and also envisage the pull of gravity on the human body. The depicted body of water is the bay of Port Lligat, Dalí’s residence at the time of the painting.“ (via: wiki)



Above: A preparatory drawing for Christ of St. John of the Cross (Christ On The Cross From Top Perspective)






Above: The sketch that inspired Dalí. Crucifixion by St. John of the Cross, c. 1550

Saint John of the Cross had a vision while praying. The vision led to the drawing of Christ from above.

Saint John of the Cross (born Juan de Yepes y Álvarez) (1542– 14 December 1591) was a Spanish mystic, a Roman Catholic saint, a Carmelite friar.





Above: Dali painting St. John of the Cross - Photo: by Daniel Farson



Christ of St. John of the Cross, 1951, Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum, Glasgow - Salvador Dali



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‘Filmed over a period of 4 years in 18 different countries, Tarsem’s The Fall is an unforgettable movie experience. In 1920s Los Angeles, Alexandria (Catinca Untaru), a 5-year-old girl hospitalized from a fall, strikes up an unlikely friendship with Roy, a Hollywood stuntman shattered by a near-fatal movie set accident and his lover’s betrayal. To pass the time, he tells Alexandria the epic story of Governor Odious and the 5 remarkable heroes determined to defeat him – a dazzling world of magic and myth. Only when the line between reality and fantasy begins to dissolve does Alexandria realize how much is truly at stake. Presented by David Fincher (Fight Club) and Spike Jonze (Adaptation), The Fall is an awe-inspiring, cinematic tour de force.’

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Buster Keaton, for instance, protested to the end of his days that he had no notion of what his admirers were talking about when they spoke, as Andrew Sarris did, of his “cerebral” qualities, or when they detected a pervasive surrealism in his films that - considering the period in which the films were made - virtually placed him in the avant-garde.  "I was just trying to get laughs" was his constant and stubborn answer to questions.  Keaton was, in fact, a brilliant analyst of film, as his dazzling film-within-a-film in Sherlock Jr. indicates: the sequence illustrates basic theories of continuity and cutting more vividly and with greater precision than theorists themselves have ever been able to do.  But the analysis is not in Keaton’s head.  It is in the film.  He went past cerebration and worked only with the thing itself, creating what amounts to theory out of his body, his camera, his fingers, a pair of scissors.  Art is often something done before it is something thought: Keaton’s impulses were not only stronger but more accurate than any verbal formulation he might have chosen to offer for them.  

- Walter Kerr on film artist Buster Keaton, The Silent Clowns, Alfred A. Knopf: New York, 1975, p. 98

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Leap Of Faith: Damien Walters Backflip Over Speeding Formula E Car

NOW WATCH THE 360-DEGREE VERSION! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Uv64…

Freerunner, gymnast and Hollywood stuntman Damien Walters is no stranger to danger. With movie credits including Captain America, Skyfall and Assassin’s Creed, Damien’s performed in some of the most mind-blowing action sequences you’ve seen on screen.

Damien proposed his dream stunt to us - could he stand facing away from a Formula E car as it approaches from behind, and then perform a blind backflip over the car as it passes below? We present to you this perfect synchronisation of highly-tuned man and machine: The Leap Of Faith.

#FELeapOfFaith

The Walking Dead halts production after an accident that killed stuntman John Bernecker
AMC has suspended production on The Walking Dead following an on-set accident that has left a stunt performer dead. John Bernecker died on July 13 of a head injury sustained in a fall that occurred the previous day, while shooting an episode of The Walking Dead’s eighth season on the show’s set in Atlanta. Bernecker had worked as a Hollywood stuntman since 2009, including on such films as Logan and The Fate of the Furious. Read more
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For silentweeks

Buster’s dive and ending to Hard Luck (1921) as found on some DVDs.

Just days away from the Oscars, Hollywood continues to face down questions over its lack of diversity — particularly among the nominees for its top prize. The controversy has helped prompt a viral hashtag, #OscarsSoWhite, and has led the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to pledge to diversify in years to come.

For some African-Americans who have been in Hollywood for decades, though, this is a familiar story. Willie Harris and Alex Brown, two black stuntmen who first tried to break into the movie business in the 1960s, quickly realized that studios wouldn’t hire black stuntmen.

For 2 Black Stuntmen Breaking Into Hollywood, ‘You Were Subject To Get Hurt’

Photo: Luisa Conlon for StoryCorps

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“Hollywood Stuntman feat. Yoshi Sudarso,” by way of LookbookTV!