history-of-magic

10

“By astutely acknowledging Gaynor’s emotive template but finding her own way to fill it, Negga speaks to the mind and the heart, showing us that an actor’s face is not insignificant but integral to the art of screen acting, as well as the emotional response of an audience. She reminds us that, even after a century of technological advancement, there is no more spellbinding special effect to be found in all of cinema than the human face.”

Ruth Negga’s Artful Restraint is the Real Triumph of Loving by Matthew Eng

(Source: tribecafilm.com)

👽 hp themed blog aesthetics + blog compliments 👽

hey hey guys i have off of school for the next six days and i’m already bored (lmao) so i’ve decided to do some hp themed blog aesthetics + blog compliments!!

rules: 

  • must be following ginny weasley’s gf (aka me)
  • reblog this post please!!
  • send me an ask with this emoji 👽 and a some sort of song, book, tv show, or movie recommendation for me to check out over my break!!
  • don’t let this flop or i’ll be sad ): 
  • blacklist ‘faith rates’ if you don’t wanna see these!!

aesthetics format under the cut

Keep reading

6

Marley Dias, the 12-year-old behind #1000BlackGirlBooks, is writing her own book!

  • In February 2016, Marley Dias, who was 11 at the time, launched the #1000BlackGirlBooks project, collecting books featuring black girls as the main character. 
  • Now, after collecting over 8,000 such books, Dias has decided to author a #BlackGirlBook of her own.
  • On Thursday, Scholastic announced that 12-year-old Dias had signed a deal with the publisher for a book due in Spring 2018. 
  • According to a press release, the book is a “keep-it-real guide” to helping kids and preteens make their dreams come true.
  • “Through her smarts and ingenuity, she’s delivered a jolt of inspiration that’s sent an unstoppable shock-wave to kids everywhere who’ve stood up with Marley to shout ‘Yes!’ to the power of positive action,” Scholastic’s vice president and executive editor Andrea Pinkney said.
  • “In this book, Marley will share her dynamic wisdom with readers everywhere.” Read more

follow @the-movemnt

7

Google doodle honors Bessie Coleman, the first black woman in the United States to earn a pilot’s license

  • When Bessie Coleman took flight in 1921 she didn’t just break the glass ceiling — she soared tens of thousands of feet above it.
  • At the time, Coleman was the first black woman in the United States to earn a pilot’s license. 
  • And as she ascended into the sky that day, all of the people who doubted her, who discriminated against her for her race and gender, would become smaller and smaller until they disappeared out of sight.
  • “The air is the only place free from prejudices,” Coleman once said.
  • On Thursday, Google commemorated Coleman’s 125th birthday with a doodle showing her plane doing loops and turns to spell the search engine’s name. Read more 

follow @the-movemnt

Britain’s Biggest Secret - The Black Victorians

Pictured above is the Higdon family. This photograph was taken in the year 1898 in Britain. That is all we know about them.

Who were the Black Victorians? Mainstream history has virtually erased them from our minds and history books. We have been filled with images of slavery in America and across the world, but why is it that this chapter in black history was skipped? Why isn’t it equally common knowledge that in the midst of all of that darkness there was light, also.

Never before seen photos were uncovered, giving us over 200 images of glances into our past. Many of the photos did not include names or any details whatsoever, cloaking these people in mystery for all of time.

At one point in history, people of color were included in high society and walked the cobbled streets of Britain. The women wore intricate, voluminous gowns and wore their hair in curls and chignons. The men in suits and fair business. This may not have been the case for all black people in Britain, but for some it was. 

The Victorian Era was ruled under Queen Victoria, an era that is described as an opulent culture, although there were underlying bouts of poverty and child labor. History would like you to believe that black people didn’t arrive in Britain until 1948 during “The Empire Windrush”, when many Jamaican descendants entered the country, but that is not so. There has been proof to suggest otherwise. There is documentation that proves that it wasn’t uncommon to see black faces at a Shakespeare show. We’ve been there all along, humming softly in the background.

These images prove that you can’t take mainstream history at face value. Take the time to look behind the curtain and uncover OUR history. It’s as if our ancestors are just waiting for us to seek them out.

Who were the Black Victorians?

To see more of these images check out this video reel. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=08mwrYUzPqI

Happy Black History Month.

These girls dressed in Hidden Figures costumes make us really excited for the incredible things Black girls will continue to accomplish

Ambrielle Baker-Rogers, Miah Bell-Olson, and Morgan Coleman are just elementary schoolers, but they’re already inspirational at a professional level. The three students dressed up for a project commemorating Black History Month. (Read More)