hobbit stills

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So were re-watching the LotR trilogy (again) & I noticed Legolas recycling bits of his dad’s old quotes.

Well obviously, I know Return of the King was released first. But it’s interesting that they’d have Thrandy use the same phrase to describe the threat of Mordor in DoS. It makes it look like Leggy is echoing his father’s words when you re-watch RotK.

anonymous asked:

Do you have any thoughts on Dwarf babies?

Oh boy I have lots of thoughts about dwarf babies ALL THE TIME

Dwarf babies are colloquially called Pebbles and are small with fuzzy pudgy cheeks!

Parents carry them around in slings when they’re very little and often keep them nearby when working on their crafts. The babies get comfort by holding onto their parents’ beards or hair, and they like to grab noses when they’re in reach. 

(They also tend to headbutt things in reach when they get the strength for it)

Dwarves raising pebbles tend to have quite good support from others when caring for them, especially within extended families and guilds. Bearers of pebbles are highly respected for crafting life like Mahal the Maker crafted the first dwarves. 

As pebbles grow, the first craft they learn (or at least try) tends to be that of a parent or other family member, because they are around them when they work.

(Contrary to popular belief, dwarf babies do not spring from the ground or the stone. The misconception that the Dwarven reproduction rate is so low is held by other races because not many outsiders ever get to SEE dwarf babies. Dwarves tend to raise their children in the mountains where it’s safe)

Concerning Hobbits (of Color)

Okay it’s been a whole day and I’m still angry about that hobbit casting thing, so let’s lay down some Tolkien canon here.

Fact 1: Per Tolkien, there were originally three races of hobbit. The Stoors were a small group, they were broad and stocky, they grew facial hair, they liked rivers, and their skin color is not specified, so Tolkien probably meant them to be white (but there’s no reason they have to be, since again, not specified). The Fallohides were a tiny group, they were thin, pale and tall, they were bold and good with languages, and they like trees. The Harfoots were the distinct majority, they lived in holes, they had hairy feet, and they were brown. Tolkien is super clear on this. He explicitly calls out Harfoots as having browner skin than other hobbits when describing the races and he uses phrases like “nut-brown skin” and “long brown fingers” when describing specific hobbits to back it up.

Fact 2: Britain planted its ravenous imperial flag firmly in the soil of India three centuries before Tolkien wrote The Hobbit. He knew what a brown person looked like. He would know he was not evoking a slightly darker shade of Caucasian when he said a person had brown skin.

Fact 3: Bilbo, Frodo, and all of their friends are aristocracy. Sam is the only hobbit we ever meet who is an actual laborer. In Tolkien’s time, laborers worked in the sun and middle class and aristocracy stayed inside where there was something resembling temperature control. Apart from Sam and Aragorn, no one in the Fellowship (or Company) ever voluntarily got a sunburn. If Tolkien talks about brown skin he’s talking about brown skin, not a farmer’s tan.

Where does this leave us?

Well, Tolkien says that after colonizing the Shire, the three hobbit races mingled more closely and became one. This leaves us with two options.

Option A: He’s talking about that thing that sci-fi writers sometimes do where “everyone is mixed race.” So all three races would have smeared together into a single uniform color. What color? Mostly Harfoot, aka brown. The “strong strain of Fallohide” in the Tookish and Brandybuck lines means maybe they’re white-passing, but in this scenario all hobbits are brown.

Option B: He’s talking about a more melting-pot scenario where visual racial distinctions still exist but everyone lives side-by-side in a fairly uniform culure. The Tooks/Brandybucks having a “strong strain of Fallohide” means that they are themselves remaining strains of Fallohide, and are straight-up white. Merry, half Took and half Brandybuck, is thus white (possibly part Stoor, given Brandybuck comfort with water); Pippin, half Took and half Banks, is either white or biracial. The Baggins family, sensible owners of the oldest and most venerable hobbit-hole anyone knows of, are blatantly Harfoot, making Bilbo and Frodo (half Took and half Brandybuck respectively) also biracial. Fallohides being exclusively adventurous high-class types, and the Gamgees being staid low-class homebodies with a distrust of moving water, Sam is obviously Harfoot and thus completely brown. (Smeagol, a Stoor, is probably white, but as discussed above, doesn’t have to be.) In this scenario, a minimum of three of five heroic hobbits are various shades of brown, four out of five of them could be, and most background hobbits are brown.

In conclusion, if you think all hobbits are white, you are canonically wrong. If you geek out over Aragorn wearing the Ring of Barahir, rage about Faramir trying to take the Ring, and do not even notice, much less complain, that Sam, Bilbo and Frodo are being erroneously portrayed by white guys, you need to reexamine the focus of your nerdery.

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“Legends of Tomorrow's season finale enters its last week of production today.”

What on earth is happening in the finale if J.R.R TOLKIEN is going to be in it

Dís was a member of the royal line of the House of Dúrin, the sister of Thorin Oakenshield and the mother of Fíli and Kíli. Like her surviving family, she was driven into exile in the Blue Mountains after the dragon Smaug sacked Erebor, then only 10 years old. 

She is the only known named Dwarf-woman.