hispano moresque

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Frank Cadogan Cowper - Venetian Ladies Listening to the Serenade [1909] by Gandalf’s Gallery

<br /><i>Via Flickr:</i>
<br />Detailing the luxurious textiles of the figures’ gowns, as well as the kilim rug hung over the balustrade, faience tile floor and Hispano Moresque lustreware albarello with flowers, echoes the renewed interest in the applied arts and crafts which emerged in late nineteenth century British art. When the present work was exhibited at the Royal Academy, critics observed that &quot;this use of colour is well enough in the place in such a picture as Mr. Cadogan Cowper's Venetian Ladies Listening to the Serenade, the clearly defined differences of hue enhancing in this instance the impression of the immobility of the listeners. The masses of warm colour to the left of the composition are handsome and splendid... Finery seems in increasing degree of preoccupation of Mr. Cowper.”

[Sotheby’s, New York - Oil on canvas, 88.9 x 128.9 cm]

flickr

Frank Cadogan Cowper - Venetian Ladies Listening to the Serenade [1909] by Gandalf
Via Flickr:
Detailing the luxurious textiles of the figures’ gowns, as well as the kilim rug hung over the balustrade, faience tile floor and Hispano Moresque lustreware albarello with flowers, echoes the renewed interest in the applied arts and crafts which emerged in late nineteenth century British art. When the present work was exhibited at the Royal Academy, critics observed that “this use of colour is well enough in the place in such a picture as Mr. Cadogan Cowper’s Venetian Ladies Listening to the Serenade, the clearly defined differences of hue enhancing in this instance the impression of the immobility of the listeners. The masses of warm colour to the left of the composition are handsome and splendid… Finery seems in increasing degree of preoccupation of Mr. Cowper.” 

[Sotheby’s, New York - Oil on canvas, 88.9 x 128.9 cm]

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Hispano-Moresque ware is a style of initially Islamic pottery created in Al Andalus or Muslim Spain, which continued to be produced under Christian rule in styles blending Islamic and European elements. It was the most elaborate and luxurious pottery being produced in Europe until the Italian maiolica industry developed sophisticated styles in the 15th century, and was exported over most of Europe. The industry’s most successful period was the 14th and 15th centuries.

Top Image: Valencia, c.1430-1500

Bottom image: Manises dish, 1430-1450