historical paintings

In the Polish village of Zalipie, all the buildings are covered in painted flowers. Over 100 years ago, when everyone had wood-burning stoves, someone painted a flower on their ceiling to cover a soot stain, and it became a trend. In 1948, the town started an annual painted cottage competition to help recover psychologically from WWII, and now all the homes, churches, bridges and barns are covered in flowers – inside and out. Source Source 2

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10

Details in Blue

  1. Infanta Isabel de Bourbon, 1866, by Vicente Palmaroli y Gonzalez.
  2. Madame Charles Simon Favart, 1757, by François-Hubert Drouais.
  3. Marie-Thérèse de Savoie, 1775, by Jean-Baptiste André Gautier-Dagoty.
  4. Princesse de Broglie, 1853, by Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres.
  5. Admiring the Gift, by Pio Ricci.
  6. Portrait de Philomena Lynch, 1900’s, by Paul Jobert.
  7. Marie-Antoinette with the Rose, 1783, by Louise Élisabeth Vigée Le Brun.
  8. Anne Streatfeild, 1756, by Arthur Devis.
  9. María Isabel Álvarez y Montes, 1868, by Federico Madrazo.
  10. Portrait of Amalia de Llano, 1853, by Federico de Madrazo y Kuntz.
8

Details in Pink 

  1. Afternoon Tea for Three, by Frédéric Soulacroix.
  2. The Love Letter, 1750, by François Boucher.
  3. La Soirée, by Vittorio Reggianini.
  4. Flirtation, by Frédéric Soulacroix.
  5. Une Beauté en Rose, by Marie-Félix Hippolyte-Lucas.
  6. The Artist Marie Suzanne Giroust, 1770, by Alexander Roslin.
  7. Portrait of Mary, Countess of Howe, 1764, by Thomas Gainsborough.
  8. La Jeune Musicienne, 1788, by Michel Garnier.

There used to be a paint made of ground- up Egyptian mummies. ‘Mummy Brown’ was a favorite color of many 19th-century European painters, but some people were so upset by its ingredients, they buried tubes of it in the ground out of respect for the dead. It was still being made up until 1964, when the manufacturer’s ancient mummy supply finally ran out. Source Source 2 Source 3

For example, much of this painting is made of ancient dead people:

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There used to be a paint made of ground- up Egyptian mummies. ‘Mummy Brown’ was a favorite color of many 19th-century European painters, but some people were so upset by its ingredients, they buried tubes of it in the ground out of respect for the dead. It was still being made up until 1964, when the manufacturer’s ancient mummy supply finally ran out. Source Source 2 Source 3

For example, a lot of this painting is made with ancient dead people.

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By Martin Drolling - Web Gallery of Art: Public Domain

5

Thomas Cole (1801-1848)
The Course of Empire:
“The Savage State” (1834)
“The Arcadian” (1834)
“The Consummation of Empire” (1836)
“Destruction” (1836)
“Desolation” (1836)
Oil on canvas
Owned by the New-York Historical Society

The Course of Empire is a five-part series of paintings created by Thomas Cole in the years 1833–36.

The series of paintings depicts the growth and fall of an imaginary city, situated on the lower end of a river valley, near its meeting with a bay of the sea. The valley is distinctly identifiable in each of the paintings, in part because of an unusual landmark: a large boulder is precariously situated atop a crag overlooking the valley.