hod*

“Malcut is the shrivelled wet and living body of the baby. From this moment on it begins its journey back to Kether containing the whole Tree, as Kether is in Malcut, but this Tree will not perhaps be seen outwardly, except over the years as the person grows back up it again. The first stage is the path between Malcut and Yesod—babyhood. In this period not only is the body rapidly increasing its volume, but it is also soaking up internal and external information. From Hod it absorbs through its senses the smells, sounds, tastes, and sights of its mother. Touch is perhaps the most important sensor, with temperature and comfort playing an important part in forming a contribution to its world image in Yesod. Netzah adds to the picture, the baby slowly recognising the daily rhythm and response of the parent who comes running to its every call. Later, as the Yesodic image is extended beyond intimate bodily exploration and reaction to internal cycles, the baby begins to push out its sensory field, throwing things from its bed as part of the programme for studying height and distance. By the be- ginning of childhood (each Sephiric stage blends into the next) the baby has begun to control its functions, walk and speak; all the faculties of physical Hod.”

- Z'ev ben Shimon Halevi; TREE OF LIFE - An Introduction to the Cabala

Opens tonight, Sept 11, 6-8p:

Once Everything Was Much Better Even The Future
 Nir Hod

Paul Kasmin Gallery, 515 W27th St., NYC

exhibition of painting and sculpture features a large sculptural work, a snowglobe containing a moving scale model of a pumpjack encased in oil and swirling “snow” comprised of gold-colored flakes, a reflection of the immense wealth generated by the oil trade. Characteristic of Hod’s work is a dark glamour that is both alluring and menacing, exemplified in his three new series of paintings. In I Want Always to be Remembered in Your Heart, smoldering flames are superimposed on delicate flowers, alluding to the paradoxical coexistence of beauty and destruction. - thru Oct 25