historical archives

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Dedicated to the memory of Steve Jobs, Designed by Apple in California is a new photo book that chronicles two decades of gorgeous Apple design. The 450 images in the book were shot in a deliberately spare style and cover products from 1998’s iMac to 2015’s Apple Pencil. Printed on specially milled, custom-dyed paper with gilded matte silver edges and completed with a foreword by Jony Ive, this coffee table book is equal parts design porn and historical archive for all the Apple products that put the company on the map.

FN-2187: criminal; hero

FN-2187 was at the top of his cadet class at the First Order before he became the Order’s worst failure. 

He scored better than anyone in marksmanship - and knew his way around a blaster better than some of the Troopers did. He was brilliant, great at thinking on his feet and at remembering the Order’s lessons. He advanced through the Academy and was specially trained in weaponry. He was also a voracious reader. Every chance he got, every moment not spent in weapons training or hand to hand combat training, or tactics and strategy training was spent on reading.

The First Order had learned from the Empire’s mistakes, and never archived its data in one location. Instead, information was stored in small well protected hubs all across the galaxy. Every time they made ports to refuel or for training simulations or to fight the Resistance, FN-2187 made sure to download more information onto his datapad.

He read everything, but was most interested in the historical archives, the ones the Order spent the least time teaching the cadets. He read about Lord Vader, of whom Ren was so fond, and about the lone Jedi - Skywalker - who supposedly destroyed the Death Star, killed the Sith and ended the Empire. The Order hated Skywalker, because he brought disorder and chaos to the galaxy and destroyed the peace and order the Emperor had wrought when he ended the weak Jedi order. FN-2187 held his blaster on training missions and didn’t feel at peace.

FN-2187 read one missive over and over though, and it had little to do with Skywalker. It was about an act of Rebellion that started on a planet called Jedha and ended on the old data archival base at Scarif. It was used as a warning message, was the reason the Order’s data archives were spread so ar and wide, was the reason that all Troopers had to check in so often with their commanding officers, was the reason Security was one of the most important positions one could hold. 

Two rebels in particular stood out to him in the grainy holo footage and to the point computer outputs. They were both pilots. One flew cargo and defected from the Empire - Bodhi Rook, a traitor to Peace. Rook had been allowed to work on the Death Star and had been the reason the Rebellion broke through the shield gate over Scarif. It was his fault the data archival tower had been destroyed. The other pilot belonged to the Rebellion and worked in Intelligence and Recruiting. The Empire never learned his name, but it blamed him for the blueprints of the Death Star being lost. They were both the worst kind of criminals, in the eyes of the Order. FN-2187 thought they might have been heroes.

(((I’m sure Finn knew all about the story of Rogue One - or at least, whatever information the Order might have had. When he meets Han, he’s shocked, and it slips out: “Wasn’t he the war hero?” Finn must have read about Han, Luke, and Leia - and about the RO crew too. I bet he was a little afraid of Bodhi’s story but fantasized a little bit about being Cassian, who was never under the Empire’s yoke. He definitely mentally compared Poe to Cassian and himself to Bodhi. When he faced off against Ren on Starkiller Base, he probably hoped he’d be as brave as Rook must have been when he died.)))

Companion piece to these: Hero for a Rey | FN-2187: criminal; hero | Cassian the recruiter | The truth of Bodhi Rook | Thank you General

When I began this research in 1991 I embarked on a quest to turn up the volume on the stories of gender and sexuality that have been dubbed out of the Chicano historical record. Through this journey I found that being an oral historian is like being a DJ. As one digs through the old crates of records (historical archives) to find missing stories, the songs (narrative grooves, if you will) must be selected and their elements remixed to produce new meanings. Oral historians spin the historical record by sampling new voices and cutting and mixing the established soundscape to allow listeners to hear something different, even in grooves they thought they knew.
—  Maylei Blackwell | ¡Chicana Power!: Contested Histories of Feminism in the Chicano Movement | 2011 

250 years after humanity develops interstellar travel, alien ruins are discovered in another star system. A historical archive is found and translated. The last entry reads “Species 57 has escaped from prison planet 50L-3. Evacuation has begun.”

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SP GS-2 4414 by Robert Thomson
Via Flickr:
Scanned Photo Postcard Scan is presented for historical/archival purposes No copyright is claimed or intended From the back of the card: “…The train in this picture appears to be the original 14-car Daylight pulled by one of the first streamlined 4-8-4’s, No. 4414, built in 1936 for the new train which went into service that year. Since the position of the sun indicates a time somewhat after noon, about three hours after the Daylight was scheduled to pass this point [horseshoe curve near Chatsworth, California], waht we see here is probably a trial run to test the locomotives, cars and timing. The Daylight train was a highly successful attempt by the Southern Pacific to recover passenger traffic which had fallen to below standard level during the business depression of the early 1930’s… Southern Pacific” The post card was published by Vanishing Vistas of Sacramento, CA in 1974. The photo is courtesy Southern Pacific Railroad, the text by Robert A. Le Massena.

flickr

SP San Joaquin Daylight by Robert Thomson
Via Flickr:
Scanned Photo Postcard Scan is presented for historical/archival purposes No copyright is claimed or intended From the back of the card: “Southern Pacific train No. 52, the southbound "San Joaquin Daylight,” running near Lathrop in its namesake San Joaquin Valley of California behind a specially skirted P-10 4-6-2 during the early 1940’s. Inaugurated as a day train, the “San Joaquin Flyer,” on March 20, 1927, trains 51 and 52 became the streamlined “Daylights” on July 4, 1941. It wasn’t a completely streamlined train, however, as some of its cars, notably the diners and lounges, were reconditioned heavy-weights repainted to match the “Daylight” coaches. For a few years during W.W. II, from January 5, 1942, to April 12, 1946, the “San Joaquin” was completely streamlined using the triple-unit diner and other cars from the “Noon Daylight” which was temporarily discontinued during the war. Three class P-10 4-6-2’s (# 2484-2486) were “Daylighted” in 1941 to power the new streamliner, although they were soon replaced by heavier MT-4 4-8-2’s and “GS” 4-8-4’s as the train increased in length. Southern Pacific" The post card was published by Vanishing Vistas of Sacramento, CA. The photo is courtesy Southern Pacific Railroad.

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SP GS-4 4458 by Robert Thomson
Via Flickr:
Scanned Photo Postcard Scan is presented for historical/archival purposes No copyright is claimed or intended From the back of the card: “Southern Pacific Co. Southern Pacific GS-5 No. 4458 pauses with the "Coast Daylight” to load passengers at Santa Barbara, California, on its way from Los Angeles to San Francisco.“ The post card was published by Lyman E. Cox of Sacramento, CA. The photo is courtesy Southern Pacific Railroad.

Image found in a file folder in the historical society archives, under “Miscellaneous.” Other items filed under “Miscellaneous” include numerous manuals for appliances, somebody’s tax return (you know who you are), an extremely moldy grilled cheese sandwich and a birdhouse completely covered in duct tape.

The birdhouse was removed and filed more safely. The sandwich was thrown away.

archiveofourown.org
See The Sparks Filled With Hope (You Are Not Alone)
By Organization for Transformative Works

“Hello,” Niall mumbled, hot flush already crawling up his neck again. “I should…I won’t keep you from your work.”
Zayn sighed a little and rubbed at his forehead, leaving a small smudge of dirt behind. Niall’s fingers twitched with how much he wanted to reach out and wipe it away.

Ireland, 1923.
When Niall returns from war, he’s not the same young man he was before. Back home at his parent’s mansion, it takes an old friend and young gardener to get him to open up. But what is Zayn to Niall? What can he be?

Written By: kissingziall

chaptered + historic/au + angst

Note: I’m sitting here in awe at this. It’s like a combination of The Notebook and The Secret Garden. Which are some of my favorite pieces of media of all time. But I am a history nut so this was so exciting for me. I can’t divulge too much due to it being chock full of everything but it slow burned me into crying at many points. 

:: spirits, soul meets body, when you were young

- Kendra

flickr

SP 6040, 5902 & 1 more by Robert Thomson
Via Flickr:
Scanned Photo Postcard Scan is presented for historical/archival purposes No copyright is claimed or intended From the back of the card: “An hour and a quarter out of Los Angeles and yet another hour from its first mainline stop at Santa Barbara, Southern Pacific train No. 99, the famed "Coast Daylight,” accelerates past a giant pepper tree after passing through Camarillo on the first leg of its all day run to San Francisco in the late 1950’s. On the head end, Alco PA-3 [sic] #6040, built in 1953, leads a pair of units from rival E.M.D., E-7B # 5902, built in 1947 and one of hte first postwar passenger units delivered to Southern Pacific, and an unidentified E-9 A, one of the last group of passenger cab units built in 1954-1955. Southern Pacific.“ The post card was published by Vanishing Vistas of Sacramento, CA. The photo is courtesy Southern Pacific. SP PA2 6040 SP E7B 5902

Džabija Muraga Haraminčić posing next to a gusla player, © The Historical Archive of Sarajevo

Džabija Muraga Haraminčić was a teacher at Gajret, the Muslim society for the advancement and promotion of middle and high schools in Bosnia and Herzegovina. It was founded in 1903 by Mirza Safvet beg Bašagić and Edhem Mulabdić. The photograph was taken some time in between 1903 and 1918. 

flickr

SP 6333 & 3 more w/the San Joaquin Daylight by Robert Thomson
Via Flickr:
Scanned Photo Postcard Scan is presented for historical/archival purposes No copyright is claimed or intended From the back of the card: “Southern Pacific train No. 52, the southbound "San Joaquin Daylight,” running south of Caliente in the Tehachapi Mountains of Southern California in January, 1960. Southern Pacific" The post card was published by Vanishing Vistas of Sacramento, CA. The photo is courtesy Southern Pacific. SP F7A 6333

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“It is time to understand where we come from.”

Diego Huerta takes extraordinary photographs showcasing the culture and customs of indigenous communities in Mexico. In 2011, he photographed more than 31,000 people in Mexico and the U.S. as a tribute to the 31,000 deaths that have resulted from the drug war, and “to symbolize recovering public spaces that were lost because of conflict,” he says.

With the photobook Native Nation, Huerta hopes to create a historical archive that celebrates and preserves these indigenous communities, cultures, and traditions. “I will visit their towns, outlying valleys, mountains, deserts, and jungles, documenting every detail of my long journey,” he says. “Sometimes you need to cross mountains and lakes, walk day and night. There are times that you spend all of your energy for one portrait. But at the end of the day, everything is worth it.”

Support the project here.

I think the greatest argument against the possibility of karma based reincarnation is the fact that I’ve searched through many historical archives, read through the most evil, and inhuman depravity imaginable, from the brutality if the Assyrians, to Unit 731, to the medical experiments of Auschwitz, and I have not found a single deed so vile and horrid to merit being born a liberal.

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Girl’s Book of Famous Queens // 1887 // Lydia H. Farmer

This book is a pretty comprehensive list of great and famous queens throughout history.

The author, Lydia Hoyt Farmer, wrote a number of books in her life, for which she became somewhat well-known. Her obituary, from 1903, can even still be viewed on the New York Times website.

From the Rare Books and Manuscripts Collection. Photographed and written by Shafer Ross.

Doing some archival work for a project, and I keep coming across this ad from 1911 for beds that can be stored in an armoire. It’s a pretty great looking design, and from first glance looks to be more user-friendly than a Murphy bed, though it probably does take up more space than a wall mounted bed would.