history that is beautiful

3

“I HATE MY LIPS”

After I took this boy’s picture, I was told by his mom how self conscious he is about his vitiligo that’s developed over the past year. She told me that he hates his lips. He avoids looking at himself in the mirror and can hardly smile in pictures because he can’t bear the thought of his “ugly” lips being preserved in photographs. Can y'all do me a favor and like or reblog this? I wanna show him this post so he can see how poppin he actually is. I want him to realize that his skin is flawless and that his vitiligo is just an additional mark of distinction to the already unique beauty that is Blackness, in all of its various shades.

in this era that we’re in, self-love is crucial and we can’t afford to have our black children facing the world with anything less than overwhelming love and pride in their skin. Instagram.com/themightydexter
4

Happy Blackout Day! My name is Sophia and I’m a scifi writer! I have two books on amazon. One is a scifi mystery about a black girl named Cosmo. My second book is a short romance story about black love in space!

Also sometimes I tweet things.

Black Women Are

Pioneers: Harriet Tubman

Originally posted by nyuniversity

Educated: 

Dr. Hadiya Nicole Green AKA  The Pioneer in the fight against cancer



Michelle Obama

Originally posted by theproblackgirl

Beautiful: Jackie Aina (She’s also artistic, intelligent, funny)

Originally posted by fuckyeahfemaleyoutubers

Uzo Aduba

Originally posted by theproblackgirl

Soulful: Chargaux 

Originally posted by thechronicleofshe

Nina Simone

Originally posted by rollingstone


Phenomenal:  Oprah  

Originally posted by larry-ride-or-die

Beyonce

Originally posted by aninounettear


Hilarious:  Leslie Jones 

Originally posted by teachingfeelslike

Gabourey Sidible

Originally posted by dailyahsgifs


Poetic: Maya Angelou

Lauryn Hill

Originally posted by hip-hop-fanatic

Confident: 

Marsai Martin

Originally posted by wildjay101

Solange Knowles 

Originally posted by amarachixxxiv

Yara Shahidi 

Originally posted by thepowerofblackwomen


Fearless: Assata Shakur & Angela Davis

Originally posted by ch-r-o-m-e

Originally posted by thesecrowns

Unwavering:   Lezley McSpadden, Gwen Carr, Wanda Johnson,  and Sybrina Fulton aka Mothers of The Movement

Fighters:  Alicia Garza, Patrisse Cullors, and Opal Tometi aka founders of #BlackLivesMatter

Visionaries: Ava Duvernay (Director)

Shonda Rhimes (producer, screenwriter)

Determined: Ilhan Omar (Politician)

Originally posted by refinery29

Olympians:

Gabby Douglas

Originally posted by i-dont-understand-gymnastics

Simone Biles

Originally posted by sports-and-everything-else

Serena and Venus (and someone asking them a dumb question)

Originally posted by youreunattractiveinside

Allyson Fellix

Originally posted by bashfulhound

Ibtihaj Muhammad

Originally posted by womens-sports

Some Bonus Awesomeness:

Amber Riley

Originally posted by chichichichias

Kerry Washington, Taraji P Henson, and Mary J Blige 

Originally posted by alyandmatt

Janelle Monae 

Originally posted by tragedyb0ner

Despite being one of the most disrespected demographics, black women remain to be an integral part of America’s (and also global) history, present, and future. Validate, and humanize them. And take note of all the badassery and awesomeness. 


Originally posted by theblvckcool



10

Temple  of Athena Nike

Athens’ Acropolis, Greece

420 BCE

Stylobate: 8.27 m x 5.64 m; height: ca. 4 m.

The Temple of Athena Nike was named after the Greek goddess, Athena Nike. The temple is the earliest fully Ionic temple on the Acropolis. It was a prominent position on a steep bastion at the south west corner of the Acropolis to the right of the entrance, the Propylaea. In contrast to the Acropolis proper, a walled sanctuary entered through the Propylaea, the Victory Sanctuary was open, entered from the Propylaea’s southwest wing and from a narrow stair on the north. The sheer walls of its bastion were protected on the north, west, and south by the Nike Parapet, named for its frieze of Nikai celebrating victory and sacrificing to their patroness, Athena Nike.

Nike means victory in Greek, and Athena was worshipped in this form, as goddess of victory in war and wisdom. The citizens worshipped the goddess in hope of a successful outcome in the long Peloponnesian War fought on land and sea against the Spartans and their allies.