historic auto racing

6

While it seems that the 917 gets all the Porsche endurance racer love, I’ve always preferred the pretty 910 (and it’s development the 907). Where the 917 is an awesome, brutal wedge, these earlier cars are more appealing to me; curvacious yet dainty, and super-lightweight. This is from last year’s AvD Oldtimer GP.

5

Need an open space to fight an alien invasion, or explore a pirate’s world? Maybe a deserted location to land a plane? Or maybe you just have a need for speed.  Not a problem - we’ve got you covered with our countdown to the #Oscars. Follow along as we feature public lands that double as movie sets.

Managed by the BLM as an Area of Critical Environmental Concern and Special Recreation Management Area, the Bonneville Salt Flats are a 30,000 acre expanse of hard, white salt crust on the western edge of the Great Salt Lake basin in Utah. “Bonneville” is also on the National Register of Historic Landmarks because of its contribution to land speed racing. The salt flats are about 12 miles long and 5 miles wide with total area coverage of just over 46 square miles. Near the center of the salt, the crust is almost 5 feet thick in places, with the depth tapering off to less than 1 inch as you get to the edges. Total salt crust volume has been estimated at 147 million tons or 99 million cubic yards of salt!

The remote and rugged Bonneville Salt Flats serve as a fitting backdrop for Independence Day, Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End, Con Air, The World’s Fastest Indian, Mulholland Falls, and many more films.

Learn more about the history of this unique location: http://on.doi.gov/1EuCmOU

9

Usually when I’m considering an Auto Focus post, it’s a single car that is piquing my interest…but in this case, the pretty 356A of Steve Wright and Ian Clark is only part of the story. What really grabbed my attention at the Donington Historic was the pair of split-screen campers that complete this crew, one as a tow vehicle and the other, I’m guessing, as team transport and hospitality. These guys aren’t just racing in style, they’re arriving in style too!

2

This week was to be the 100th anniversary of “Speed Week” at Bonneville Salt Flats but summer thunderstorms covered the flats with water forcing the cancellation of the event.  That didn’t stop  small crowd from gathering at the end of the access road to the salt flats Sunday night to watch a beautiful sunset followed by an appearance of the super moon.  I walked out into the shallow water to shoot back at the sunset – almost looks like everyone is sitting on an island.

Managed by the BLM as an Area of Critical Environmental Concern and Special Recreation Management Area, the Bonneville Salt Flats are a 30,000 acre expanse of hard, white salt crust on the western edge of the Great Salt Lake basin in Utah. “Bonneville” is also on the National Register of Historic Landmarks because of its contribution to land speed racing.

The salt flats are about 12 miles long and 5 miles wide with total area coverage of just over 46 square miles. Near the center of the salt, the crust is almost 5 feet thick in places, with the depth tapering off to less than 1 inch as you get to the edges. Shallow ground water flows from the surrounding watershed, picks up dissolved minerals along the way, and percolates up to Salt Flats’ surface. During the cooler months (November to May), this groundwater floods the Salt Flats several inches deep. When temperatures rise in late spring and summer, the salty water rapidly evaporates in the heat, and minerals are left behind to form new salt crust.  Wind, periodic rainstorms, and regional climate also play an important part in changing salt crust conditions throughout each year.  The stratified layers that form the salt flats are almost 5 feet thick near the center and only an inch or two at the outer edges. The Salt Flats are just over 46 square miles in size (30,000 acres) which equates to about 147 million tons, or 99 million cubic yards, of salt!

Photo and narrative by Bob Wick, BLM Wilderness Specialist