history of communism

aloeplantt  asked:

hey quick q idk if it's been answered already but have aros & aces historically been a part of the lgbt community? like whats the history? idk im just seein all this ace discourse & idk where to stand. ty!

All right, my answer may be long because I think it is important to make sure we have a nuanced discussion around this. 

The answer to this question is not a clear one. There are instances where asexual and aromantic people have been excluded from the queer community, but there are also instances where they have been included. 

The problem with saying “Aces have always been a part of the queer community” or “Aces have never been a part of the queer community” is that you will be wrong either way. 

Asexual and aromantic people have historically had to face exclusion from the queer community, and they still do today. They have also historically been a part of the queer community (I will always point people to The Golden Orchid because I think it is one of the most clear examples of asexual and aromantic inclusion in the queer community). 

So to have this discussion in a clear and healthy way we need to first divorce ourselves of the idea that the queer community is some monolithic thing. 

We have always had division; and in every place and in every time period the queer community is different. Queer people haven’t generally been able to organize on a global scale, so there is no truth of the queer community that is true everywhere and in every time. 

The internet has given us an advantage in that we can have discussions internationally within the queer community, which has never happened before to the scale it is happening today. Which makes right now a turning point for the queer community. 

The decisions we make today will be recorded in the history books of tomorrow. So it is time for us all to decide what kind of community we want to be. 

Throughout history we have examples of when our community has been exclusive and catered only to a select few identities, and we have examples of the opposite happening. We have examples of people coming together to fight for the rights and the safety of not only people who share their exact struggle but for people who face a whole different set of obstacles. And it is time for us all to decide what type of people we want to be remembered as.

The very word queer is vague which many people now find issue with but I think is a distinct advantage. It does not narrow our community down to a series of labels we care about. 

And if I have learned anything from my ongoing study of queer history, it is that how society has treated different sexual and gender identities has changed throughout time. And to assume that will stop with us seems pretty arrogant.

There have been times when being gay has been accepted in certain societies. But because of these times does that mean that gay people don’t deserve a place in the queer community? Of course not.

I fully believe there have been times when asexual and/or aromantic people have been fully accepted in society at certain points. But now is not that time. So we include them. We fight for them because right now that is what is needed. 

I love the queer community. For all it’s many flaws I have faith in it. One of the reasons I love it is because of how inclusive we have the power to be. 

I cannot make this decision for anyone else. But as someone who studies queer history, I can say that while the past can give us much, it is ultimately the present and the future we must make our decisions for.

Fact: Bisexual women and lesbians used to give each other violets to symbolize their love in the early 20th century, referencing a poem by Sappho. Gay and bisexual men used to wear carnations, a trend started by Oscar Wilde. Gay and bisexual communities have always been intertwined, sharing in each other’s love and struggles and creating history together. 

I feel like it’s not a coincidence that when people are talking abt trans women at stonewall there is a tendency to frequently leave Miss Major out, because she’s the only one still alive and that gets in the way of people’s comfortable crystallized hagiography and people will always prefer a silent trans woman icon over a live, complex, speaking trans woman

5

The Orlando City Soccer Club’s new stadium includes a beautiful memorial honoring the victims of the massacre at Pulse. 49 seats are arranged together in a rainbow, each representing one of the victims.

“We put them in Section 12, obviously because we felt that was pertinent — it was June 12 last year when the tragedy happened,” said Phil Rawlins, the team’s founder, while standing before the purple, blue, green, yellow, orange and red rows. A stamp in the center of each seat reads #OrlandoUnited.

“So they’re right here in Section 12, they’re right down by the benches. They’ll certainly be seen by everybody inside the stadium, and a very significant reminder of that day,” he said.

The seats will be a permanent memorial at the stadium. Breathtaking. (via the Huffington Post)

Some Twitter Troll: (responding to @BisexualBatman) it’s not the gay communities responsibility to build bisexuals up. Biphobia is a myth.
Biscuit Magazine:  biphobia is spending 50 years telling bisexuals they should ID as gay in an act of solidarity, then saying there are no bis in the movement.


Imagine living in a city where there are no monuments, no buildings from before 1970, no proof that you had grandparents or parents, no history at all. Wouldn’t that make you feel like you were just a passing fad, that you could be blown away like leaves?… for any community to feel substantial and able to change without losing themselves, a history is absolutely crucial.
—  Emma Donoghue, talking about LGBT history and LGBT historical fiction
  • 1600s aristocrat: Can you point to one successful example of a capitalist republic in the history of time? You can't, and that's because democratic election of leaders goes against human nature. It might work on a small scale, but all notions of individual liberty are just idealistic pipe dreams. Any time it's been attempted on a large scale, capitalism has killed more people than feudalism ever could. We've already reached the end of history.
  • Radical peasant: *looks at the audience of the stage play like James from The Manor*
4

March 28th 1871: Paris Commune declared

On this day in 1871, following elections held two days prior, the Paris Commune was officially proclaimed. The Commune seized power in opposition to the election of a conservative National Assembly February 1871; republican Parisians feared that when they met in Versailles the royalist Assembly would restore the monarchy. When officials of Adolphe Thiers’s government tried to remove the city guard’s cannons as a precautionary measure on March 18th, the people rebelled. The city guard called municipal elections for March 26th, which saw victory for the revolutionaries, who established the Commune to govern the city of Paris. On March 28th, the new government held its first meeting and was formally declared. The Commune immediately set about enacting socialist policies, which included a ten-hour work day, abolition of the death penalty, end of military conscription, banning established religion and promoting female suffrage. They adopted a plain red flag as the flag of the Commune, and envisioned that the situation in Paris would encourage a nationwide revolution. The Commune’s lack of internal organisation left them vulnerable to attack, but the catalyst for retribution came when Communard soldiers killed two French troops. On May 21st, national forces entered Paris through an undefended area, launching a violent campaign of street fighting known as ‘Bloody Week’. Around 20,000 insurrectionists were killed before the Commune fell on May 28th. The government treated the surviving Communards and their supporters ruthlessly - arresting around 38,000 and deporting another 7,000. The Commune became a symbol of socialist revolution in Europe and further abroad, with their supporters lamenting the martyrdom of the Communards.

The thing is, capitalism has never been reformed ‘peacefully’.

Reform movements which have formally disavowed violent means - from the Civil Rights movement in 1960s America, to Attlee’s Labour government in 1940s Britain - have only been historically successful because mass, organised, revolutionary movements of the politically disenfranchised outside of the formal reform movement have forced those benefiting from the status quo to cede concessions to non-violent, often middle-class, reformist leaders. Malcolm X, the Socialist Party of the USA and the Communist Party forced the American elite to come to the table with Dr. King; the syndicalist and communist trade unions in post-War Britain made opposition to Attlee’s NHS and limited nationalisations foolhardy.

Those who preach non-violence as a strategy rather than as a flexible tactic fatally mistake capitalism for a rational, logical system which plays by its own rules and respects human life.

We know better.

2

18/10/16
Break is finally here and I’m in desperate need of it! After raisin weekend and my long nights on Catullus, I’m gonna need some time to get back into shape and work on my next essay (also: found this quite old edition with what looks like 40years old student notes in it and I’m in love)

I think people really underestimate how huge of an impact the Internet has had on the LGBTQIA+ community as we know it today. This is also why it saddens me that people make the excuse of “x community only formed in the late 90’s/early 2000’s” to exclude certain communities.

The Internet started bringing people together, introduced people living in more rural areas to the larger community, and allowed for more detailed discussions about gender and sexuality between strangers who may never have met each other otherwise. It’s no coincidence that so many new communities and identity labels began to spring up at around the same time. Always remember that community formation did not begin or end with Stonewall.