his name is oscar

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[images: oscar isaac, gina torres, lorenzo henrie and floriana lima]

White Italians like Floriana Lima and Lorenzo Henrie audition for Latinx roles and get them without an issue. Both Lima and Henrie have played around a dozen latinxs each, and Lorenzo himself admits that he auditions mostly for roles a Latino (x / Edit: article is just source for the quote, the rest is a mess).

Meanwhile, Oscar Isaac had to change his name to start getting roles and avoid being typecast in “gangster” and other stereotypical racist roles (x). Gina Torres has spent her career being denied roles as Latina because people “want Latinas to look Italian, not like [her]” (x).  

So no, it’s not okay that these white non-Latinxs are playing Latinxs of color. They are directly complicit in the lack of opportunities that actual Latinxs of color have to face constantly, and they are guilty of spreading a white-washed image of “the good Latinxs” as vaguely tan white people with an Hispanic-sounding name instead of the incredible variety of people we actually are.

Fuck @themarysue for defending this racist bullshit, fuck both of them an all other Italians, Portuguese and Spaniards stealing roles from marginalized actors in Hollywood, and fuck anyone else who wants to say this is okay.

PS: before I get any bullshit questions, here is the criteria of why a person can’t be Latinx if their ancestors haven’t been born in Latin America, and here is why “olive skinned” Italians are white unless they are mixed.

Ph. by Greg Williams.


‘Taboo’ Star Tom Hardy on Being a “Dick” and Those 'Star Wars’ Rumors

The Oscar nominee and star/EP of FX’s 19th-century period drama admits he’s earned his fierce reputation: “I’ve been a dick. But then, who hasn’t?”   

If you believe everything you read, Tom Hardy is the best actor of his generation and also the most dangerous. Descriptors like “volatile” and “mercurial” trail his name, as do tales of on-set squabbles. But as the Oscar-nominated actor, best known for his roles in Mad Max: Fury Road, The Revenant and The Dark Knight Rises, arrives at The Ritz-Carlton on a snowy Manhattan morning to promote his 19th century drama Taboo for FX and the BBC, it’s hard to reconcile that image with the man seated before me. Between puffs of his e-cigarette, a thoughtful and exceedingly self-aware Hardy, 39, who both stars in and executive produces the limited series, spoke candidly about playing “scary blokes,” learning to love the awards circuit and just about anything but those Star Wars rumors.

Profiles of you typically include references to your “dangerous” reputation …

There’s this myth, which is quite asinine, that circulates about me — usually by those who haven’t worked with me. There’s only one thing worse than being talked about and that’s not being talked about in this game so I’d rather it be that, I guess. But there are other people who I work with consistently who know that’s not the case — who just wouldn’t risk having somebody like that in their midst because there’s too much at stake. Obviously you’re going to rub people the wrong way … and I’ve been a dick. But then, who hasn’t?

Is that reputation helpful when you play dark characters as you do on Taboo?

Of course. And I play a lot of scary blokes, and there are probably a few reasons why. First, villains are much more interesting than hero leads, who are, for the most part, really boring. The thought of going into work day in and day out to play someone who is just mind-numbingly boring fills me with dread, so I don’t bother. Another part of it is when I was younger I remember being frightened a lot — of being small and skinny and vulnerable and feeling that I could have been preyed upon easily. So, everything that I play is what scared me.

Keep reading

Interview at THR : 

‘Taboo’ Star Tom Hardy on Being a “Dick” and Those 'Star Wars’ Rumors

The Oscar nominee and star/EP of FX’s 19th-century period drama admits he’s earned his fierce reputation: “I’ve been a dick. But then, who hasn’t?”

If you believe everything you read, Tom Hardy is the best actor of his generation and also the most dangerous. Descriptors like “volatile” and “mercurial” trail his name, as do tales of on-set squabbles. But as the Oscar-nominated actor, best known for his roles in Mad Max: Fury Road, The Revenant and The Dark Knight Rises, arrives at The Ritz-Carlton on a snowy Manhattan morning to promote his 19th century drama Taboo for FX and the BBC, it’s hard to reconcile that image with the man seated before me. Between puffs of his e-cigarette, a thoughtful and exceedingly self-aware Hardy, 39, who both stars in and executive produces the limited series, spoke candidly about playing “scary blokes,” learning to love the awards circuit and just about anything but those Star Wars rumors.

Profiles of you typically include references to your “dangerous” reputation …

There’s this myth, which is quite asinine, that circulates about me — usually by those who haven’t worked with me. There’s only one thing worse than being talked about and that’s not being talked about in this game so I’d rather it be that, I guess. But there are other people who I work with consistently who know that’s not the case — who just wouldn’t risk having somebody like that in their midst because there’s too much at stake. Obviously you’re going to rub people the wrong way … and I’ve been a dick. But then, who hasn’t?

Is that reputation helpful when you play dark characters as you do on Taboo?

Of course. And I play a lot of scary blokes, and there are probably a few reasons why. First, villains are much more interesting than hero leads, who are, for the most part, really boring. The thought of going into work day in and day out to play someone who is just mind-numbingly boring fills me with dread, so I don’t bother. Another part of it is when I was younger I remember being frightened a lot — of being small and skinny and vulnerable and feeling that I could have been preyed upon easily. So, everything that I play is what scared me.

I’ve heard you say that you’re not “an ambassador” in the way a Matt Damon or your pal Leonardo DiCaprio is. What does that mean?

There’s a certain etiquette that comes with a very well-trained public persona, and I’ll probably get better as I get older but there’s a lack of filter for me in conversation.

Which can be refreshing …

It can be but at the same time it also opens one up to attack. But then you create this persona and you got to f—ing live in it, man — and it’s better to be seen as fierce than it is to be seen as something else sometimes in this job because there’s an element of danger that is required to the work.

You sat out the PR circuit during Oscar season last year when you were a supporting actor nominee for The Revenant. Are you more willing to play the game now?

Where relevant, I guess. But work is king for me, so if anyone comes and says, “Listen, we need you to flounce about in a f—ing dinner jacket,” I’m like, “No, I’ve got a job to do, and I’ll stay all night to do it.” Then we can flounce around court and posture and say how wonderful each other are. But if the work is good and you did your best, that really should be the prize. Interestingly enough though, now that I have been part of a lot of teams that I really care about, I’m really excited to celebrate their success in that world. I guess I just don’t feel like I belong.

When was the last time in this business that you felt like you didn’t belong?

The Oscars. Someone once said to me, “You’re not prepared to f— politely — metaphorically speaking — and that’s what court is.” But I’m over here when you need me. I’m one of the people on the squad who can get shit done. But I’m really happy that my wife and I have a photograph of us at the 88th [Academy Awards]. I’m in a tuxedo, and she’s in this beautiful dress and she looks gorgeous, and it’s like, “Whoa, that’s actually a piece of history,” and I would never have thought of that happening.

You didn’t think you’d be there or you didn’t think you’d enjoy it?

Both. And it was a lot to take in and lots of nerves, and I was extremely grateful to have not had my name called out. When Mark Rylance won, I was like, “Yeah.”

Had you prepared a speech?

No. I didn’t expect to win and was really grateful that I didn’t because it would be really terrifying to have to speak. I’m not ready for that. I get very scared of being exposed. … You’re not a character [on that stage]. And a lot of people have a sophisticated persona but I don’t. I haven’t paid enough attention on that front.

Taboo is your first collaboration with your father, who comes from the world of advertising. What precipitated it?

My dad writes, too. I went to him and I said, “Dad, I have this idea. I’d really like to play this character who does this.” I pitched him the world and the tone and the character, and he was like, “Thanks, son, can you get out of my office? I’m working on a book.” (Laughs.) I was like, “OK, just so you know, that’s something I would really like to do.” And I left it at that. I kicked it around a bit with some other people, and then it died a natural death. Then about eight months later, he came through with a treatment. He’d been quietly chipping away on it, and his treatment was awesome. We pitched it to Steve Knight, who I had done Locke and some Peaky [Blinders] with, and he came onboard.

This was the first time you’ve worn multiple hats on a project. What did you learn about yourself?

It was like university for me because I’d never done a short film or anything like that. I never really finished school properly or got my degree or anything. What was nice was I was allowed to observe from a position of having a relative amount of experience from working with some amazing film directors and talents in my career. But learning to move between departments was different to being employed to participate in somebody else’s infrastructure. I learned that I actually feel very comfortable as part of that infrastructure and that there are parts of me that really do enjoy the benefit of being able to look behind the curtain at what the problem could be, whether it’s financial or logistical, and help find a solution. When you’re working on somebody else’s job, you’re not allowed behind the curtain so you just get fed a lot of bullshit. Which is cool because you don’t need to know necessarily — it’s not your business — but there is a part of me that goes, “But I could help and I really want to help.”

As soon as you wrapped, you went to work on Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk. How challenging was it to go back to wearing just one hat?

It was great but that’s because Chris is firing on all cylinders in every aspect. There’s a genuine feeling of security with him. He has his signature on absolutely everything and he is still open to best idea wins, which is a profoundly confident [place to be]. But I used to irritate other directors, I’m sure, before I had the opportunity to do Taboo because I had that drive to be a bit more than just an actor. Not just because I want more meat in a hamburger or I want to be heard; it’s that I really care about problem-solving. I can do the acting relatively easily at this point, so my energy is kind of, “Oh, how can we make it better? I want to help the team.” But the team just wants you to “shut up because the team needs to think.” (Laughs.) It’s like, “But I’m on the team! I want to help you think.” “Just f—ing shut up, OK.” So now I have that place where I can go.

Taboo is being billed as a limited series. Would you like to do more?

Yeah, there is a mythology to it so we can and I love being in production. I definitely want to continue down that road. I have no desire to be an auteur visionary director but I do love being part of the machinery and the infrastructure, as well as the writing and acting.

At this stage of your career, how are you choosing projects?

It’s always been first come, first serve, whatever is interesting, whenever I’ve got time.

Leo was the one who brought you The Revenant, yes?

Yeah, I read that [script] a bit and I was like, “It’s Davy Crockett. I ain’t feeling it.” (Laughs.)

That wasn’t an easy shoot …

Actually, it was a lot easier than Taboo. But I had no control on The Revenant whereas in Taboo I was responsible and accountable for so many different things.

Did you call up Alejandro Inarritu, Revenant’s director, after Taboo and say, “Now I get it”?

No. (Laughs.) I do get a lot of things now, but also I’m aware that there were certain things that I did get at the time — that there were things that I wasn’t privy to because of my position in the team that I could have probably helped with and instead I irritated people. But I was right to pursue going into production of my own. I have a place to go now. So yeah, I do feel sorry for producers now to a degree, but also I’ve created a monster in that now I know as well.

Final question: Rumor has it you’re going to be a Stormtrooper in the next Star Wars movie. True?

I don’t know if I can even say that. Where did you hear that?

The internet.

Ah, the internet is a glorious web of deceit and misinformation, isn’t it? (Laughs.)

So that’s misinformation?

It could be, couldn’t it?

The eight-part 19th century drama, in which Hardy stars as an adventurer, presumed to be long dead, who returns home after years away to find his recently deceased father has bequeathed him an unusual inheritance, premieres Jan. 10 on FX. It airs first on the BBC.

Hi my name is Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde and I have long ebony black hair with purple streaks and red tips that reaches my mid-back and icy blue eyes like limpid tears and a lot of people tell me I look like walt whitman (AN: if u don’t know who she is get da hell out of here!). I’m not related to achilles but I wish I was because he’s a major fucking hottie. I’m a vampire but my teeth are straight and white. I have pale white skin. I’m also a playwrite, and I live in a magic place called London in England. I’m an aesthete  (in case you couldn’t tell) and I wear mostly green. I love green carnations and I wear them every day. For example today I was wearing a black suit with matching lace around it and a black leather cape, a green carnation and black combat boots. I was walking outside my house. It was snowing and raining so there was no sun, which I was very happy about. The marquess de Queensberry stared at me. I put up my middle finger at him.

Ebert: I read that DeNiro really drove a cab to prepare for this role.

Scorsese: Yeah. I drove with him several nights. He got a strange feeling when he was hacking. He was totally anonymous. People would say anything, do anything in the backseat - it was like he didn’t exist. Finally a guy gets in, a former actor, who recognizes his name on the license. “Jesus,” he says, “last year you won the Oscar and now you’re driving a cab again.”

Anyone upset Oscar and Charlie(i think that’s his name) are trying to manipulate mike into a trade and make him think it’s his idea? He’s been on the team so long and to then try to do that to him, I feel so wronged on behalf of him. I don’t know much, if anything, about Baseball so I don’t know if this is normal. After the last episode, my heart just hurts for him and to do this to him=-’[. And then he’s fighting with Ginny, so much angst.

This is the corresponding Oscar Isaac interview podcast (recorded 21st May, 2013) referred to in my photo post immediately below. (Unfortunately, Tumblr won’t allow me to post audio and photos in the same entry.)

I love the fact that Oscar says his full name in its entirety at the beginning of the podcast. I’ve never heard him say it aloud anywhere else. 😊

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a bunch of busts during streams or just wind down draws -lies on the floor-

-sighs-

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Characters©The respected owners and actors and the lot
.-.©me

Truths about Carlos De Vil from "Return to the Isle of the Lost"

1. Is still plagued with nightmares about his mother.
2. In Evie’s words, Carlos is “obviously extremely uncomfortable with attention.”
3. Tries to clean up Hell Hall from habit even though Cruella isn’t there.
4. Enjoys working/studying in the dark.
5. Skips tourney practice to trace and hack an email.
6. Still damn good at manipulating technology.
7. Knows how to drive a car.
8. Jumps into crocodile infested water to save his friend.
9. Likes dancing.
10. Gets upset when his friends disappear without notice.
11. Middle name is not Danger, but Oscar.
12. Carlos says that he comes fourth in Cruella’s affections, after her furs, car, and wigs.
13. After suffering through Cruella’s abuse (and still dealing with the mental scars that she left behind), living in a closet, and having only technology as a friend, this is what Carlos has finally realized. In his words: “I’m better than you, Mother. No matter what you always told me.”

This is for Carlos, a really brave “villain” who had tons of character development but wasn’t highlighted well in the books. I see you, kid! I wish you had been appreciated more.

My name is René, many also know me as Residente and I am from Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico is a colony of the United States. We are the oldest colony in the world. For years, we have been used as an experimental island. From the medical experiments on our people to the chemical experiments on our land. From 1941-2003 on the island of Vieques, the United States Navy undertook a series of experiments with different chemical and biological weapons while using the island as a bombing range. To this day, the land and people of Vieques have not fully recovered from this devastation. There’s a Puerto Rican, a political prisoner, who has been incarcerated for over 34 years, longer than Nelson Mandela. His name: Oscar López Rivera, and he deserves to be free, today. More than 200,000 Puerto Ricans have served in the U.S. military. In our schools, children are taught more about U.S. history than the history of their own country. That is a colonial education. Without giving you exact numbers, I can tell you the U.S. gets more out of Puerto Rico economically than Puerto Rico receives from the U.S. We are currently living an unprecedented economic crisis and have the highest rates of poverty and unemployment of any other place in the U.S., yet the U.S. does not even allow us to restructure our debt. And this is the best one: People in Puerto Rico cannot vote for the President of the United States. In other words, we are not allowed to choose the person who makes crucial decisions regarding our country. I didn’t come here to complain, but rather put things in proper context. You may wonder, what I’m doing here? A person like me with all this information has come to the Bronx to support a candidate for the U.S. presidency. I will explain. I support Bernie Sanders because he has been the only candidate with logical proposals and has expressed support with my country’s debt relief. He did not come up to support us now, in the middle of an election cycle to win votes, but he spoke out from the moment the economic crisis began. I support Bernie Sanders because I think he is the most honest candidate there is. I support Bernie Sanders because he is the only candidate who furiously stands up and defends human rights and the rights of the LGBT community. I support Bernie Sanders because he has spoken out against those Latin American dictatorships financed by the United States which left more than half a million people dead or disappeared. He’s been opposed to a Pinochet in Chile, Ríos Montt in Guatemala, Videla in Argentina, just to name a few. I support Bernie Sanders because someone like Hillary Clinton does not deserve my vote. The thought of Hillary Clinton, who has dared to praise the likes of Henry Kissinger, the author of the most despicable Latin American genocide and the architect of Latin American dictatorship, responsible for all of those who disappeared in the 60’s, 70’s and 80’s, is enough for me not to vote for her. I’m not with her. It will represent an insult to consider yourself Latin American and vote for her. Not just an insult to oneself, but for the many victims that still suffer from this history. An insult to countless children who have lost their parents and grandparents. I support Bernie Sanders because I believe there are still good people like him in this country. And when Sanders wins the upcoming election, people will see the United States in a different light. It will no longer be a country that invades, that provokes wars, that quiets people. It will not be a country that tortures or believes in colonies instead. The United States will be a country that strives for unity, equality and peace. If Bernie Sanders were Puerto Rican , I’m certain who would fight with all his mind and all his heart as many Puerto Ricans have done, to bring freedom and self-determination to his country. I am here like all of you to support Bernie Sanders because we all support change in the world. Thank you. —René Pérez Joglar René Pérez Joglar (Full Speech) Bernie Sanders Rally South Bronx, New York 3.31.16 Full video: https://youtu.be/G4sAWtGYP1s?t=18m43s

Originally posted by thegirlwhoobsess