historical children's books

7

Day 344: Warwick Goble


Warwick Goble (22 November 1862 – 22 January 1943) was an illustrator of children’s books. He specialized in Japanese and Indian themes.

Goble was born in Dalston, north London, the son of a commercial traveller, and educated and trained at the City of London School and the Westminster School of Art. He worked for a printer specializing in chromolithography and contributed to the Pall Mall Gazette and the Westminster Gazette.

In the 1890s, he contributed half-tone illustrations to monthly magazines such as Strand Magazine, Pearson’s Magazine, and The Boy’s Own Paper. In 1893, he was exhibiting at the Royal Academy. In 1896, he began illustrating books. In 1898, he was the first to illustrate H. G. Wells’s The War of the Worlds, having illustrated it for Pearson’s Magazine in 1897. He briefly continued with scientific romance themes.

In 1909, he became resident gift book illustrator for MacMillan and produced illustrations for The Water Babies, Green Willow, and Other Japanese Fairy Tales, The Complete Poetical Works of Geoffrey Chaucer, Stories from the Pentamerone, Folk Tales of Bengal, The Fairy Book, and The Book of Fairy Poetry. During World War I, he was employed in the drawing office of Woolrich Arsenal, and volunteered for service with the Red Cross in France. He worked occasionally for New York MacMillan, and produced editions of Treasure Island and Kidnapped. Goble gradually gave up illustration to pursue sculling, cycling, and travelling. He died in his Surrey home in 1943.”

Massive Book Recommendation Post

This is just a big post of some of the books and book series nearest and dearest to my heart. I am often frustrated by reading ruts and wanted to make this to help other people out of them. Feel free to ask me anything about any of these!

                                              Genres

Fantasy:

  • Infernal Devices series
  • Mortal Instruments Series
  • Harry Potter series
  • Under the Never Sky series
  • The Death and Life of Charlie St. Cloud (more paranormal but whatever)
  • Lux series (haven’t finished it but I like it. ps don’t read it if you didn’t like twilight. It was a bit derivative at first)
  • Angelfall
  • Twilight series (I don’t like it nearly as much as I used to, but I feel like a fraud not including it because it has had a special place in my heart.)
  • Song of the Sparrow
  • Beastly
  • Elsewhere (nobody seems to know about this one but I read it in like a night and loved it).
  • A Wrinkle in Time (more children’s sci-fi but whatever it’s amazing)

Dystopias:

  • The Hunger Games series
  • The Selection series
  • The Giver
  • City of Ember

Historical Fiction

  • Angela’s Ashes (memoir)
  • The Other Boleyn Girl
  • Snow Flower and the Secret Fan
  • Memoirs of a Geisha
  • Between Shades of Gray
  • Out of the Dust
  • Small Steps: The Year I Got Polio
  • Gone With the Wind
  • Number the Stars
  • Ophelia (her take on Hamlet)
  • Song of the Sparrow
  • The Birchbark House
  • Fever 1793
  • A Thousand Splendid Suns
  • Night (holocaust memoir)

Contemporary

  • Speak
  • The Da Vinci Code
  • Confessions of a Shopaholic (this is by no means groundbreaking, but it is a fun summer read)
  • Crank
  • Dear John
  • The Secret Life of Bees
  • The Perks of Being a Wallflower
  • Marley and Me
  • The Glass Castle (memoir)

Classics

  • Pride and Prejudice
  • Gone With the Wind
  • The Catcher in the Rye
  • The Great Gatsby
  • A Little Princess
  • Black Beauty
  • To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Romeo and Juliet

Children’s

  • Ida B
  • Frindle
  • Pictures of Hollis Woods
  • Little House of the Prarie series
  • Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes
  • City of Ember
  • Love, Ruby Lavender
  • Small Steps: The Year I Got Polio
  • So B. It
  • The BFG
  • The Witches
  • Gregor the Overlander series (same author as Hunger Games!!)
  • The Tale of Desperaux
  • Where the Sidewalk Ends (poetry)
  • Because of Winn-Dixie
  • Bridge to Terrabithia
  • A Little Princess
  • The Phantom Tollbooth (This book is absolutely brilliant. It takes an adult to fully appreciate it.)
  • Number the Stars
  • Matilda
  • Julie of the Wolves
  • Island of the Blue Dolphins ( I have read this at least 6 times. LOVE.)
  • Hatchet
  • The Birchbark House
  • Esperanza Rising
  • Princess Academy
  • The Goose Girl
  • A Wrinkle in Time
  • Diary of a Wimpy Kid series
  • Walk Two Moons

                                                    Lists

Tearjerkers:

  • Infernal Devices Series
  • Gone With the Wind
  • Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes
  • Angela’s Ashes
  • Between Shades of Gray
  • Out of the Dust
  • A Thousand Splendid Suns
  • Night
  • Dear John
  • Marley and Me
  • Bridge to Terrabithia

Will Make You Think/ Change Your Outlook in Life:

  • A Wrinkle in Time
  • The Da Vinci Code
  • Elsewhere
  • A Thousand Splendid Suns
  • Night
  • Angela’s Ashes
  • Gone With the Wind
  • The Phantom Tollbooth
  • The Great Gatsby
  • The Giver
  • The Glass Castle
  • The Hunger Games

Feel Good:

  • Diary of a Wimpy Kid series (your age is irrelevant you will laugh until you cry)
  • Little House on the Prarie Series (so heartwarming)
  • Mortal Instruments (disclaimer: has it’s fair share of angst, but makes me feel really happy)
  • Matilda
  • Under the Never Sky
  • The Selection
  • Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants series

Epic:

  • Gone With the Wind
  • Harry Potter series
  • Mortal Instruments series
  • Infernal Devices series
  • The Hunger Games series
  • The Da Vinci Code
  • Twilight series
  • Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes

Best Romance:

  • Infernal Devices series
  • Mortal Instruments series
  • Dear John
  • Twilight series
  • Under the Never Sky series
  • Gone With the Wind
  • Pride and Prejudice
  • The Last Song
  • Romeo and Juliet
  • Lux series
  • Song of the Sparrow

My Blacklist- Do yourself a favor and don’t read these:

  • The Acorn People
  • Lord of the Flies
  • Matched
  • Daisy Miller
  • Animal Farm
  • Beauty Queens
  • The Handmaid’s Tale

Overrated in My Opinion:

  • The Darkest Minds
  • Divergent
  • The Host
  • Shatter Me
  • Graceling
  • Sarah Dessen books in general
  • A Walk to Remember

My Ultimate Recommendations- The Best of the Best:

  • Infernal Devices series: This series by Cassandra Clare is the single most heartbreaking thing that I have ever read. It has a perfectly formed romance that manages to be unique from anything else that I have ever read. The plot twists and turns like a roller coaster. The characters are complex and so emotionally ensnaring. This series, similar to Harry Potter, got better and better with every book. The end can be described as nothing other than perfect- completely bittersweet and perfect.
  • Mortal Instruments Series: This series is also written by Cassandra Clare, and is a sister series to Infernal Devices. Although it is set in 2007, while Infernal devices is set in the 1880’s, some characters are shared. There are many connections between the series as well, which make it all the more fun to read! This, while being perhaps a little more fun that Infernal Devices is dwarfed by the utter perfection in Infernal Devices in my opinion. However, it does hold its own as one of my favorite series. The characters are often comical, and that provides a certain levity. This book is filled to the brim with plot twists. The last book is set to be released in May.
  • Gone With the Wind: I will never understand why this book doesn’t have a fandom of its own. It is a sweeping epic set during the civil war, following a young woman named Scarlett O'Hara. She is an absolute firecracker. Spoiled, unrelenting, and tenacious, she the most interesting character that I have ever read. If you like the strong, Katniss Everdeen type, you would like the female lead. You will want to slap her sometimes and you will want to hug her sometimes. Her harrowing journey will have you up reading until 3 AM. This book is huge, but you will be glad once you get into it. I would give it a hundred pages to get into it (but being it is a 1000 pg novel, that’s nothing). But once you are hooked, there is no going back. This novel is so unbelievably epic. Suddenly, there is meaning given to the civil war, and you can feel how everything is on the line. This is one of those books that my mind wanders to occasionally because there is just so much to think about. This book taught me a thing or two about love, loss, and courage. The end of this book is among the best I have ever read. It showed how unrelenting the human spirit can be. It showed the change in our beloved Scarlet, and also in ourselves as readers. This is not a happy book, but it is fantastic.
  • Harry Potter: I think I can be pretty brief with this one. Harry Potter is epic, a whole new world. It is something that people of all ages and background can draw strength from, something to give hope.
  • The Hunger Games Series: Again, I can be quick with this one. Great, compelling series. Very quick and action packed, you will read this very quickly. A great series that perfectly lays out real problems in a dystopian world.
  • Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes: About a young Japanese girl who is diagnosed with Leukemia after being exposed to radiation from the atomic bombs during WWII. This is the story of her battle. I read this in fourth grade, and it was the first book that made me break down into a real crying spat. Although it is a children’s book, it can be enjoyed by anyone.
  • Angela’s Ashes : This is a memoir written my a man who was a young boy in Ireland during the great potato famine. Being a real look into an awful situation, this book is very sad. The story is about he and his family enduring life during the famine. Overall, a great book.

These are my opinions, so obviously, this won’t be the same for everyone, but this will give you a pretty good idea of whether or not our reading tastes match. These are not all of the book that I have ever liked, just some that have particularly stood out to me. I tend to lean towards young adult, fantasy, and historical fiction, although I do like to read a bit of everything. I included a children’s section because so many of the books I love are ones I read when I was a child. I do believe that most on that list would still be enjoyed by adults, however. Sometimes, we all need to satisfy the child in us :).

The Birth of Black America: The First African Americans and the Pursuit of Freedom at Jamestown

Tim Hashaw

The voyage that shaped early America was neither that of the Susan Constant in 1607 nor the Mayflower in 1620. Absolutely vital to the formation of English-speaking America was the voyage made by some sixty Africans stolen from a Spanish slave ship and brought to the young struggling colony of Jamestown in 1619. It was an act of colonial piracy that angered King James I of England, causing him to carve up the Virginia Company’s monopoly for virtually all of North America. It was an infusion of brave and competent souls who were essential to Jamestown’s survival and success. And it was the arrival of pioneers who would fire the first salvos in the centuries-long African-American battle for liberation. Until now, it has been buried by historians. Four hundred years after the birth of English-speaking America, as a nation turns its attention to its ancestry, The Birth of Black America reconstructs the true origins of the United States and of the African-American experience.

One day I would have all the books in the world, shelves and shelves of them. I would live my life in a tower of books. I would read all day long and eat peaches. And if any young knights in armor dared to come calling on their white chargers and plead with me to let down my hair, I would pelt them with peach pits until they went home.
—  Jacqueline Kelly, The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate

anonymous asked:

Are you still taking prompts? I'm not sure, but if you are, some e/R would be lovely, coffee shop au? (or any equivalent. library au, bakery au, etc.)

The first time Grantaire meets the head of the local Local Business Association, he’s been up since three in the morning baking and he has flour all over his face. He knows this because Eponine polished up the glass display case for their baked goods when she came in at quarter to seven and he can see his reflection in it, and his reflection has white flour standing out on his face and hair.

“You’re the owner of Sticks and Scones,” the stranger across the counter informs him, like he doesn’t already know.

“I regret that situation every time my alarm wakes me up before dawn,” he says solemnly. “Can I ask who you are? And why Eponine fetched me out of the back and the holy ritual of the scones-are-baking mini-nap to see you?”

The stranger across the counter (who is, upon further examination, maybe the most beautiful single human being Grantaire has ever met and probably the second-grumpiest) holds out his hand to shake and doesn’t even flinch when he ends up with flour on his hand. “I’m Enjolras, and I own the Fair Trade grocery down the street, and I’m the head of the Local Business Association for the town, fighting to keep our main street locally owned. I thought I’d give you a few weeks to settle in before I came to speak to you.”

Grantaire turns plaintively to Eponine, who’s coaxing the coffee machine into producing sweet nectar. “You interrupted me for this?”

“Do you want to go back to sticking pans of pre-made shit in the oven at Starbucks?” she asks. “Because we can arrange that.”

“We have a very active downtown, and we’re trying to keep it that way,” Enjolras forges on. “We frequently have events, and rewards for shopping at multiple stores, and other arrangements to attract business to the area, and we hope that you’ll join us. It’s been a while since we had a bakery downtown, and we’re very glad to have you.”

Eponine elbows him, and Grantaire realizes he’s probably staring stupidly. “I’m just here to bake bread,” he says.

“If you’ll just listen to what I have to say, I promise you won’t regret the opportunity.”

Grantaire sighs and grabs a few of his best croissants out of the case, and a jar of peach-raspberry jam, hand-canned by him last summer, out of where they keep their condiments. “Sit down, we’ll have something to eat and you can tell me about your crusade to save the world one downtown at a time.”

An hour later, Enjolras has eaten two croissants with jam, one almond poppyseed muffin, and one savoury scone, all with increasing looks of surprise and muffled pornographic noises, and he and Grantaire have had no less than three arguments about corporate sponsorship, the future of the downtown, and how much harm discounts do businesses.

He expects Enjolras to leave in a snit, but instead when he’s ready to leave, he holds out his hand to shake again and smiles. “I’ll look forward to working with you, Grantaire.”

“You too,” says Grantaire, almost by accident, and sees him out the door, the shop bell tinkling as he goes.

It isn’t until he looks at the display case again that he realizes he never managed to brush the flour off his face.