history not heritage

2

Just the other side of a sea wall lies the Church of St Ia, the parish church of St Ives, in Cornwall. St Ia was supposedly an Irish holy woman of the 5th or 6th Century. The church was built in the 1400s, during the reign of Henry V, as a chapel of ease in the parish of Lelant. The tower stands at over 80 feet high and is made of Zennor granite, which was brought to the site by sea.

Cornish Wanderer ©

Important daily reminder

Without Muslims, you wouldn’t have:

1. Coffee, which an Arab named Khalid invented

2. Clocks, by a man called al-Jazari from Diyarbakir in South-East Turkey in the 1200s

3. Cameras, Ibn al-Haitham revolutionized optics

4. Cleanliness (toothbrush, soap, perfumes, etc)

5. Universities, because of Fatima al-Fihri

6. Planes, because of Abbas ibn Firnas who was the first person to make a real attempt to construct a flying machine and actually fly

7. Surgical instruments, by a man from the 10th century named Abul Qasim Khalaf ibn al-Abbad al-Zahrawi, a man known in the West as Abulcasis

8. Maps

9. Music, al-Kindi, an artist long ago, created the system of writing down songs

10. Algebra, which was introduced by Al-Khwarizmi

11. Guitar, which was originally known as a “qitara” in the Arabic of Andalusia

12. Magnifying glasses/glasses, the scholar Alhazen (Abu al-Hasan) from Basra was the first person to describe how the eye works

13. Hospitals

14. Distillation, was invented around the year 800 by Islam’s foremost scientist, Jabir ibn Hayyan, who transformed alchemy into chemistry

15. Vacation, brought to Europe from Turkey

And the list goes on. I just picked some of the ones that are still used a lot

10

“Skellig Michael (Irish: Sceilig Mhichíl), or Great Skellig (Irish: Sceilig Mhór), is an island (the larger of the two Skellig Islands) in the Atlantic Ocean, 11.6 km west of the Iveragh Peninsula in County Kerry, Ireland. A Christian monastery was founded on the island at some point between the 6th and 8th century, and was continuously occupied until its abandonment in the late 12th century. The remains of the monastery, along with most of the island itself, became a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1996.

Skellig Michael was uninhabited prior to the foundation of its monastery. Folklore holds that Ir, son of Míl Espáine, was buried on the island, and a text from the 8th or 9th century states that Duagh, King of West Munster, fled to “Scellecc” after a feud with the Kings of Cashel, although it is not known whether these events actually took place.

The monastic site on the island is located on a terraced shelf 600 feet above sea-level, and developed between the sixth and eighth century. It contains six beehive cells, two oratories as well as a number of stone crosses and slabs. It also contains a later medieval church. The cells and oratories are all of dry-built corbel construction. A carefully designed system for collecting and purifying water in cisterns was developed. It has been estimated that no more than twelve monks and an abbot lived here at any one time. A hermitage is located on the south peak.”

10

Black Heritage Stamps with Ella Fitzgerald, Hattie McDaniel, Madam C.J. Walker, Harriet Tubman, Ida B. Wells, Bessie Coleman, Sojourner Truth, Anna Julia Cooper, Marian Anderson, Shirley Chisholm.

3

Hever Castle

Once home to Anne Boleyn, King Henry VIII’s unfortunate second wife, Hever Castle is a Tudor manor of exquisite beauty surrounded by some of Britain’s finest gardens. Try and stay dry in the unique water maze, walk among the flowers in the walled rose garden, then experience Tudor life in the rooms of the castle itself. You can even stay the night!

See more of Britain’s Castles

Jewish privilege is

going to visit the Jewish History museum in New York, and knowing you’re in the right place before you can check the signs because there are police permanently stationed outside

having to go through a metal detector before you can go in

knowing that every other Jew in the building is terrified that they could be murdered for who they are at any minute, even in the heart of the Upper East Side of Manhattan.

Jewish privilege is fearing for your life.

Thank you!

Great news! We have raised the funds to keep King Alfred’s Coins in the heart of the region in which it was discovered.

The Watlington hoard is the first large Viking hoard discovered in Oxfordshire & contains over 200 Anglo-Saxon coins.

We would like to thank everyone who donated to the campaign. Lead support was provided by the Heritage Lottery Fund, towards both the acquisition and to fund a range of educational and outreach activities. Thanks to a further major grant from Art Fund as well as contributions from the public and the Friends and Patrons of the Ashmolean, the Museum reached its fundraising target within days of the deadline.

“The Watlington Hoard is one of the most exciting and important acquisitions we have ever made, particularly significant because it was found in Oxfordshire. To be able to keep the hoard in the county and put it on display with the Ashmolean’s Anglo-Saxon collections, which include the world-famous Alfred Jewel, was an opportunity we could not miss.”
     
    – Dr Xa Sturgis, Director of the Ashmolean

An Exceptional Discovery

In October 2015, metal detectorist James Mather discovered an important Viking hoard near Watlington in South Oxfordshire. It dates from the end of the 870s, a key moment in the struggle between Anglo-Saxons and Vikings for control of southern England.

The Watlington Hoard sheds new light on the conflict between Anglo-Saxons and Vikings, and on the relationship between the two great Anglo-Saxon kingdoms of Mercia and Wessex.

The hoard contains over 200 Anglo-Saxon coins, including many examples of previously rare coins of Alfred the Great, King of Wessex (871–899) and his less well-known contemporary, King Ceolwulf II of Mercia (874–879). This is the first large Viking hoard discovered in Oxfordshire, which once lay on the border of Wessex and Mercia. The Watlington Hoard therefore has enormous relevance to our county. At the same time this is a find of truly national importance, providing a major new source of information about this tumultuous time in the history of our nation.

10

Magical Spain (via Pinterest).

Definitely, Spain is different

Mine is a country of contrasts, full of legends and history, with a cultural heritage of centuries, and I love it.

(Credits of the photographies in the description).