history of periods

Standing statuette (bronze with gold inlay) of the ancient Egyptian cat-goddess Bastet, holding an usekh-collar topped by a feline head and sun-disk.  Artist unknown; ca. 400-250 BCE (Late Period or early Ptolemaic).  Now in the Walters Art Museum, Baltimore.  Photo credit: Walters Art Museum.

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top 10 favorite events or periods in history (in no particular order)

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Do you love period dramas? Do you want to support gay-centered media?

The Burying Party, written and directed by Richard Weston, is a film that follows the last year in the life of Wilfred Owen, a gay man whose poetry about World War I changed the landscape of war poetry and landed Owen a much deserved standing as one of the most renowned poets in all of English history.

As of right now, the film is only halfway to completion. Weston and co. are relying on crowd funding in order to get the film done, and they need to raise £5,000 ($6,585) total in order to ensure that the film is finished in time to be released on the 100th anniversary of Wilfred Owen’s death in November of next year. The campaign closes on Nov. 27, 2017. That’s where you come in.

Here is a link to their KICKSTARTER CAMPAIGN, where you can read more about the project, as well as watch the trailer.

Please share the word about this project and consider supporting it if you can! Wilfred Owen was an amazing historical figure, and there isn’t nearly enough media out there actively honoring not just his poetic accomplishments but also his sexual orientation!

In France we say “les anglais ont débarqué” which means “The English have landed” to talk about having our periods. This is really funny because it goes back to the time Napoleon lost in Waterloo in 1815 against the English and then they went to France to occupy. The english soldiers had red uniforms and the people hated so much the english that they used them to talk about periods. The feud France/England is so funny, everyone is so bitter 

10th February 1840 - Queen Victoria's Wedding Dress

As many people know, it is said that Victoria started the trend of wearing a white coloured dress on your wedding day. However, not many know  how complicated the journey was that had it come to be.

In the early of planning her wedding, Lord Melbourne suggested that she might wear her royal robes of state, as she mentions in her diary -


They talked about me wearing my robes, but I thought not.


She made it clear that her wedding was not like others of the time, where it was all for advancement and gain, with no thought of romantic preference. Her wedding was a personal affair; she was marrying for love.

In the end, Victoria would design her own dress, as well as her bridesmaids’ dresses. She had her dress made entirely of British materials, as was well publicised at the time. This was a political move, as she was showing to foreign powers just what her country had to offer and that she was still representing Britain.  The silk was woven in Spitalfields, East London and the lace was handmade in Devon.  Finally, the outfit was sewed together by Victoria’s own dressmaker, a Mrs Bettans, with the pattern being destroyed afterwards to prevent the dress being replicated.

The finished garment would include a bodice, the waist pointed over a full, pleated skirt with full puffed sleeves and a round neck, all made of Spitalfields white silk satin. The train was immense, measuring 18 feet and edged with orange blossom spays (orange blossom being a symbol of fertility). Orange blossom would feature a lot on her person, as her wreath above her veil (which was 12 feet long) was made of it and it trimmed her dress.  She also wore matching satin shoes (see two above), and a blue sapphire brooch at her breast which was a wedding gift from Albert. In her diary, on her wedding day of the tenth of February 1840, she described her whole outfit as thus -


I wore a white satin dress, with a deep flounce of Honiton lace, an imitation of an old design. My jewels were my Turkish diamond necklace & earrings & dear Albert’s beautiful sapphire brooch


Victoria did not wear her actual wedding dress for the whole day, as when she returned to Buckingham Palace after the service and wedding breakfast she withdrew to change into ‘a white silk gown trimmed with swansdown and a white bonnet with orange flowers’, an outfit very similar to her original ensemble.
Years later, Victoria would allow her favourite daughter Beatrice (who would be one of the queens few close companions in her widowhood) to wear her wedding veil at her own wedding in 1885 (see photograph below). She would be the only daughter of Victoria allowed this special privilege. In addition later still, Victoria would be buried wearing her lace veil, in 1901

Featured Image Emily Blunt as Victoria on her wedding day, The Young Victoria 2009
Sources -
Becoming Queen, Kate Williams
Historic Royal Places
Photograph #3 by Daily Mail

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Medicine chest by KotomiCreations