hiv in africa

3

“I’m ecstatic to be an ambassador for my godmother Elizabeth Taylor’s AIDS Foundation. She was a real badass, and I admire what she’s created. I think it’s beautiful. But, for me, it’s more the cause that I really care about, not just the name attached to it. … I kind of knew what I was getting into when I went to Malawi last month with ETAF to visit some of the people most affected by HIV and AIDS. It was my first time there, but I wasn’t afraid. Everyone in the villages was so welcoming, especially the kids. We saw a lot of joy despite all of the health issues, which was beautiful.

Paris Jackson on being an ambassador for the Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation and her recent trip to Malawi.

bbc.com
Ghana import 30 million condoms but dem no use am - BBC News
Ghana AIDS Commission dey worry say people no dey too like to use condom.

“But e be like say people no dey use dem. Ghana AIDS Commission dey worry say people no dey too like to use condom.” 

Population: Exploding
AIDS: Spreading
Condoms: dey no like to use dem

This new BBC African branch is really an eye-opener.

In 1997 the South African government passed a law setting up, among other things, a marketplace for medicines based on affordable prices. Clause 15c relied on two practices agreed under the World Trade Organisation’s guidelines.

One, compulsory licensing, allows businesses in a country in a state of emergency to manufacture generic products paying only a royalty to the patent owner. The second, parallel importing, lets a nation import drugs made more cheaply in one country than in another.

Patent rights for the HIV cocktail would cost the South African health service an inconceivable $10,000 per Aids patient. Using the mechanisms under Clause 15c would reduce the costs by between 50 and 90 percent.

But the legislation was labelled ‘piracy’ by Pharma - the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America. This is a formidable alliance of the nation’s 100 biggest drugs companies. They claimed the South African law would violate patents and undermine profits on which research depended.

For a battle against a government led by the world’s most popular leader, Pharma needed political clout, and chose a consultancy called Podesta .Com.

It chose well. What was formerly Podesta Associates was founded by two brothers from Chicago, John and Anthony, and rated by Washingtonian magazine among the top 20 lobbying groups in the capital.

Both men were heavy-hitting Democrats, both had the President’s ear and were especially close to Gore. Both were members of President Clinton’s transition team when he took office in 1992. John remained at the White House, later becoming Chief of Staff, while Tony streamlined the company. ‘We Help You Change Outcomes’ was his slogan.

The Clinton administration, with John Podesta as Chief of Staff, went to war over South Africa’s anti-Aids drive. Trade Representative Charlene Barshevsky denied South Africa tariff breaks on its exports to the US. Gore told Nelson Mandela to his face that the US would not tolerate the legislation.

South Africa refused to back down, and the pharmaceutical companies intervened directly. They sued: led by Pharma, the massive Bristol Myers Squibb from the US, Britain’s SmithKline Beecham and Glaxo (through its South African subsiduary), Germany’s Bayer, Roche of Switzerland, France’s Rhne-Poulenc and a host of others.
bbc.com
South African child 'virtually cured' of HIV - BBC News
The nine-year-old has no active HIV in the body after catching the infection at birth.

The child caught the infection from their mother around the time of birth in 2007. They had very high levels of HIV in the blood.

Early antiretroviral therapy was not standard practice at the time, but was given to the child from nine weeks old as part of a clinical trial.

Levels of the virus became undetectable, treatment was stopped after 40 weeks and unlike anybody else on the study - the virus has not returned.

Early therapy which attacks the virus before it has a chance to fully establish itself has been implicated in child “cure” cases twice before.

In 2011, 39 year old Prisca enrolled as a patient in the MSF HIV/AIDS project in Zimbabwe. She was diagnosed with HIV in 2008 and became pregnant by her second husband in 2010, whom she had met at the project. She named her daughter, Shamiso and gave birth in January of 2011. In Shona, one of the widest spoken languages in Zimbabwe, Shamiso means ‘miracle’. And a miracle she was. When tested, Shamiso’s tests came back with a result that truly shocked Prisca – HIV negative. Because of that, Prisca even thought of having a second child with her husband.

Now Shamiso is 5 years old and is a fully healthy and functioning child, even attending school. 

“I had not known about MSF’s HIV program before I went and got tested but when I tested positive, I followed all the instructions I was given, but I still thought my child would be HIV positive. I had lost all hope but I got assistance and through that, I was able to give birth to an HIV negative child.”

Victoria Beckham’s letter to her 18 years old self.

Dear Victoria,

I know you are struggling right now. You are not the prettiest, or the thinnest, or the best at dancing at the Laine Theatre Arts college. You have never properly fitted in, although you are sharing your Surrey school digs with really nice girls. You have bad acne. You think the principal has put you at the back of the end-of-year show (in a humiliatingly bright purple Lycra leotard) because you are too plump to go at the front. (This may or may not be true.)

There is a red telephone box outside the school and you have just rung your parents, crying, “I can’t do this, I miss home, I’m not good enough.” And Mum has told you to come home. “We’ll go to Lakeside and buy a new pair of shoes,” she said. It’s tempting. But then Dad got on the phone: “Stay there, prove everyone wrong.” If you’d listened to Mum, you would be going to Lakeside. (Shoes are important, just not right now.) It would be theeasy solution. And I’m writing to jolly you along, to offer consolation and encouragement, and to tell you, aged 18, to be strong.

You haven’t forgotten being bullied at school, have you? Do you recall that first day at secondary school? Most children were wearing their own coats and had the latest cool bag, but not you. Kitted out in the full St Mary’s High School uniform, you stood in the freezing playground while other teenagers walking past threw soggy tissues and old Coke cans that they plucked from the puddles. But the thick skin that you developed then is already standing you in good stead, and it will do so for the rest of your life.

Your complexion will sort itself out (in fact you will launch your own make-up brand); as soon as the Eighties are over, your perm will die down, and your weight will settle itself. At school you eat Super Noodles and boxes of Frosties because they say they are fat free, and you will endure many other silly fad diets (including an addiction to green juices). Instead, learn to embrace your imperfections – that is what I want to tell you. Let your skin breathe; wear less make-up. (And don’t ever let that make-up artist shave your eyebrows! The effects last forever.) You will always be addicted to Elnett hairspray but you will tone it down. Less of the “Hello! I just got stuck in a wind tunnel”, please. And I should probably say, don’t mess with your boobs. All those years I denied it – stupid. A sign of insecurity. Just celebrate what you’ve got.

Do answer an ad in The Stage, looking for candidates to form a new girl band. Line up around the block and audition to change your life. You love musicals – Miss Saigon, Cats, Starlight Express and Les Misérables – so you will perform “Mein Herr” from Cabaret, while everyone else sings a Madonna song. You haven’t yet heard of the internet or electronic mail or smartphones. Nor have you perfected the art of the selfie for Instagram (you can’t even turn on a computer right now, and Dad still drives to London to send a telex). But one day you will find that audition performance again online, and at the same time discover that your name brings up 47,800,000 search results on Google.

The judges of the competition will match you to four other girls, all misfits in their own ways. Together you will make it OK to look different. And, as the Spice Girls, you will sell 75 million records. You cannot possibly imagine your future life right now. You will travel on private planes, visit incredible countries, stay in fantastic hotels. (At the beginning, you will steal the hotel mini shampoos, shower gels and conditioners, but you soon realise that they leak in your suitcase – often disastrously.) You will storm into people’s offices, leap on to tables in hotels and go crazy (although you will also be the one checking that the table isn’t going to collapse). You will meet Nelson Mandela, Mariah Carey and Elton John. But please, I implore you, keep a diary. There will be so many amazing moments, and you will forget.

There will also be down days and bad days. You will often be so busy that you will be in a different country every day. And being young and a bit silly, you’ll complain and sit in hotel rooms and moan about being tired. Go out and see the country where you are. Go to galleries, go to museums. Soak up the culture. You are lucky to be there. If you don’t join the Spice Girls, you might always be that insecure person in that little shell, and you will never become who you truly are. With this in mind, be kind, be polite, be considerate of others’ feelings, because I know that every one of us would sit here now and say they’re not the main culprit, but we didn’t fully appreciate each other a lot of the time. So practise what you preach when you sing “friendship never ends”, and celebrate everyone’s uniqueness.

You are going to have so much fun with your clothes – PVC catsuits; chokers that say absurd things; weird spiky blonde hair. It will never occur to you that you appear ridiculous. You will turn up at awards ceremonies resembling a drag queen. But I look back at you and smile. It will add interest to your life to go from one extreme to another. I love the fact that you will feel free to express yourself. Fashion will take on added stature one day, but try not to be stifled by it. You will learn, as you mature, to swap heels for Stan Smith trainers, minidresses for crisp white shirts. And you will never be one of those people who just roll out of bed. Wear sunglasses a lot. Even inside. Especially at airports. They turn a nothing-outfit into something quite pulled together and cool. You are going to really like Aviators. (Then one day you will develop your own!)

On boyfriends and lasting love: learn more about football, especially the offside rule. And yes, love at first sight does exist. It will happen to you in the Manchester United players’ lounge – although you will get a little drunk, so exact details are hazy. While the other football players stand at the bar drinking with their mates, you will see David standing aside with his family. (He’s not even in the first team at this stage – you are the famous one.) And he has such a cute smile. You, too, are close to your family, and you will think how similar he feels to you. He’s going to ask for your number. (He still has the London-to-Manchester plane ticket on which you wrote it.) I’m afraid that most of your first dates will be in car parks, which is not as seedy as it sounds. It is because your manager, Simon Fuller, will warn you, “Don’t let anyone see you out together or you’ll get hounded.” At the time, you won’t understand why.

You are going to be very, very famous, both for the band you form and because of the man you marry, and then later for a fashion business you will launch in your own name. You will get used to fame. Although you cannot set a price on losing privacy, you will learn to use celebrity to your advantage. For good things. For charity. One day you will have the privilege to campaign on behalf of the United Nations to end mother-to-child transmission of HIV and Aids in Africa. And people will listen. Changes will happen. That is not to say you won’t be affected by what you see of yourself in the press. It will hurt you when people comment on your weight. It will continue to upset you whatever age you are, because we women are very tough on ourselves.

The paparazzi will become part of your life, their long lenses waiting. Some are nice, some not. They may make your children cry, or they may give you a compliment – but you will not be able to control every image they publish. When you are pregnant with Brooklyn, they will snap you sitting by the pool at the Four Seasons Hotel in Los Angeles in a black-and-white bikini, and the picture will make the front page of a British newspaper. It is an unkind shot and so upsetting that for the rest of the tour you will barely leave your hotel or sit outside. And I’m the same now. Do I relax on the beach in a bikini? No. I am still hugely self-critical, and because of that I can be a little uptight. My 60-year-old self would probably say the same thing to me as I am telling you now: enjoy yourself a little more. Be less image-conscious. Learn to relax. You are going to make mistakes – of course you are. You will be super-super-successful, but you will find out that you can lose it all much more quickly than you can earn it. That is a hard lesson to learn. Collectively, I now see, the Spice Girls were victims of our own success, believing we could do anything, that the sky was the limit, that we could do it all on our own. You will learn from that, and when you have another opportunity you will not lose it again.

On being a mother: once you are a parent, you worry. And you are going to have four, so that’s a lot of worry! Mum likes to say, “You might be 42, but I still worry about you.” Children mean that you will be constantly tired and will develop big bags under your eyes. Your children will always come first, but never forget who you are and what you want to achieve. Is it possible to have it all? To be a successful working mother? You will hear this question asked by many women as you grow older. What you will realise is that by working hard, yet always putting family first, it will be possible to achieve that balance. Nothing will be perfect, but it is only now that I have learnt to appreciate all I have and all I have been blessed with. I am happy.


A word on school sports day: never wear platform heels and flares if you have to take part in the mothers’ race. And never believe another mum when she says she will stick with you at the back of the race. Because she won’t. And when they announce, “It’s the taking part that counts,” it’s not. It’s all about winning. You will shout at home but never at work. Be a nice boss. Ultimately, go with what you think, but don’t smother those who are talented. (If they are not, then admittedly I get frustrated – I’m not very tolerant.)

On marriage: have patience. Bite your tongue. Be supportive. And preserve a bit of mystique. Never let yourself go completely (at least brush your hair, clean your teeth, have a bit of a brow going on because you will always want him to look at you and feel attracted). Always make time for each other. Because if you don’t, everything will revolve around the children and I’m not sure how sexy that is! And do not forget the person you fell in love with. You will follow your man around the world, moving from Manchester to Spain, and then America. In Spain you will revel in watching him enjoy some of his best footballing days. Spain is also where you will lay the foundations for your own fashion brand by collaborating with others on denim and sunglasses.

But I need to warn you: a lot of your time there will be really hard. I’m not afraid to say now what a horribly difficult time it was. People will say awful things. You will be a laughing stock. Every time you turn on the television or look at a newspaper it will seem as though someone is having a go at you and your family. You will learn how mean other women can be. (And it will teach you always to support the women around you, to take them on a journey with you.) Others would crack under the pressure, but you won’t. Use that time to close off, to focus, work hard and protect the children. In relationships people will throw obstacles in your way, and you either manoeuvre around them or you trip up. You will never discuss with David how many children you both want; you don’t say to each other, “Where shall we live?” You don’t discuss any of that because you will be young and in love. Even when you don’t necessarily want the same thing, your support for each other will mean that you will stick together and grow up together. And it will be worth it.

Most days, you will look at your life and think, “Wow! I was never the one who was supposed to get all this.” I want to tell you that I still feel that way now. Recently I was in New York for the British Vogue cover shoot in a penthouse at the Carlyle hotel. I looked out of the window and I could see the sun shining and all the yellow cabs below and I pinched myself. You are going to have many of those moments. Don’t take them for granted.

youtube

“Bearing witness is a form of action.”

Writer and activist Sisonke Msimang shares her story about the power of listening.

“It was when my husband passed away that I found out that I was HIV positive. I got it from him. I was happy before then and didn’t suspect anything when I married him. I have never heard of HIV before that. When the doctor told me that I carried the virus, my whole world shattered and came crashing down, my future immediately became blank. I became powerless and hopeless. Instantly, I belonged to an ostracised group. My mother, the woman that birthed me, abandoned me the minute she heard I had the disease. Whether out of guilt or shame, I don’t know, but it broke my heart. The same for my siblings. Everyone reacts differently when they discover that you have HIV, but the most common ones that observed were shock, anger, sadness, and fear. I suddenly felt alone in this world. I slept rough; fortunately, there were some generous souls that provided me with a temporary shelter, but it was short-lived because of pressure from their relatives. People fear the unknown and things that they don’t understand. No one knows what tomorrow will bring, and God has sent down both disease and its cure, and I’ve come to accept that. I’m happy to be alive even though I’m sick and alone. I’m hopeful now that we will find the cure. My situation has improved, and I’ve received enormous support from the Somali community – especially those informed about the disease. I’ve realised that I’m not alone and that there are many like me.”

(Burao)

“Ninkayga marku geeriyooday baan ogaaday inaan qabo cudurka halista ah ee HIV. Isaga ka qaaday. Runti, farxad baan ku noola ka hor, oo waan iska guursaday anigoo shaki qabin. Weligey ma maqlin cudurka la yiraahdo HIV ka hor. Marku dhakhtarka ii sheegay inaan qabo xanuunka, nolosha waan ka quustay, mustaqbalkaygi wuxuu noqday mid mugdi soo galay. Durba waxaan la kulmay takoorid. Xitaa hooyaday iyo walaalahay baa iga cararay markii la igu ogaaday cudurkaas. Ma garanayo inee ceeb awgeed iga carareen iyo in kale, laakin qalbigeyga xasuus murugaleh ku reebtay. Waxaan dareemay kalinimo, naxdin, cabsi iyo caro badan. Guri la’aan baan noqday. Nasiib wanaag waxaa jiray hadana weli jira shaqsiyaad ii caawiyey oo meel aan si kumeel gaar ah aan u seexdo i siiyey laakin cadaadis badan bey markasta kula kulmi jireen dadka kale iyo ehelkoodaba. Dhibaatada jirta waxa weeye, dadka waxay ka cabsadaan wax aysan garanayn. Weli waan ku faraxsanahay inaan noolahay oo Ilaahay baa mahad leh inkastoo xanuunkas ii hayo. Ilaahey ayaa balanqaadey in cudur walba oo dunida yaala uu daawo leeyahey mana ogid beri waxa aad la kulmi karto, waan aqbalay. Waan ku rajo weynahay in daawadiisa la helay hadu Alle idmo. Xaaladayda way so hagaagaysa oo tageero badan baan ka helay dadka Soomaaliyeed oo la socda dhibaatada ee leedahay cudurkan. Waxaan ogaaday iney jiraan Soomaali kale oo cudurkan ku dhacay.”

(Burco)

The older men need to be prosecuted and the young women need to be empowered. This is criminal and unacceptable.

Older men and young women drive South African HIV epidemic

Sex between young women and older men is no secret in South Africa. The name ‘blesser’ is commonly used to describe a man who may at first pay for a teenager’s bus fare to high school, then buy school supplies she cannot afford, and perhaps lunch at a decent café. Over time, the adolescent sleeps with her provider.

A genetic analysis now suggests how this social phenomenon plays into the cycle of HIV transmission in the country, which has the world’s largest HIV epidemic. By analysing the similarity of viral genetic sequences among nearly 1,600 people with HIV in one community in KwaZulu-Natal, the study shows that adolescent girls and women in their early 20s tend to pick up the virus from men aged around 30. When the women grow older, they go on to infect their own long-term partners, who in turn may pass the virus on through affairs with younger women.

“This is the engine driving high rates of HIV,” says epidemiologist Salim Abdool Karim, senior author of the unpublished study and director of the Centre for the AIDS Program of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA). He presents the work this week at the International AIDS Conference in Durban.

Karim’s study also shows the importance of making broader social changes, adds Michel Sidibé, executive director of the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS). In parts of South Africa, eight times as many teenage girls have HIV as do teenage boys, and in some communities in KwaZulu-Natal, a 15-year-old girl has an 80% risk of getting HIV in her lifetime.

“Something that underlies the study is how common it is for older men to have sex with young girls. Pills are useful, but how can we break this silence around the lack of enforcement of laws that protect young women? How can we invest in the capacity of people to claim their rights and reduce this kind of violence?”

9

Prince Harry visits Lesotho where he helped to set up the charity Sentebale ‘Touching Tiny Lives’ which provides healthcare and education to vulnerable children in Mokhotlong, Lesotho, southern Africa. The particular theme of his visit was to check on the progress of the Mamohato children’s centre which will provide vital support to children affected by HIV

Harry photographed parts of his visit himself: ‘I have always enjoyed photography and the challenges that come with trying to capture the perfect shot, although privately I don’t take many photos. The best photos I have are in my head, I have some very special memories, mostly from Africa. But on this visit, I had the time and opportunity to be on the other side of the camera and take some photos in the stunning country of Lesotho for my charity Sentebale’

Can He Live? The Charity Work of Shawn “JAY Z” Carter

Every few months the general public and media seem to debate Jay Z’s dedication to charity work. Personally Hov channels the great Jewish philosopher Maimonides, who constructed the “Eight Levels of Charity.” He believed the highest form of giving is anonymous-to-anonymous, which equates to a completely self-less offering. Hov in heavily invested in this idea and chooses to conduct his charity work privately and efficiently. But for those still wondering, here is a list of Shawn Carter’s charity work that has been made public:

Every year from 1997 to 2004 Jay-Z hosted the “Jay-Z Santa Claus Toy Drive,” where he travels back to the Marcy Projects on Christmas Day with his family to donate presents to the children living there. The Shawn Carter Scholarship Fund now assumes the role of handing out the gifts. Jay also provides for Thanksgiving turkey drives in his hometown borough of Bedford–Stuyvesant every year.

Jay-Z employs hundreds of people at his various companies, and he always endeavors to employ under-privileged young black women and men who are most in need of employment.

April 1999 - Jay-Z donated his proceeds from the Denver stop of the “Hard Knock Life Tour” to help the families of the victims of the Columbine tragedy: “We decided to donate the proceeds from this show as soon as we saw the date on the schedule. We’ve known first hand how pointless and senseless violence always is, and we wanted to show our support in a real way.”

July 2000 - Participated in a program teaching young consumers the reward of investing in the stock market. As part of the three-month program Jay donated $10,000 to his former high school, the George Westinghouse Career and Technical Education High School.

August 2000 – Hosted, commentated, and made a donation at a charity basketball game that benefited the Boys Harbor summer camp and T.H.A.N.K.U. (The Hillcrest Avenue Neighborhood Kids Union).

2001 – Jay-Z and Roc-A-Fella Records formed “Team Roc,” a charity organization affiliated with the New York Mission Society that created basketball leagues for at-risk youth.

September 2001 – As well as a $45,000 personal donation from Jay to each charity, Roc-A-Fella Records donated a portion of each “The Blueprint Lounge Tour” concert ticket sold to the American Red Cross, WQHT New York’s “Hip-Hop Has Heart Foundation” and the New York Fire Department, who were working to support survivors and the families of the victims of the 9/11 tragedy. There was also a specially designed Rocawear shirt sold during the tour and in-stores that benefited those organizations.

October 2001 - Performed at “The Concert for New York City,” a benefit concert for victims of the 9/11 tragedy. Hov also donated unique memorabilia that was later auctioned off to support the Robin Hood Foundation.

November 2001 –Hosted and performed at the “Jay-Z’s Thanksgiving Give Back Concerts” in New York. Proceeds went to the “Team Roc” organization.

March 2002 - Headlined and donated to the “Urban Aid 2″ benefit concert in support of Russell Simmons’ charity that raises funds awareness for HIV prevention initiatives.

December 2002 – Jay-Z surprised a group of youth who were a part of the New York Knicks reading program for inner-city kids. He joined them in class for the day and read to them.

2003 - Formed the Shawn Carter Scholarship Foundation with his mother Gloria Carter. They founded the charity on the belief that any motivated individual in need should have the opportunity to further his or her education. Since its formation the Foundation has donated over $10 million to more than 750 students who would have otherwise not been able to afford a college education.

2003 - Since the first branch opened in 2003, each The 40/40 Club has ensured that a percentage of profits is given to music and sport charities in deprived communities. The club also gives first option on jobs to unemployed young people.

April 2003 - Was honored by The Foundation for Ethnic Understanding for his work in improving Black–Jewish relations.

October 2003 - Jay’s partnership with the Heineken Music Initiative had the Dutch brewers donation portions of their Red Star Sounds Present Def Jamaica dancehall project to the Shawn Carter Scholarship Foundation.

November 2003 - All proceeds from his legendary “Fade to Black” concert went to various charities, including the Shawn Carter Scholarship Foundation and the Hip-Hop Summit Action Network. During the show he donated $25,000 to the mothers of Biggie and Tupac to be used for their charitable efforts.

May 2004 – Jay-Z hosted a charity luncheon for the Golden Gloves Foundation, and along with “Team Roc” he formed a scholarship program for underprivileged youth who have boxing potential.

July 2004 – Enlisted Beyoncé, Tyra Banks, Queen Latifah, Kanye West, and more to design a pair of Reebok “S. Carter II” shoes to be auctioned off. All proceeds went to the Shawn Carter Scholarship Foundation and Jay matched the donations.

September 2005 - He donated $1 million to the American Red Cross’ relief effort after the devastating Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans. Hov also put in personal calls to his famous friends to encourage them to donate, and appeared on the BET telethon for Hurricane Katrina to appeal to the general public.

2006 - Sent more than $2,500 worth of designer street wear to the Campaign for Adolescent and University Student Empowerment, a foundation that supports the low-income area of Spring Hill in DeLand, Orlando.

2006 - Funded and co-produced the documentary film Black Sorority Project: The Exodus. The film told the story of 22 female students at Howard University who defied barriers of race and gender to join the women’s suffrage movement and form a new sorority, Delta Sigma Theta, which is still known as one of the nation’s most formidable women’s organizations.

August 2006 - Met with United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan at the organization’s headquarters in New York. He joined forces with the United Nations and together they planned to help fight the global water crisis. He set out on his “Water for Life Tour,” travelling all over the world filming the documentary “Diary of Jay-Z: Water for Life.” He installed pumps and water sewage solutions in impoverished villages all over Africa.

August 2006 – Jay-Z personally-pledged $400,000 to PlayPump International for the installation of water pumps in malnourished villages in Africa.

November 2006 – Performed a concert in New York city for his “Water for Life” program with the UN. The concert raised almost $300,000 for PlayPump International.

November 2006 - Appeared alongside Russell Simmons in a public service announcement for the Foundation for Ethnic Understanding, condemning anti-semitism and all other forms of racism.

November 2006 – Hosted and played in a charity poker game. $403,862 in proceeds went to the Shawn Carter Scholarship Foundation and AROD Family Foundation.

May 2008 - Established an educational trust for the two children of Sean Bell, the unarmed man shot and killed by the police in November 2006 on the day he was to be married. Jay-Z also made sure Bell’s fiancée, Nicole Paultre Bell, was taken care of, and hired her to appear in Rocawear’s ‘I Will Not Lose’ advertising campaign.

June 2008 - Designed a pair of wellington Hunter Boots during his time at the “Glastonbury Music Festival” to be sold at auction. Proceeds from the auction went to WaterAid to raise much need funds for their work in Madagascar improving access to safe water, hygiene and sanitation

June 2008 – Donated to the Robin Hood Foundation’s annual fundraising drive. The foundation’s proceeds support 240 poverty-fighting programs in New York City.

August 2008 - Performed at the “Africa Rising Music Festival” to raised money for Africa Rising, an organization established in 2006 to reflect the culture and positive attributes of Africa’s social, political, and economic progress.

December 2008 - Designed an “I/denti/tee” shirt in collaboration with Bono for Bono’s charity EDUN LIVE, which works to improve the skills of their clothing workers and aims to foster trade in Africa by ensuring all of its products are 100% African, from “grower to sewer.”

February 2009 – Formed the charity Two Kings with LeBron James. They donated over 150 musical instruments to the Mesa Arts Academy in Mesa, Arizona.

April 2009 - Jay-Z donated $25,000 to the Mary J. Blige and Steve Stoute Foundation for the Advancement of Women Now.

September 2009 – Organized the benefit concert “Answer the Call,” which benefited the New York Police & Fire Widows’ and Children’s Benefit Fund. The concert raised $750,000.

January 2010 – Recorded “Stranded (Haiti Mon Amour)” with Bono, Rihanna, and The Edge. They performed the song during the Hope foe Haiti Now live charity telethon. Proceeds from the sale of the song supported rebuilding in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake.

February 2010 – Donated a signed Gibson guitar to a charity auction for the Artists for Peace and Justice Foundation.

February 2010 – Jay-Z and LeBron James’ Two Kings charity conducted a counseling and inspiration session for the Boys & Girls Club of Greater Dallas in Texas.

September 2010 - Performed at the Keep a Child Alive organization’s “Black Ball” to raise awareness and urgently needed funds to help children and families affected by HIV in Africa and India.

May 2010 – Donated and signed his 35-piece limited edition Audemars Piguet “Royal Oak Offshore Las Vegas Strip Tourbillon” timepiece to the watchmakers “Time to Give” charity auction. The auction benefited the Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS organization, and Hov’s AP piece sold for $220,000. The event raised a total of $816,000 in proceeds.

August 2010 – Partnered with Nike to create five pairs of exclusive “All Black Everything” Air Force Ones, which were auctioned off to benefit the Shawn Carter Scholarship Foundation.

November 2010 – Donated and signed bottles of Armand de Brignac to be auctioned to benefit The Compound Foundation, which provides funds and equipment to build recording studios inside local group home centers.

New Years Eve 2010 – Auctioned VIP tickets to his and Coldplay’s headlining show at The Cosmopolitan Hotel in Las Vegas to benefit The Grammy Foundation.

February 2011 – Jay Z and LeBron James’ charity Two Kings provided funds to renovate over 100 public parks and gyms across America. 

March 2011 – Raised $42,000 for the Stephen Gaynor School, a non-profit school for students with learning differences, by auctioning the chance to sit courtside with him at two New Jersey Nets vs. New York Knicks games.

June 2011 – Donated to auction a coveted internship at Roc Nation, with proceeds benefiting the Mary J. Blige and Steve Stoute Foundation for the Advancement of Women Now.

September 2011 - Hosted a carnival-themed fundraiser at Pier 54 in New York for the Shawn Carter Scholarship Foundation. The event raised over $1 million in proceeds.

October 2011 - Lent his voice talents to the premiere episode of Warren Buffet’s animated children’s series Secret Millionaires Club. The show empowers kids by helping them understand the world they live in, teaching them about the impact their decisions have on their own lives and encouraging them to have the confidence to be the best they can be.

January 2012 – Jay Z and Beyoncé donated a large portion of the gifts given to them upon the birth of Blue Ivy Carter to charities that could pass them on to those less fortunate.

February 2012 - Jay performed two charity concerts at Carnegie Hall to benefit the United Way of New York City organization and the Shawn Carter Scholarship Foundation.

February 2012 – Jay donated $25,000 to the Whitney Houston Memorial Foundation in the wake of her untimely death.

March 2012 - Donated the Maybach 57 used in his and Kanye West’s “Otis” video to auction, where proceeds went to Save the Children’s relief efforts for the East Africa Drought Disaster of 2011.

September 2012 – Executive-produced and funded the release of Shola Lynch’s independent documentary Free Angela & All Political Prisoners.

October 2012 - Jay auctioned ten limited-edition signed Brooklyn Nets “Carter #4″ jerseys on eBay. Over $15,000 worth of proceeds went to the Shawn Carter Scholarship Foundation.

September 2012 – Proceeds from Jay’s “Made in America” festival went to the United Way of Greater Philadelphia and Southern New Jersey organization.

November 2012 – Donated to the Hurricane Sandy relief effort. He also purchased and donated generators to New York residents after they lost power during the hurricane.

July 2013 - Donated a large sum of money to the Marina Abramović Institute. In 2015 she would publicly accuse him of not making the donation to her art foundation, but later had to apologize as records show he had indeed donated.

September 2013 – Donated to the Made in Africa Foundation and helped launch the Africa50 campaign, which aims to lift 200 million Africans out of poverty.

October 2013 – Jay releases a holiday collection with New York department store Barneys. After racial profiling issues arose within the store Jay ensured that 100% of the profits would be donated to his Shawn Carter Scholarship Foundation. Proceeds topped $1 million.

2014 - Donated to and supported charities who demand and fight for justice for those discriminated against in the trans-community.

January 2014 - Performed at the invitation-only “DirecTV Superbowl Super Saturday” event, with proceeds benefiting the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation.

June 2014 – Jay Z and Beyoncé’s “On The Run Tour” donated $1 from every ticket purchased to the Shawn Carter Scholarship Foundation. A portion of the proceeds from each “Chase Lounge VIP Ticket Package” was also donated to the Shawn Carter Scholarship Foundation.

August 2014 – Donated tens of thousands of dollars to pay the bail charges for hundreds of protesters who were arrested during the Ferguson protests held after a police officer killed Michael Brown.

August 2014 – Curated the line-up and performers for the Roc Nation “Summer Classic Charity Basketball Tournament” charity basketball game. The $1,040,000 in proceeds benefited the RC22 Foundation and the PitCCh-In Foundation.

September 2014 – Jay performed as the headliner for the Global Citizen Festival and made a substantial donation to the cause. The Global Citizen project aims to end extreme global poverty, as well as focusing on solving epidemics like Ebola, ending the HIV/AIDS crisis, and providing clean water.

December 2014 – Jay-Z paid for and hand-delivered “I CAN’T BREATHE” shirts to the Brooklyn Nets locker room to promote the ‘Black Lives Matter’ movement on a national scale.

December 2014 - Met with the Governor of New York State Andrew Cuomo about doing a top to bottom review of the Criminal Justice system. Jay pushed them to discuss how everyone can work together to pass a reform package that ensures equality in the eyes of the law.

December/January 2015 - Jay and Beyoncé paid for over 2,000 American troops stationed in Kuwait and Afghanistan to have the opportunity to watch their “On the Run Tour” film on New Year’s Eve. They filmed spots for the beginning of the screenings, speaking of their gratitude for our nation’s troops and military families.

April 2015 - Donated tens of thousands of dollars to pay the bail charges for hundreds of protesters who were arrested during the Baltimore protests after the death of Freddie Gray.

May 2015 – Donated to the Baltimore Justice Fund. TiDAL live-streamed Prince’s “Rally 4 Peace” concert, and the streaming service matched the donations made by the general public during the stream.

May 2015 - Visited Baltimore on Mother’s Day to attend Prince’s “Rally 4 Peace” concert, and backstage he met with Freddie Gray’s family in a visit closed to the press. Hov and Beyoncé donated a large sum of money to the family to help them continue their journey for justice.

May 2015 – Jay’s longtime friend and collaborator dream hampton reveals that he has donated hundreds of thousands of dollars to the “Black Lives Matter” campaign, helping to establish new chapters of the movement all over the country.

June 2015 - Supported Roc Nation Sports athlete Robinson Cano at his annual charity event “Canoche” in Seattle. Hov donated a signed bottle of Armand de Brignac, which sold at auction for $5,500. He also made a private contribution to Cano’s charity fund.

August 2015 - Jay Z signed and wrote lyrics on two used skateboards, donated by professional riders Paul Rodriguez and Shane O’Neil, for the Tony Hawk Foundation’s “Boards + Bands” fundraising initiative.

September 2015 - As with every “Made in America” festival, Hov provides space free of charge to charity organizations in an area called the “Cause Village.”

October 2015 - Organised the TiDAL X: 10/20 charity concert. Enlisted his talented friends to donate their time and efforts and held a concert where 100% of the proceeds were matched by TiDAL and donated to charity. The event raised $1,500,000, which was donated to the New World Foundation and Harry Belafonte’s Sankofa non-profit group. They in turn gave the proceeds to organizations dealing with income and racial inequality, childhood education, and strengthening relationships between local communities and law enforcement.

November 2015 - Donated $100,000 to Los Angeles’ White Memorial Medical Center’s cancer unit.

February 2016 - Attended the annual “amfAR Gala,” one of the most successful and high-profile AIDS benefit events. Entrance started at $5,000 per person, and went up to $80,000 for a table.

March/April 2016 - Aligned the Shawn Carter Scholarship Foundation with Ticketmaster, with a percentage of each ticket sold by the company during a five-week period going directly to underprivileged scholarship students. “By removing financial obstacles to higher education, a student can move from public housing to public office, from bus pass to passport, and from unemployment to undeniable.”

June 2016 - Roc Nation partnered with Brooklyn-founded STATE Bags to donate over 30,000 fully-stocked backpacks to communities involved with President Obama’s “My Brother’s Keeper” initiative. The bags reached children across thirty cities nationwide, with six cities receiving a mentor programme from a Roc Nation artist or athlete. Nearly 20% of school age children in the United States are living in poverty, with 6.5 million students missing a month or more of school each year.

July 2016 - Curated the line-up and performers for the second Roc Nation “Summer Classic Charity Basketball Tournament” in Brooklyn. All the proceeds from the event went to four different benefits including the PitCCh In Foundation, the RC22 Foundation, Fundacion El Angel de Miguel Cotto and Beyond Type 1.

September 2016 - Jay Z lent his writing talents and voice to the Molly Crabapple-drawn “The War on Drugs is an Epic Fail” short film. His friend dream hampton had approached the Drug Policy Alliance about collaborating with Revolve Impact, the social impact agency she works with. Hov soon came on board with the project to encourage everyone to stand on the right side of history.

November 2016 - Jay Z headlines the inaugural Global Citizen India festival in Mumbai, India. He made a substantial donation to the cause, as well as his time. The Global Citizen project aims to end extreme global poverty, as well as focusing on solving epidemics like Ebola, ending the HIV/AIDS crisis, and providing clean water to all.

March 2017 saw the premiere of the prison reform documentary series TIME: The Kalief Browder Story, of which Jay served as an executive producer. He participated in a discussion at the Sundance Film Festival and a town hall event in New York. Upcoming productions Hov has in the pipeline include a series on the lives of Emmett Till and Trayvon Martin, as well as an inequality-focused series with National Geographic channel titled RACE.

May 2017 - Jay’s Shawn Carter Scholarship Foundation partnered with eBay on a ten-day charity auction, where the belongings of celebrities and unique Roc Nation and TIDAL experiences were auctioned off. 100% of the proceeds went to the foundation’s educational programs and scholarship fund.

June 2017 - Jay Z wrote an op-ed for TIME magazine on the injustices facing people of color who are trapped within the corrupt bail system. In the piece he revealed he made donations to the Southerners on New Ground and Color of Change organizations to ensure 100 fathers would be bailed out for Father’s Day.