historical makeup

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 HISTORICALLY ACCURATE MAKEUP : 60′s MOD

Eyes- False eyelashes were HUGE in the 60′s. They became almost an accessory, with some girls even wearing bottom lashes. Mascara could be bought in a tube like we’re used to today, but block mascara could also be purchased. Eyeshadow was a must. Popular formulas were powder, crayon, and cream. Popular colors were purple, green, blue, white and yellow. The mod eye look was the black line in the crease with a pale color on the lid. The dark crease wasn’t blended or smudged, it was a sharp definite arch from inner to outer eye. Eyeliner was also big, continuing from the 50′s. It came in pencil, cake, and liquid. Block mascara was a good alternative if you didn’t have any actual eyeliner on you. Eyeliner was also used to draw on bottom eyelashes (e.g. Twiggy). White liner was used on the water liner to create a wide-eyed look.

Eyebrows- Eyebrows were groomed and shaped with an eyebrow pencil. They could go either way, being pencil thin or fuller ( e.g. Elizabeth Taylor)

Face- Popular blush colors were pinks, corals, and peach and geared toward looking natural. They too came in a variety of formulas including cream, powder, and liquids. They were free from shimmer and glitter (I went against the rules on this and put on some highlighter srry). The skin was kept very matte. Foundation and powder were used, but not all over the face. 

Lips- Popular shades were pale pinks, light reds, corals, and peach. They came in the standard tube and rounded at the tip, shaped like a bullet. Lip liners we’re usually not used, keeping the lips natural and muted. I decided to use one because of numerous pictures I had seen of Priscilla Presley in the 60′s. She usually had a nude lip paired with a darker lip liner.

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HISTORICALLY ACCURATE MAKEUP: 70S DISCO

Eyes - Disco goers usually wore bright eye colors. Popular ones were greens, blues, oranges, and purples. Crease colors weren’t popular and typically one color was worn all over the lid (with an exception of glitter). They were blended out into an almond shape, with no harsh edges or lines. A brow bone highlight was also very popular. Mascara was applied heavily and false eyelashes were typically worn for a more dramatic look. 

Lips - Popular disco colors were pinks, reds, oranges, and purples. All in bright hues and topped with a clear gloss.

Brows - Brows were plucked thin or shaped into an arch. They could be filled in with a brow pencil but there was no drawing on the shape of the brow like today. (Which I totally skipped this step lol)

Face- Skin was dewy and fresh. Not a lot of foundation or concealer was worn. The main focus was blush. It was applied heavily and swept up towards the ears. Highlighter wasn’t a thing at this time but body glitter was available and was applied all over the body and cheeks.

honestly? I only wear pretty makeup so other women will like it. I LOVE seeing pretty makeup on women, it is beautiful. It’s like art. And a lot of times only other women truly appreciate that art. Idgaf what guys think of my makeup, it’s not for them. A guy saying “You’re pretty” gives me nothing. A woman saying “Your makeup looks great!” gives me a happiness/confidence boost for days. The other day my coworker said that she looked at me during a meeting and I turned my head just right and she saw my highlight pop and said it was like *makes angel singing noise* and was beautiful. I almost cried. 

I know that makeup has historically been used to attract the male gaze but really, with the advent of makeup videos and makeup ‘culture’ it’s not even about that anymore. It’s about practicing a skill and getting good at it and showing it off to other practitioners of that skill. Like I said, it’s like art.

doesn’t matter how smart you are when it comes to cosmetics, men will never consider any facet of it “intelligent conversation”. those dudes who are like “i like when I can have an Intelligent Conversation with a woman”, u could literally talk about the chemistry of skincare, the historical development of makeup in ur culture, the art behind an eyeshadow look and the steps used and which shadows and brushes do exactly what in the look, no matter how much you know about it or how scientifically you speak it will never be intelligent to them because it’s not like, sports or civil war history or government conspiracies or whatever