hiv is not the end

“gay marriage is legal, what more do YOU PEOPLE want????”

so many things, thanks for asking!

  • an end to conversion therapy for gay and trans youth
  • repeal of laws which legalize discrimination against lgbt+ people if it’s derived from “sincerely held religious beliefs”
  • recognition and protection for lgbt+ people on the international stage
  • reduction in the rates of suicide, depression, and homelessness among lgbt+ people
  • to be able to google ‘lesbian’ without seeing pornography
    • an end to the sexualization and fetishization of lgbt+ people in general, particularly wlw and transwomen
  • legislation to add workplace protections for trans and gay people in all 50 states
  • repeal of “bathroom bills” that bar trans folk from using the appropriate rest rooms
  • recognition and remembrance for the countless individuals who died from HIV/AIDS and repartitions for the survivors
  • an end to the “gay panic” and “trans panic” defenses
  • media representation that doesn’t end with the characters’ deaths

marriage equality was not the finish line.

She told me that there was a note for me, that was left behind
She had left it there waiting, for such a long time
I was inclined to ask about it but she brought it up first
I saw a tear swelling up in her eye, and then she cursed
She told me where the letter was and I started thinking the worst
Reversed my position, stepped over and opened the door
And sure enough there was an envelope with my name on the floor
“Nobody loves you more than me carino” is what the letter said

“By the time you get to read this, I’ll probably be dead
But when you left in ‘97 a part of me went to Heaven
I thank God at least I got to know what love really was
But it hurt me, to see what true love really does
‘Cause even though we never made love, you were all that there was
It was because I loved you so much that I had to make you leave
You made me doubt the way I thought, you made me want to believe
And then I slipped up, and I let you get close to me
It was hard to not be openly when people spoke to me
This was not the way I thought my life was supposed to be
Baby don’t you see, I had a blood transfusion that left me with HIV
Hoped the end exists for me since late in 1993
I died a virgin, I wish I could’ve given myself to you
I cried in the hospital because there was no one else but you
Promise that you’ll meet me in paradise inevitably
No matter what, I’ll keep your love forever with me”



What happened for the rest of the day is still a blur
But I remember wishing that I was dead, instead of her
She was buried on August 3rd
The story ends without a sequel
And now you know why Technique, don’t fucking fall in love with people
Hold the person that you love closely if they’re next to you
The one you love, not the person that’ll simply have sex with you
Appreciate them to the fullest extent, and then beyond
'Cause you never really know what you got, until it’s gone
—  You Never Know by Immortal Technique

Also, while I was writing that post, an instrumental from Beauty and the Beast came on and made me think of Howard Ashman, for whom I have more feelings than I think anyone should strictly have for someone they’ve never met. He’s one of those celebrity losses I’ve never recovered from (Carrie Fisher is going to be another, I can tell). And it’s because he meant a lot to me.

In case you didn’t know, he wrote the music and lyrics for The Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast, and parts of Aladdin along with Alan Menken. The longing to escape a world of oppression into a place that accepted you for who you truly were inside that you hear in those lyrics? “What would I give to live where you are / What would I pay to stay here beside you / What would I do to see you smiling at me / Where would we walk / Where would we run / If we could stay all day in the sun”? “And for once it might be grand to have someone understand / I want so much more than they’ve got planned”?

Those lyrics were written by a gay man with HIV/AIDS living in one of the most virulently homophobic eras of our time. It’s hard to imagine if you haven’t lived in the kind of meanness and cruelty that was commonplace at the time (and is still common in some areas of the country/world). It’s hard to imagine if you aren’t, yourself, queer. But you can hear the longing in those lines. It’s why both of those movies have come to mean something more to me in recent years, being able to look back and see the inherent queerness in the narrative, even if the characters weren’t themselves queer.

He found out he had HIV/AIDS toward the end of The Little Mermaid, became very, very sick during Beauty and the Beast, and died right before the final version of the film was released. But while they were working on BATB, when he’d just found out he had AIDS, back when it was an unequivocal death sentence, he went to Walt Disney World with a friend. WDW had a parade celebrating the release of The Little Mermaid, as they do, and he started crying watching the parade because he looked around and he saw children in love with Ariel, in love with the songs she was singing, the music he wrote, and he said he knew that even though he was going to die, his music was going to live on and mean something to people.

idk, it’s hard to remember that even as recently as 2010, which is when I was writing gay romance, it was almost impossible to imagine the world we live in now. And I’m not talking about “now” when Mike Pence and his ilk are trying to make us afraid to be ourselves again, when conservatives are fighting for the right to discriminate against us. I’m talking about the now when they have to try to do these things, when they have to fight to get away with it. because dude, when I was growing up, that was just how things were.

I think about if Howard Ashman could see how far we’ve come. I hope that somehow he knows. And I swear to God we’re never going back.

LGBTQ+ Movies of 2016: Part 4 (Short Films)

Let Us End with It Too

When Sarah realizes that she may be falling out of love with her partner, Jessica, she withdraws into herself in order to face her emotions and interpret them before acting on the initial presence of the potentially detonative thought.

The Ace

After being diagnosed HIV positive, a young high school teacher must confront a concerned parent to maintain his dignity and find acceptance within himself and from those around him.

The Cricket and the Ant (La Cigale et la Fourmi)

A forbidden relationship between a student and her french teacher shows how passionate and exciting but also how complicated and painful love can be.

Acceptance Part 1

Acceptance is a dark short film that touches on the difficulty of telling the people you love your secret of what and who you truly are.

(Be)longing

At a typical New York high school, social outcast Leilani Reeves faces bullying from Rylee Floyd and other popular girls due to her shyness and sexuality. She forms an unexpected bond with physical education teacher Misha King, who defends Leilani and shares experiences and difficulties from her own life as a gay mother. The two separately face Rylee’s continuous antagonism until sudden moments of conflict and intimacy bring the three women together and reveal either desperation or reconciliation.

Sunset Trail

After two men meet on an earthquake-stricken trail, they must make their way back to civilization. On the way, they start to see more in each other than just friends, and are forced to make a decision: will they part ways, or let their love grow?

American Male

A gritty look at how gender norms make it hard for us to be who we really are.

Chalk

After a horrible gymnastics injury, a young, insecure, teenager has a glimpse into her future as she comes to terms with her sexuality.

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 5

2

Bi-partisan co-chairs of Congressional HIV/AIDS Caucus urge Trump to take action to end epidemic

  • Throughout his campaign and tenure as president thus far, Donald Trump has remained relatively mum on the issue of HIV/AIDS. 
  • But in a letter sent to the president on Tuesday, the co-chairs of the Congressional HIV/AIDS Caucus urged him to continue decades of effort to make battling the epidemic a public health priority at the federal level.
  • “As co-chairs of the bipartisan and bicameral Congressional HIV/AIDS Caucus, we write to encourage you to continue the long-standing American commitment to the fight against HIV/AIDS, both here at home and abroad,” the letter, signed by Reps. Barbara Lee (D-Calif.) and Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-Fla.), reads.
  • “The Trump administration has a simple choice to make,” Lee said in a statement to Mic. "The United States can either continue building on our bipartisan legacy on HIV/AIDS, or we can retreat from our leadership in the world.“      
  • In the letter, Lee and Ros-Lehtenin call on Trump to continue support for the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief — a federal initiative created by former President George W. Bush — which they laud for increasing the number of people receiving treatment for the deadly disease by "nearly 11.5 million” over the last two decades. Read more (3/14/17 4:09 PM)

anonymous asked:

2/2 it isn't. Additionally, if someone transmits HIV to someone else, there's already statute on assault and negligence that would make that prosecutable. I agree that you definitely should tell all partners if you have HIV, because what if you grow to like them and want to see them more? What if they find out from a 3rd party? It's just the best policy. But that can be difficult to navigate irl- difficult to keep your status private information, risk of assault, risk of loss of livelihood, etc.

I see your argument, but I do not agree with you and I do not apologize for my viewpoints.  I keep coming back to this anon and shutting down my computer in sincere frustrating because I feel so strongly on this matter.  I’m not trying to criminalize any individual for having HIV thrust upon them, no matter what circumstance.  Getting an STD can happen to anyone, at any time, no matter how many or how little people you have slept with.  I do not find myself better than anyone who is HIV+ and I am not a serophobic individual.  STDs do not discriminate and hold some false superior sexual justice and punishment ruling.

But with what has happened to me with herpes and having my choice taken away, I do not see any excuse that makes it okay to play God with another person’s health and mental well being, and to me, this bill is justifying exactly that.  

Add on to the fact that say someone who is HIV+ has sex with me, a herpes + woman, and doesn’t disclose because it is no longer a felony.  Having herpes puts me at a greater risk for acquiring HIV which does not end well.  So when you’re talking about slim chances and low viral loads, it doesn’t matter, it still can affect and put me along with millions of other herpes +/immunocompromised individuals at a greater risk for a life shortening virus.  From what I’ve researched (And please, if anyone can give me actual evidence that I have nothing to worry about), HIV medication does not work on herpes positive individuals.  It is a big fucking deal if you don’t disclose to me.  It is a big fucking deal if you don’t disclose to whoever you have sex with.  I do not respect any individual who consciously has sex with another and hides important sexual health information which could impact another.  Fuck your feelings, I am not sorry.  I deal with rejections all the time and I am not comparing herpes to HIV here.  But this is not something I am okay with and if that offends you, you can unfollow.  

It’s a stressful time for me. I don’t much like the rotation I’m on- it’s an hour drive each way and nothing I am learning is pertinent to what I want to do. I have to present my research next month and I am just feeling like it’s going to be a disaster because my patients keep no showing and so I haven’t finished data collection. I have an HIV presentation at the end of the month, of which I know nothing about. And I’ve been applying to 1-3 jobs every weekend since January and still have only heard good news from one place. I actually have an interview with them onsite in two weeks and I’m really hoping things go well. I can’t go to my biggest stress relief, running, because of my injury.

So even though I look like I have my shit together, please know that I struggle and life is a little challenging right now and that’s okay.

Victoria Beckham’s letter to her 18 years old self.

Dear Victoria,

I know you are struggling right now. You are not the prettiest, or the thinnest, or the best at dancing at the Laine Theatre Arts college. You have never properly fitted in, although you are sharing your Surrey school digs with really nice girls. You have bad acne. You think the principal has put you at the back of the end-of-year show (in a humiliatingly bright purple Lycra leotard) because you are too plump to go at the front. (This may or may not be true.)

There is a red telephone box outside the school and you have just rung your parents, crying, “I can’t do this, I miss home, I’m not good enough.” And Mum has told you to come home. “We’ll go to Lakeside and buy a new pair of shoes,” she said. It’s tempting. But then Dad got on the phone: “Stay there, prove everyone wrong.” If you’d listened to Mum, you would be going to Lakeside. (Shoes are important, just not right now.) It would be theeasy solution. And I’m writing to jolly you along, to offer consolation and encouragement, and to tell you, aged 18, to be strong.

You haven’t forgotten being bullied at school, have you? Do you recall that first day at secondary school? Most children were wearing their own coats and had the latest cool bag, but not you. Kitted out in the full St Mary’s High School uniform, you stood in the freezing playground while other teenagers walking past threw soggy tissues and old Coke cans that they plucked from the puddles. But the thick skin that you developed then is already standing you in good stead, and it will do so for the rest of your life.

Your complexion will sort itself out (in fact you will launch your own make-up brand); as soon as the Eighties are over, your perm will die down, and your weight will settle itself. At school you eat Super Noodles and boxes of Frosties because they say they are fat free, and you will endure many other silly fad diets (including an addiction to green juices). Instead, learn to embrace your imperfections – that is what I want to tell you. Let your skin breathe; wear less make-up. (And don’t ever let that make-up artist shave your eyebrows! The effects last forever.) You will always be addicted to Elnett hairspray but you will tone it down. Less of the “Hello! I just got stuck in a wind tunnel”, please. And I should probably say, don’t mess with your boobs. All those years I denied it – stupid. A sign of insecurity. Just celebrate what you’ve got.

Do answer an ad in The Stage, looking for candidates to form a new girl band. Line up around the block and audition to change your life. You love musicals – Miss Saigon, Cats, Starlight Express and Les Misérables – so you will perform “Mein Herr” from Cabaret, while everyone else sings a Madonna song. You haven’t yet heard of the internet or electronic mail or smartphones. Nor have you perfected the art of the selfie for Instagram (you can’t even turn on a computer right now, and Dad still drives to London to send a telex). But one day you will find that audition performance again online, and at the same time discover that your name brings up 47,800,000 search results on Google.

The judges of the competition will match you to four other girls, all misfits in their own ways. Together you will make it OK to look different. And, as the Spice Girls, you will sell 75 million records. You cannot possibly imagine your future life right now. You will travel on private planes, visit incredible countries, stay in fantastic hotels. (At the beginning, you will steal the hotel mini shampoos, shower gels and conditioners, but you soon realise that they leak in your suitcase – often disastrously.) You will storm into people’s offices, leap on to tables in hotels and go crazy (although you will also be the one checking that the table isn’t going to collapse). You will meet Nelson Mandela, Mariah Carey and Elton John. But please, I implore you, keep a diary. There will be so many amazing moments, and you will forget.

There will also be down days and bad days. You will often be so busy that you will be in a different country every day. And being young and a bit silly, you’ll complain and sit in hotel rooms and moan about being tired. Go out and see the country where you are. Go to galleries, go to museums. Soak up the culture. You are lucky to be there. If you don’t join the Spice Girls, you might always be that insecure person in that little shell, and you will never become who you truly are. With this in mind, be kind, be polite, be considerate of others’ feelings, because I know that every one of us would sit here now and say they’re not the main culprit, but we didn’t fully appreciate each other a lot of the time. So practise what you preach when you sing “friendship never ends”, and celebrate everyone’s uniqueness.

You are going to have so much fun with your clothes – PVC catsuits; chokers that say absurd things; weird spiky blonde hair. It will never occur to you that you appear ridiculous. You will turn up at awards ceremonies resembling a drag queen. But I look back at you and smile. It will add interest to your life to go from one extreme to another. I love the fact that you will feel free to express yourself. Fashion will take on added stature one day, but try not to be stifled by it. You will learn, as you mature, to swap heels for Stan Smith trainers, minidresses for crisp white shirts. And you will never be one of those people who just roll out of bed. Wear sunglasses a lot. Even inside. Especially at airports. They turn a nothing-outfit into something quite pulled together and cool. You are going to really like Aviators. (Then one day you will develop your own!)

On boyfriends and lasting love: learn more about football, especially the offside rule. And yes, love at first sight does exist. It will happen to you in the Manchester United players’ lounge – although you will get a little drunk, so exact details are hazy. While the other football players stand at the bar drinking with their mates, you will see David standing aside with his family. (He’s not even in the first team at this stage – you are the famous one.) And he has such a cute smile. You, too, are close to your family, and you will think how similar he feels to you. He’s going to ask for your number. (He still has the London-to-Manchester plane ticket on which you wrote it.) I’m afraid that most of your first dates will be in car parks, which is not as seedy as it sounds. It is because your manager, Simon Fuller, will warn you, “Don’t let anyone see you out together or you’ll get hounded.” At the time, you won’t understand why.

You are going to be very, very famous, both for the band you form and because of the man you marry, and then later for a fashion business you will launch in your own name. You will get used to fame. Although you cannot set a price on losing privacy, you will learn to use celebrity to your advantage. For good things. For charity. One day you will have the privilege to campaign on behalf of the United Nations to end mother-to-child transmission of HIV and Aids in Africa. And people will listen. Changes will happen. That is not to say you won’t be affected by what you see of yourself in the press. It will hurt you when people comment on your weight. It will continue to upset you whatever age you are, because we women are very tough on ourselves.

The paparazzi will become part of your life, their long lenses waiting. Some are nice, some not. They may make your children cry, or they may give you a compliment – but you will not be able to control every image they publish. When you are pregnant with Brooklyn, they will snap you sitting by the pool at the Four Seasons Hotel in Los Angeles in a black-and-white bikini, and the picture will make the front page of a British newspaper. It is an unkind shot and so upsetting that for the rest of the tour you will barely leave your hotel or sit outside. And I’m the same now. Do I relax on the beach in a bikini? No. I am still hugely self-critical, and because of that I can be a little uptight. My 60-year-old self would probably say the same thing to me as I am telling you now: enjoy yourself a little more. Be less image-conscious. Learn to relax. You are going to make mistakes – of course you are. You will be super-super-successful, but you will find out that you can lose it all much more quickly than you can earn it. That is a hard lesson to learn. Collectively, I now see, the Spice Girls were victims of our own success, believing we could do anything, that the sky was the limit, that we could do it all on our own. You will learn from that, and when you have another opportunity you will not lose it again.

On being a mother: once you are a parent, you worry. And you are going to have four, so that’s a lot of worry! Mum likes to say, “You might be 42, but I still worry about you.” Children mean that you will be constantly tired and will develop big bags under your eyes. Your children will always come first, but never forget who you are and what you want to achieve. Is it possible to have it all? To be a successful working mother? You will hear this question asked by many women as you grow older. What you will realise is that by working hard, yet always putting family first, it will be possible to achieve that balance. Nothing will be perfect, but it is only now that I have learnt to appreciate all I have and all I have been blessed with. I am happy.


A word on school sports day: never wear platform heels and flares if you have to take part in the mothers’ race. And never believe another mum when she says she will stick with you at the back of the race. Because she won’t. And when they announce, “It’s the taking part that counts,” it’s not. It’s all about winning. You will shout at home but never at work. Be a nice boss. Ultimately, go with what you think, but don’t smother those who are talented. (If they are not, then admittedly I get frustrated – I’m not very tolerant.)

On marriage: have patience. Bite your tongue. Be supportive. And preserve a bit of mystique. Never let yourself go completely (at least brush your hair, clean your teeth, have a bit of a brow going on because you will always want him to look at you and feel attracted). Always make time for each other. Because if you don’t, everything will revolve around the children and I’m not sure how sexy that is! And do not forget the person you fell in love with. You will follow your man around the world, moving from Manchester to Spain, and then America. In Spain you will revel in watching him enjoy some of his best footballing days. Spain is also where you will lay the foundations for your own fashion brand by collaborating with others on denim and sunglasses.

But I need to warn you: a lot of your time there will be really hard. I’m not afraid to say now what a horribly difficult time it was. People will say awful things. You will be a laughing stock. Every time you turn on the television or look at a newspaper it will seem as though someone is having a go at you and your family. You will learn how mean other women can be. (And it will teach you always to support the women around you, to take them on a journey with you.) Others would crack under the pressure, but you won’t. Use that time to close off, to focus, work hard and protect the children. In relationships people will throw obstacles in your way, and you either manoeuvre around them or you trip up. You will never discuss with David how many children you both want; you don’t say to each other, “Where shall we live?” You don’t discuss any of that because you will be young and in love. Even when you don’t necessarily want the same thing, your support for each other will mean that you will stick together and grow up together. And it will be worth it.

Most days, you will look at your life and think, “Wow! I was never the one who was supposed to get all this.” I want to tell you that I still feel that way now. Recently I was in New York for the British Vogue cover shoot in a penthouse at the Carlyle hotel. I looked out of the window and I could see the sun shining and all the yellow cabs below and I pinched myself. You are going to have many of those moments. Don’t take them for granted.

anonymous asked:

Most of said laws are based on an exaggerated fear and don't consider that there's numberous forms of protection and treatment which prevent transmission, biting and spitting are some of the least likely ways of infection, and that most HIV+ positive people don't intend to transmit the virus. The laws also end up discouraging people who may be HIV+ from being tested or receiving treatment and disportionally target the LGBT+ and POC. 2/2 (Was that really so hard for the other anon to do)

Thank you!!! Very informant!!!!

Just realising all the ironic plot twists in House:
There are the obvious ones,
- House, a diagnostician, is misdiagnosed
- Wilson, an oncologist, gets cancer
But then there’s:
- Foreman, a neurologist, gets brain damage
- Cameron, an immunologist, almost gets infected with HIV
- Chase, an intensivist, ends up in the ER and ICU for both anaphylaxis and a stab wound

Anyways being a *** ****** is great because ik if i get raped or tricked and end up hiv+ these white kids will talk on and on about how i deserve it for my lifestyle and you cant hold their preciousu mike pence accountable for defunding every major source of help available to at risk populations. Really makes you think jimbo

For the third year in a row, we partnered with @housingworksbookstore​ for Independent Bookstore Day to run a Hidden Face Photo Booth with bookstore supporters. We’ll be posting pictures of enthusiastic readers all day!

Housing Works is a healing community of people living with and affected by HIV/AIDS. Their mission is to end the dual crises of homelessness and AIDS through relentless advocacy, the provision of lifesaving services, and entrepreneurial businesses that sustain those efforts. For more, please visit www.housingworks.org.

For the third year in a row, we partnered with @housingworksbookstore​ for Independent Bookstore Day to run a Hidden Face Photo Booth with bookstore supporters. We’ll be posting pictures of enthusiastic readers all day!

Housing Works is a healing community of people living with and affected by HIV/AIDS. Their mission is to end the dual crises of homelessness and AIDS through relentless advocacy, the provision of lifesaving services, and entrepreneurial businesses that sustain those efforts. For more, please visit www.housingworks.org.

California officials frequently cite possession of black literature, left-wing materials, and writing about prisoner rights as evidence of gang affiliation. In the dozens of cases I reviewed, gang investigators have used the term “[BGF] training material” to refer to publications by California Prison Focus, a group that advocates the abolition of the SHUs; Jackson’s once best-selling Soledad Brother; a pamphlet said to reference “Revolutionary Black Nationalism, The Black Internationalist Party, Marx, and Lenin”; and a pamphlet titled “The Black People’s Prison Survival Guide.” This last one advises inmates to read books, keep a dictionary handy, practice yoga, avoid watching too much television, and stay away from “leaders of gangs.”

The list goes on. Other materials considered evidence of gang involvement have included writings by Mumia Abu-Jamal; The Black Panther Party: Reconsidered, a collection of academic essays by University of Cincinnati professor Charles Jones; pictures of Assata Shakur, Malcolm X, George Jackson, and Nat Turner; and virtually anything using the term “New Afrikan.” At least one validation besides Pennington’s referenced handwritten pages of “Afro centric ideology.”

As warden of San Quentin Prison in the 1980s, Daniel Vasquez oversaw what was then the country’s largest SHU. He’s now a corrections consultant and has testified on behalf of inmates seeking to reverse their validations. As we sat in his suburban Bay Area home, he told me it is “very common” for African American prisoners who display leadership qualities or radical political views to end up in the SHU. Similarly, he recalls, “we were told that when an African American inmate identified as being Muslim, we were supposed to watch them carefully and get their names.”

Vasquez testified in federal court in the case of a former inmate, Ernesto Lira, who was gang validated in part based on a drawing that included an image of the huelga bird, the symbol of the United Farm Workers. While the image has been co-opted by the Nuestra Familia prison gang, Vasquez testified that it is “a popular symbol widely used in Hispanic culture and by California farmworkers.” Lira’s validation was one of a handful to ever be reversed in federal court—though not until after he was released on parole, having spent eight years in the SHU. And though the court ruled that the huelga bird is of “obscure and ambiguous meaning,” it continues to be used as validation evidence.

Evidence used to send inmates to solitary indefinitely includes possession of books like Sun Tzu’s The Art of War and Machiavelli’s The Prince.
Gang evidence comes in countless forms. Possession of Machiavelli’s The Prince, Robert Greene’s The 48 Laws of Power, or Sun Tzu’s The Art of War has been invoked as evidence. One inmate’s validation includes a Christmas card with stars drawn on it—alleged gang symbols—among Hershey’s Kisses and a candy cane. Another included a poetry booklet the inmate had coauthored with a validated BGF member. One poem reflected on what it was like to feel human touch after 14 years and another warned against spreading HIV. The only reference to violence was the line, “this senseless dying gotta end.”

“Direct links” that appear in inmates’ case files are often things they have no control over, like having their names found in the cells of validated gang members or associates or having a validated gang affiliate send them a letter, even if they never received it or knew of its existence. Appearing in a group picture with one validated gang associate counts as a direct link, even if that person wasn’t validated at the time.

In the course of my investigation, I obtained CDCR’s confidential validation manual. It teaches investigators that use of the words tío or hermano, Spanish for uncle and brother, can indicate gang activity, as can señor. Validation files on Latino inmates have included drawings of the ancient Aztec jaguar knight and Aztec war shields, and anything in the indigenous Nahuatl language, spoken by an estimated 1.4 million people in central Mexico.

Some SHU inmates, aside from the “bona fide gang members,” are those “the guards don’t like,” says Carbone, Pennington’s lawyer. “They get annihilated with gang validations in order to get them off the main lines…The rules are so flimsy that if the department wants somebody validated, he will get validated.”