hk 91

2

PTR-32 Gen II

Second generation PTR model chambered in 7.62x39. You can differentiate the Gen I and Gen II by the barrel profile and handguard length. Gen I’s followed an HK 33/93 pattern, whereas the Gen II’s are an HK 91/G3 pattern but with a shorter heavier non-tapered barrel. Supposedly the Gen II’s will accept and use a wider variety of AK magazines but no drums unless you cut open the mag well. (GRH)

3

On 28 February, 1997, Larry Phillip Jr. and Emil Mătăsăreanu entered the North Hollywood Bank of America, armed with two Norinco Type 56 S rifles that they had converted into fully automatic, a fully automatic Norinco Type 56 S-1, a semi automatic HK-91, a fully automatic Bushmaster (M16) XM15 Dissipator and approximately 3,300 rounds of ammunition. The two men were also somewhat prepared for the aftermath as they were wearing bulletproof vests and homemade body armour. They also manufactured a bomb and placed it in their car to destroy any evidence. The two men had prepared for this moment, even monitoring police transmission to estimate how long it would take them to arrive to the bank once called. They didn’t prepare for the scenario which took place - as they were entering the bank,two LAPD officers spotted them and called for backup. Phillips and Mătăsăreanu forced the patrons and staff to the ground as they ordered the manager to open the safe; they left with $303,305.

Outside, a number of officers had positioned themselves behind their cars with their weapons drawn and facing toward the bank doors. When Phillips and Mătăsăreanu exited with their loot, they engaged in gunfire with the officers, whose arsenal and armour could not compare to that of the bank robbers. A number of officers and civilians were harmed in the gunfire which lasted approximately eight minutes before Mătăsăreanu jumped into their white sedan in an attempt to make a getaway, urging Phillips to do the same. Instead, Phillips retrieved a HK-91 from the trunk of the car and continued to fire at the surrounding officers. After suppressing the officers, Phillips made his way to the passenger side of the car but was stopped when a shotgun blast penetrated his wrist. He responded by backing away from the car and ensuing in more gunfire. The SWAT team, who were more prepared, arrived 18 minutes after the initial gunshots. 

By now, the tyres of the sedan had been shot out and Mătăsăreanu and Phillips were separated. Phillips continued to fire at authorities and was shot in the hand, causing him to drop the gun. He picked the pistol up and shot himself under the chin; as his body slumped down, he was shot in the back of the neck. Mătăsăreanu on the other hand, attempted to carjack a car just a few blocks from where Phillips had died. Unable to start the car, Mătăsăreanu took cover and shot at authorities. Noticing his legs were unprotected by armour, authorities shot at him from underneath the car, shooting him over 20 times. Mătăsăreanu died on the ground due to the trauma.  Mătăsăreanu and Phillips had fired approximately 1,100 rounds in what became infamously known as the North Hollywood Shootout. The shootout was aired live on television. 

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HK 91

Civilian model of the German G3, they were available on the U.S market for a number of years before importation and production ended. The one in the photos has the rather rare “Namibian” stock, which is patterned after the FAL’s stock. The owner/seller kind of crippled the value by doing a camouflage paint job. (GRH)

4

Top folder…

Although the rifle is an HK 91, the stock is actually a very rare experimental top folding model for the Spanish CETME. Not too many were made and even fewer made it across to the U.S. 

As you can see, the stock has a very short length of pull and poor cheek weld. If the stock were any longer, it would overlap and interfere with the ejection port. 

4

Steyr AUG

Older pre-ban model of the Austrian bullpup chambered in 5.56x45mm. Has an interesting camouflage pattern on the stock and one magazine, which the seller mentions may or may not be a factory applied finish. I’m leaning towards non-factory; most of the early pre-ban AUG’s I’ve seen did not have camouflage finishes but its not to say a few handfuls weren’t done that way. Classic example is H&K sold a limited number of “Jungle” and “Desert” camouflage patterned HK 91′s and 93′s. (GRH)

2

HK 94

Civilian model of the legendary MP5, this HK 94 was converted by the owner into an MP5K of sorts. Obviously now its an SBR (Short Barreled Rifle) but this is also why HK 94′s are quite rare and expensive in comparison to the HK 91 and HK 93. Majority of the HK 94′s out there have been SBR’ed, getting rid of the heinous 16″ barrel that made it legal in most states. (GRH)

PTR 32 Gen II

The 7.62x39mm variant of the G3/HK 91. Currently on its 2nd generation, it is supposed to accept a wider variety of AK magazines, which was an issue with the older PTR 32′s. They seem to run fine with most current production polymer AK mags like the Magpuls ones, but some owners still have problems with certain metal surplus mags. (GRH)

4

PTR 91 KFM4

U.S made clone of the HK 91, the PTR 91 KFM4 has an adapter that allows for the installation of most standard AR-15 stocks. It adds a nice ergonomic touch since you have a wider array of stock options, even if the combination looks a bit odd. You could go a step further and buy the lower trigger group housing that uses AR-15 pistol grips. (GRH)

2

HK SR9 TC

A rare variant of the HK 91 that is a bridge between the actual sniper rifle models like the MSG90 and PSG1. The SR9 TC uses the PSG1 stock, pistol grip and trigger group. However it does not have a reinforced receiver or the free floating heavy barrel. Though collectable they are sometimes used as PSG1 clone build platforms. If you watched the movie “Sniper” starring Billy Zane, this is the rifle he uses. (GRH)

2

HK91

Civilian model of the German HK G3, the 91 is chambered in 7.62x51/.308. They are notorious for destroying brass. That can be alleviated by installing a port buffer which can help reduce the dents to the brass. Original HK91′s can be quite costly because of their collector status but you can pick up quality made U.S clones for under $1,000. (GRH)

PTR-32

U.S made rifle based on the HK 91 but chambered in 7.62x39mm. Heckler & Koch did produce a rifle in that caliber but it never went into mass production for military service. PTR had discontinued the PTR 32 but recently announced a Gen 2 model that will now accept a wider range of AK magazines, along with a different barrel profile. (GRH)