history of doctor who

The Problem With Cringe Culture

From what I’ve seen, the phenomenon dubbed Cringe Culture is a paragon of insecurity, internalized misogyny, and self-loathing.

Let me elaborate a little here:  here on Tumblr (and in life in general, honestly), a lot of folks are very pre-occupied with what is or isn’t Cringey.  It’s a dynamic somewhat reminiscent of an eighth grade schoolyard, but that’s really not the issue here.  

What Tumblr folks dub Cringey are typically things that are enjoyed by young teens (in particular, young girls) exploring fandom and fan creativity for the first time.

Yes, these teens are frequently obnoxious, overzealous, and loud, but it’s an exciting time for kids:  we as adults may have comfortably settled into our interests, but for them it’s an avenue of unsupervised self-expression they may not have experienced before.  Moreover, they have little to no experience in moderating themselves, which is one of the reasons why I believe the act of mocking them to be a somewhat callous one.  

Are they occasionally annoying?  Subjectively, yes.  I frequently find young teens and tweens annoying, particularly when they’re being loud and obnoxious during my allotted writing time.  But I don’t shame them for it, on here or in real life, because I’m an adult and they are literally children .  

And most importantly, so are the people mocking them.

I’ll elaborate once again:  I’m nineteen.  Most of my friends, both on here and on my other blog, are fellow chill late teens and twenty-somethings.  And I’ve never seen any adult who’s secure in their own self-image do anything other than Do Their Own Thing and allow everyone else do the same.

In other words, I’ve been involved in fandom for a few years now, and almost everyone I’ve seen actively participating in cringe culture has turned out to be no older than seventeen or so themselves, and probably (consciously or otherwise) attempting to distance themselves from their “embarrassing” younger alter egos and feel more confident in their purported maturity. 

Because they probably did some Cringey things when they were fourteen, too:  maybe they drew manga OCs on DeviantArt with needlessly elaborate hair, ran a passionate SuperWhoLock blog, read Homestuck, wrote angsty poetry about turning into wolves, et cetera.  

Of course, the whole point here is that there is literally nothing wrong with any of these things:  they’re harmless examples of children exploring revenues of creativity for the first time, that we’ve been conditioned to find embarrassing.  

Now, I’m not going to pretend I didn’t have this phase myself:  I once got into an impassioned argument on Facebook with a bunch of One Direction fans when I was sixteen or so, in which I dismissed their obsession as being Stupid and Juvenile and proclaimed my favored Heavy Metal as being far superior.  

Now, I’m still not into One Direction in the slightest, but if I could go back in time I would probably smack my sixteen-year-old self upside the head and tell her to leave people alone and let them do their own thing.

Of course, a large part of my reasoning was also driven at the time by my unfortunate Not Like Other Girls phase, in which I wanted to distance myself from the silliness of my fellow teen girls as much as possible.  I may or may not have still been in my “I hate pink” phase, which I still shudder to think about to this day.

Which brings me to another one of Cringe Culture’s more problematic aspects:  it’s inherently a little misogynist, in that almost everyone who partakes in it is attempting to distance themselves from the interests of teenage girls.

Shows like Doctor Who, Steven Universe, Voltron, Supernatural, Yuri on Ice, and many others all have passionate and predominantly young female fanbases, and as such, people seem unwittingly inclined to see them as inherently vapid, annoying, or Cringey in a way that equally vocal male-dominated fandoms simply aren’t.  

Even being a Trekkie (Star Trek fan) was considered embarrassing when the fandom was predominantly female populated, although the means by which fanfiction and discourse was exchanged was via fan-run zines rather than Tumblr blogs.  Now that men are in on it, it’s considered one of the best fandoms there is.

More male populated fandoms such as Game of Thrones, the Walking Dead, the DC and Marvel cinematic universes, and Star Wars are just as impassioned, and have had just as many ideological issues in the past.  Yet are these things ever denigrated as being Cringy or annoying?  Not that I can recall.

Another one of my greatest issues with Cringe Culture is that it discourages passion:  I have never encountered a fandom, Cringey or otherwise, that hasn’t produced genuinely stunning works of art and fiction.  Moreover, I’ve never encountered a fandom that doesn’t have fans who have cited it as what saved them from depression or even suicide.  

So if someone’s passionate about something, even if it’s something of no value to you, it costs absolutely zero dollars to mind your own goddamn business and not taint their joy with your own insecurity, cynicism, and internalized self-loathing.  

Similarly, I can speak from experience when I say my interests and fandoms got me through the very worst period of my adolescence, and I’d be a significantly less happy person if I didn’t have still have them to fall back on.  Not everyone’s sole source of enjoyment and comfort in life comes from nihilistic memes.

So if you want to take a step towards fostering a more creative generation, take a step away from Cringe Culture.  Respect other people’s interests, and openly and unabashedly enjoy your own.  Question why you think certain interests are Cringey, and try to distance yourself from the mentality that you’re a better or cooler person for being less similar to young women.

And finally, try and forgive your fourteen-year-old self for whatever cringiness they may have been culpable of, and tell them that you love them anyway.

8
the doctors as 'history of the entire world, i guess' quotes
  • (thanks to @fluffyhales for the help!)
  • 1: don't worry about rome, it won't fall.
  • 2: look out china, there's a new china in china.
  • 3: well i guess we're stuck here now.
  • 4: by the way, where the hell are we?
  • 5: now everyone will want to be my friend and live near me.
  • 6: that's bullshit. this whole thing is bullshit. that's a scam. fuck the church. here's 95 reasons why.
  • 7: SIKE ~they both get angrieeerrr~
  • 8: some stars burn out and die. bigger stars burn out and die with PASSION.
  • War: there's the korean war, korea vs korea. nobody wins, then it's on pause forever.
  • 9: oh fuck, now everything's dead.
  • 10: it's sad. i'm sad. i miss you.
  • Metacrisis!10: ~that's a human person~
  • 11: you could make a reli- no don't.
  • 12: now you can buy your way out of hell!
  • BONUS:
  • Cushing!Doctor: i wanna invent time and space.
MEDICAL BOOKS

If you’re looking for some medical (non-textbook) books to read in your limited amount of spare time, check out some of my favorites below:

The House of God by Samuel Shem

A classic pre-medical school book. It details residency life in the 1970s. You can talk about this book with almost any medical student or attending. It is practically a medical school requirement. 

Intern: A Doctor’s Initiation by Sandeep Jauhar

A more modern look into medicine residency intern year from the perspective of Cardiologist Dr. Sandeep Jauhar. Comes with the highs and lows you can expect. After having been through 6 months of residency, I would say it is very accurate.

Gifted Hands: The Ben Carson Story by Ben Carson. Just because I find Ben Carson incompetent as a politician does not mean I do not respect him as a doctor. He is a phenomenal pediatric neurosurgeon and this book details his story.

On Doctoring: Stories, Poems, Essays by Richard Reynolds

A book of stories and poems from doctors throughout time and also from famous poets and authors depicting their views of medicine.

Private Practice: In the Early Twentieth-Century Medical Office of Dr. Richard Cabot by Christopher Crenner

An interesting look into a Boston medicine clinic from the early 1900′s. With excerpts from old patient notes which I found very interesting. 

And if you have an interest is something more dark:

Blind Eye by James B. Stewart

The real story of a doctor murderer from the 1990′s who killed multiple patients without getting caught for several years.

Devil in the White City by Erik Larson 

The story of the World’s Fair in Chicago in the late 1800′s. A great look into the history of Chicago and the murderous doctor who roamed its streets.

And lastly:

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams. Just a great book in general. My favorite.

Suggested by other users:

The Making of a Woman Surgeon by Dr. Elizabeth Morgan

Suggested by http://thetay-in-the-757.tumblr.com

This book is my all time favorite, as I am a female aspiring to work in the healthcare system myself. Dr. Morgan chronicles her own journey in the male-dominated arena of medicine in the 1970s and 1980s, as she struggles to maintain an appropriate balance between remaining empathetic towards her patients and yet must toe the line of not becoming too emotionally involved with her patients so that she burns out, as well as maintaining her own femininity in a man’s world.

When Breath Become Air by Dr. Paul Kalanithi

Suggested by http://nandemokandemo.tumblr.com

When Breath Becomes Air is an autobiography written by an esteemed neurosurgeon who discovers he has Stage IV lung cancer in his final stages of residency. It appeals to not only medical students, with his profound impressions of cadaver dissection and his first life and deaths, but also to current medical professionals by questioning philosophical domains of mortality and what a meaningful life is, as well as to non-medical professionals with moving thoughts on family, life, death and meaning. It is not a novel to be missed by any person.

Forget about Weeping angels and the Silence, this episode was the scariest shit in the history of Doctor Who. Those people getting turned into cybermen, still themselves inside, constantly in pain, knowing what an abomination they became. That shit felt so realistic it gave me creeps.

The history of doctor who
  • 60s: wow this show is a nice short series, well done!
  • 70s: I can't believe this show has lasted this long, haha Tom baker is so funny.
  • 80s: this shows kinda getting old, it needs to end.
  • 90s: ...I think it's dead,?
  • 00s: OMG I remember this show, it was so good than, and it's even better now.
  • 10s: fuck off Steven Moffat.