hip hop tours new york city

THIRTEEN’s The Talk – Race in America Tackles the Issue of Young People of Color and Their Uneasy Encounters With Law Enforcement. It premieres Monday, February 20, 9 p.m. on PBS. In anticipation of that premiere Tumblr and THIRTEEN  have convened officers, advocates and policy experts to discuss the state of community policing in the United States. 

Dr. Bryant T. Marks is a National Trainer on Implicit Bias and Community Policing. He has trained over 1,000 police chiefs via a series of White House briefings, and several thousand patrol officers through small group workshops in police departments across the country. He is a professor of psychology at Morehouse College and also serves as a Senior Research Fellow with the Campaign for Black Male Achievement.

John Matthews is the Executive Director of the Community Safety Institute (CSI) and a former Chief of Police. John developed and implemented community policing for the Dallas Police Department in the 1990’s and has worked nationally on scores of COPS Office initiatives over the past twenty years developing over 100 community policing training programs. John also serves as the Director of Federal Partnerships for the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund and was a member of the White House 21st Century Policing team.

Bakari Kitwana is the executive director of Rap Sessions, which is currently touring the nation leading town hall discussions on the theme “Run Toward Fear: Millennial Activists and Social Justice in the Trump Era” He is the author of The Hip-Hop Generation: Young Blacks and the Crisis in African-American Culture the forthcoming Hip-Hop Activism in the Obama Era.

Trevena Garel is a retired New York City Police Sergeant. During her 21-year career Trevena served as both an undercover and an investigator in the NYPD’s Chief of Patrol’s Investigation and Evaluation Section, investigating allegations of misconduct involving both uniformed and/or civilian members of the NYPD. Trevena has had “The Talk” with her three children and her two oldest grandchildren.

Chief Michael Koval began his career with the Madison Police Department in 1983. Before becoming the Chief in 2014 he was the Sergeant of Recruitment and Training for 17 years. He has a law degree from William Mitchell College of Law.

The Ask Box is now open.  Ask our panelists a question!

Our panelists will start responding on Saturday, February 18. 

Can He Live? The Charity Work of Shawn “JAY Z” Carter

Every few months the general public and media seem to debate Jay Z’s dedication to charity work. Personally Hov channels the great Jewish philosopher Maimonides, who constructed the “Eight Levels of Charity.” He believed the highest form of giving is anonymous-to-anonymous, which equates to a completely self-less offering. Hov in heavily invested in this idea and chooses to conduct his charity work privately and efficiently. But for those still wondering, here is a list of Shawn Carter’s charity work that has been made public:

Every year from 1997 to 2004 Jay-Z hosted the “Jay-Z Santa Claus Toy Drive,” where he travels back to the Marcy Projects on Christmas Day with his family to donate presents to the children living there. The Shawn Carter Scholarship Fund now assumes the role of handing out the gifts. Jay also provides for Thanksgiving turkey drives in his hometown borough of Bedford–Stuyvesant every year.

Jay-Z employs hundreds of people at his various companies, and he always endeavors to employ under-privileged young black women and men who are most in need of employment.

April 1999 - Jay-Z donated his proceeds from the Denver stop of the “Hard Knock Life Tour” to help the families of the victims of the Columbine tragedy: “We decided to donate the proceeds from this show as soon as we saw the date on the schedule. We’ve known first hand how pointless and senseless violence always is, and we wanted to show our support in a real way.”

July 2000 - Participated in a program teaching young consumers the reward of investing in the stock market. As part of the three-month program Jay donated $10,000 to his former high school, the George Westinghouse Career and Technical Education High School.

August 2000 – Hosted, commentated, and made a donation at a charity basketball game that benefited the Boys Harbor summer camp and T.H.A.N.K.U. (The Hillcrest Avenue Neighborhood Kids Union).

2001 – Jay-Z and Roc-A-Fella Records formed “Team Roc,” a charity organization affiliated with the New York Mission Society that created basketball leagues for at-risk youth.

September 2001 – As well as a $45,000 personal donation from Jay to each charity, Roc-A-Fella Records donated a portion of each “The Blueprint Lounge Tour” concert ticket sold to the American Red Cross, WQHT New York’s “Hip-Hop Has Heart Foundation” and the New York Fire Department, who were working to support survivors and the families of the victims of the 9/11 tragedy. There was also a specially designed Rocawear shirt sold during the tour and in-stores that benefited those organizations.

October 2001 - Performed at “The Concert for New York City,” a benefit concert for victims of the 9/11 tragedy. Hov also donated unique memorabilia that was later auctioned off to support the Robin Hood Foundation.

November 2001 –Hosted and performed at the “Jay-Z’s Thanksgiving Give Back Concerts” in New York. Proceeds went to the “Team Roc” organization.

March 2002 - Headlined and donated to the “Urban Aid 2″ benefit concert in support of Russell Simmons’ charity that raises funds awareness for HIV prevention initiatives.

December 2002 – Jay-Z surprised a group of youth who were a part of the New York Knicks reading program for inner-city kids. He joined them in class for the day and read to them.

2003 - Formed the Shawn Carter Scholarship Foundation with his mother Gloria Carter. They founded the charity on the belief that any motivated individual in need should have the opportunity to further his or her education. Since its formation the Foundation has donated over $10 million to more than 750 students who would have otherwise not been able to afford a college education.

2003 - Since the first branch opened in 2003, each The 40/40 Club has ensured that a percentage of profits is given to music and sport charities in deprived communities. The club also gives first option on jobs to unemployed young people.

April 2003 - Was honored by The Foundation for Ethnic Understanding for his work in improving Black–Jewish relations.

October 2003 - Jay’s partnership with the Heineken Music Initiative had the Dutch brewers donation portions of their Red Star Sounds Present Def Jamaica dancehall project to the Shawn Carter Scholarship Foundation.

November 2003 - All proceeds from his legendary “Fade to Black” concert went to various charities, including the Shawn Carter Scholarship Foundation and the Hip-Hop Summit Action Network. During the show he donated $25,000 to the mothers of Biggie and Tupac to be used for their charitable efforts.

May 2004 – Jay-Z hosted a charity luncheon for the Golden Gloves Foundation, and along with “Team Roc” he formed a scholarship program for underprivileged youth who have boxing potential.

July 2004 – Enlisted Beyoncé, Tyra Banks, Queen Latifah, Kanye West, and more to design a pair of Reebok “S. Carter II” shoes to be auctioned off. All proceeds went to the Shawn Carter Scholarship Foundation and Jay matched the donations.

September 2005 - He donated $1 million to the American Red Cross’ relief effort after the devastating Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans. Hov also put in personal calls to his famous friends to encourage them to donate, and appeared on the BET telethon for Hurricane Katrina to appeal to the general public.

2006 - Sent more than $2,500 worth of designer street wear to the Campaign for Adolescent and University Student Empowerment, a foundation that supports the low-income area of Spring Hill in DeLand, Orlando.

2006 - Funded and co-produced the documentary film Black Sorority Project: The Exodus. The film told the story of 22 female students at Howard University who defied barriers of race and gender to join the women’s suffrage movement and form a new sorority, Delta Sigma Theta, which is still known as one of the nation’s most formidable women’s organizations.

August 2006 - Met with United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan at the organization’s headquarters in New York. He joined forces with the United Nations and together they planned to help fight the global water crisis. He set out on his “Water for Life Tour,” travelling all over the world filming the documentary “Diary of Jay-Z: Water for Life.” He installed pumps and water sewage solutions in impoverished villages all over Africa.

August 2006 – Jay-Z personally-pledged $400,000 to PlayPump International for the installation of water pumps in malnourished villages in Africa.

November 2006 – Performed a concert in New York city for his “Water for Life” program with the UN. The concert raised almost $300,000 for PlayPump International.

November 2006 - Appeared alongside Russell Simmons in a public service announcement for the Foundation for Ethnic Understanding, condemning anti-semitism and all other forms of racism.

November 2006 – Hosted and played in a charity poker game. $403,862 in proceeds went to the Shawn Carter Scholarship Foundation and AROD Family Foundation.

May 2008 - Established an educational trust for the two children of Sean Bell, the unarmed man shot and killed by the police in November 2006 on the day he was to be married. Jay-Z also made sure Bell’s fiancée, Nicole Paultre Bell, was taken care of, and hired her to appear in Rocawear’s ‘I Will Not Lose’ advertising campaign.

June 2008 - Designed a pair of wellington Hunter Boots during his time at the “Glastonbury Music Festival” to be sold at auction. Proceeds from the auction went to WaterAid to raise much need funds for their work in Madagascar improving access to safe water, hygiene and sanitation

June 2008 – Donated to the Robin Hood Foundation’s annual fundraising drive. The foundation’s proceeds support 240 poverty-fighting programs in New York City.

August 2008 - Performed at the “Africa Rising Music Festival” to raised money for Africa Rising, an organization established in 2006 to reflect the culture and positive attributes of Africa’s social, political, and economic progress.

December 2008 - Designed an “I/denti/tee” shirt in collaboration with Bono for Bono’s charity EDUN LIVE, which works to improve the skills of their clothing workers and aims to foster trade in Africa by ensuring all of its products are 100% African, from “grower to sewer.”

February 2009 – Formed the charity Two Kings with LeBron James. They donated over 150 musical instruments to the Mesa Arts Academy in Mesa, Arizona.

April 2009 - Jay-Z donated $25,000 to the Mary J. Blige and Steve Stoute Foundation for the Advancement of Women Now.

September 2009 – Organized the benefit concert “Answer the Call,” which benefited the New York Police & Fire Widows’ and Children’s Benefit Fund. The concert raised $750,000.

January 2010 – Recorded “Stranded (Haiti Mon Amour)” with Bono, Rihanna, and The Edge. They performed the song during the Hope foe Haiti Now live charity telethon. Proceeds from the sale of the song supported rebuilding in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake.

February 2010 – Donated a signed Gibson guitar to a charity auction for the Artists for Peace and Justice Foundation.

February 2010 – Jay-Z and LeBron James’ Two Kings charity conducted a counseling and inspiration session for the Boys & Girls Club of Greater Dallas in Texas.

September 2010 - Performed at the Keep a Child Alive organization’s “Black Ball” to raise awareness and urgently needed funds to help children and families affected by HIV in Africa and India.

May 2010 – Donated and signed his 35-piece limited edition Audemars Piguet “Royal Oak Offshore Las Vegas Strip Tourbillon” timepiece to the watchmakers “Time to Give” charity auction. The auction benefited the Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS organization, and Hov’s AP piece sold for $220,000. The event raised a total of $816,000 in proceeds.

August 2010 – Partnered with Nike to create five pairs of exclusive “All Black Everything” Air Force Ones, which were auctioned off to benefit the Shawn Carter Scholarship Foundation.

November 2010 – Donated and signed bottles of Armand de Brignac to be auctioned to benefit The Compound Foundation, which provides funds and equipment to build recording studios inside local group home centers.

New Years Eve 2010 – Auctioned VIP tickets to his and Coldplay’s headlining show at The Cosmopolitan Hotel in Las Vegas to benefit The Grammy Foundation.

February 2011 – Jay Z and LeBron James’ charity Two Kings provided funds to renovate over 100 public parks and gyms across America. 

March 2011 – Raised $42,000 for the Stephen Gaynor School, a non-profit school for students with learning differences, by auctioning the chance to sit courtside with him at two New Jersey Nets vs. New York Knicks games.

June 2011 – Donated to auction a coveted internship at Roc Nation, with proceeds benefiting the Mary J. Blige and Steve Stoute Foundation for the Advancement of Women Now.

September 2011 - Hosted a carnival-themed fundraiser at Pier 54 in New York for the Shawn Carter Scholarship Foundation. The event raised over $1 million in proceeds.

October 2011 - Lent his voice talents to the premiere episode of Warren Buffet’s animated children’s series Secret Millionaires Club. The show empowers kids by helping them understand the world they live in, teaching them about the impact their decisions have on their own lives and encouraging them to have the confidence to be the best they can be.

January 2012 – Jay Z and Beyoncé donated a large portion of the gifts given to them upon the birth of Blue Ivy Carter to charities that could pass them on to those less fortunate.

February 2012 - Jay performed two charity concerts at Carnegie Hall to benefit the United Way of New York City organization and the Shawn Carter Scholarship Foundation.

February 2012 – Jay donated $25,000 to the Whitney Houston Memorial Foundation in the wake of her untimely death.

March 2012 - Donated the Maybach 57 used in his and Kanye West’s “Otis” video to auction, where proceeds went to Save the Children’s relief efforts for the East Africa Drought Disaster of 2011.

September 2012 – Executive-produced and funded the release of Shola Lynch’s independent documentary Free Angela & All Political Prisoners.

October 2012 - Jay auctioned ten limited-edition signed Brooklyn Nets “Carter #4″ jerseys on eBay. Over $15,000 worth of proceeds went to the Shawn Carter Scholarship Foundation.

September 2012 – Proceeds from Jay’s “Made in America” festival went to the United Way of Greater Philadelphia and Southern New Jersey organization.

November 2012 – Donated to the Hurricane Sandy relief effort. He also purchased and donated generators to New York residents after they lost power during the hurricane.

July 2013 - Donated a large sum of money to the Marina Abramović Institute. In 2015 she would publicly accuse him of not making the donation to her art foundation, but later had to apologize as records show he had indeed donated.

September 2013 – Donated to the Made in Africa Foundation and helped launch the Africa50 campaign, which aims to lift 200 million Africans out of poverty.

October 2013 – Jay releases a holiday collection with New York department store Barneys. After racial profiling issues arose within the store Jay ensured that 100% of the profits would be donated to his Shawn Carter Scholarship Foundation. Proceeds topped $1 million.

2014 - Donated to and supported charities who demand and fight for justice for those discriminated against in the trans-community.

January 2014 - Performed at the invitation-only “DirecTV Superbowl Super Saturday” event, with proceeds benefiting the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation.

June 2014 – Jay Z and Beyoncé’s “On The Run Tour” donated $1 from every ticket purchased to the Shawn Carter Scholarship Foundation. A portion of the proceeds from each “Chase Lounge VIP Ticket Package” was also donated to the Shawn Carter Scholarship Foundation.

August 2014 – Donated tens of thousands of dollars to pay the bail charges for hundreds of protesters who were arrested during the Ferguson protests held after a police officer killed Michael Brown.

August 2014 – Curated the line-up and performers for the Roc Nation “Summer Classic Charity Basketball Tournament” charity basketball game. The $1,040,000 in proceeds benefited the RC22 Foundation and the PitCCh-In Foundation.

September 2014 – Jay performed as the headliner for the Global Citizen Festival and made a substantial donation to the cause. The Global Citizen project aims to end extreme global poverty, as well as focusing on solving epidemics like Ebola, ending the HIV/AIDS crisis, and providing clean water.

December 2014 – Jay-Z paid for and hand-delivered “I CAN’T BREATHE” shirts to the Brooklyn Nets locker room to promote the ‘Black Lives Matter’ movement on a national scale.

December 2014 - Met with the Governor of New York State Andrew Cuomo about doing a top to bottom review of the Criminal Justice system. Jay pushed them to discuss how everyone can work together to pass a reform package that ensures equality in the eyes of the law.

December/January 2015 - Jay and Beyoncé paid for over 2,000 American troops stationed in Kuwait and Afghanistan to have the opportunity to watch their “On the Run Tour” film on New Year’s Eve. They filmed spots for the beginning of the screenings, speaking of their gratitude for our nation’s troops and military families.

April 2015 - Donated tens of thousands of dollars to pay the bail charges for hundreds of protesters who were arrested during the Baltimore protests after the death of Freddie Gray.

May 2015 – Donated to the Baltimore Justice Fund. TiDAL live-streamed Prince’s “Rally 4 Peace” concert, and the streaming service matched the donations made by the general public during the stream.

May 2015 - Visited Baltimore on Mother’s Day to attend Prince’s “Rally 4 Peace” concert, and backstage he met with Freddie Gray’s family in a visit closed to the press. Hov and Beyoncé donated a large sum of money to the family to help them continue their journey for justice.

May 2015 – Jay’s longtime friend and collaborator dream hampton reveals that he has donated hundreds of thousands of dollars to the “Black Lives Matter” campaign, helping to establish new chapters of the movement all over the country.

June 2015 - Supported Roc Nation Sports athlete Robinson Cano at his annual charity event “Canoche” in Seattle. Hov donated a signed bottle of Armand de Brignac, which sold at auction for $5,500. He also made a private contribution to Cano’s charity fund.

August 2015 - Jay Z signed and wrote lyrics on two used skateboards, donated by professional riders Paul Rodriguez and Shane O’Neil, for the Tony Hawk Foundation’s “Boards + Bands” fundraising initiative.

September 2015 - As with every “Made in America” festival, Hov provides space free of charge to charity organizations in an area called the “Cause Village.”

October 2015 - Organised the TiDAL X: 10/20 charity concert. Enlisted his talented friends to donate their time and efforts and held a concert where 100% of the proceeds were matched by TiDAL and donated to charity. The event raised $1,500,000, which was donated to the New World Foundation and Harry Belafonte’s Sankofa non-profit group. They in turn gave the proceeds to organizations dealing with income and racial inequality, childhood education, and strengthening relationships between local communities and law enforcement.

November 2015 - Donated $100,000 to Los Angeles’ White Memorial Medical Center’s cancer unit.

February 2016 - Attended the annual “amfAR Gala,” one of the most successful and high-profile AIDS benefit events. Entrance started at $5,000 per person, and went up to $80,000 for a table.

March/April 2016 - Aligned the Shawn Carter Scholarship Foundation with Ticketmaster, with a percentage of each ticket sold by the company during a five-week period going directly to underprivileged scholarship students. “By removing financial obstacles to higher education, a student can move from public housing to public office, from bus pass to passport, and from unemployment to undeniable.”

June 2016 - Roc Nation partnered with Brooklyn-founded STATE Bags to donate over 30,000 fully-stocked backpacks to communities involved with President Obama’s “My Brother’s Keeper” initiative. The bags reached children across thirty cities nationwide, with six cities receiving a mentor programme from a Roc Nation artist or athlete. Nearly 20% of school age children in the United States are living in poverty, with 6.5 million students missing a month or more of school each year.

July 2016 - Curated the line-up and performers for the second Roc Nation “Summer Classic Charity Basketball Tournament” in Brooklyn. All the proceeds from the event went to four different benefits including the PitCCh In Foundation, the RC22 Foundation, Fundacion El Angel de Miguel Cotto and Beyond Type 1.

September 2016 - Jay Z lent his writing talents and voice to the Molly Crabapple-drawn “The War on Drugs is an Epic Fail” short film. His friend dream hampton had approached the Drug Policy Alliance about collaborating with Revolve Impact, the social impact agency she works with. Hov soon came on board with the project to encourage everyone to stand on the right side of history.

September 2016 - As with every “Made in America” festival, Hov provides space free of charge to charity organizations in an area called the “Cause Village.”

November 2016 - Jay Z headlines the inaugural Global Citizen India festival in Mumbai, India. He made a substantial donation to the cause, as well as his time. The Global Citizen project aims to end extreme global poverty, as well as focusing on solving epidemics like Ebola, ending the HIV/AIDS crisis, and providing clean water to all.

March 2017 saw the premiere of the prison reform documentary series TIME: The Kalief Browder Story, of which Jay served as an executive producer. He participated in a discussion at the Sundance Film Festival and a town hall event in New York. Upcoming productions Hov has in the pipeline include a series on the lives of Emmett Till and Trayvon Martin, as well as an inequality-focused series with National Geographic channel titled RACE.

May 2017 - Jay’s Shawn Carter Scholarship Foundation partnered with eBay on a ten-day charity auction, where the belongings of celebrities and unique Roc Nation and TIDAL experiences were auctioned off. 100% of the proceeds went to the foundation’s educational programs and scholarship fund.

June 2017 - Hov wrote an op-ed for TIME magazine on the injustices facing people of color who are trapped within the corrupt bail system. In the piece he revealed he made donations to the Southerners on New Ground and Color of Change organizations to ensure 100 fathers would be bailed out for Father’s Day.

June 2017 - Jay wrote a guest column for the Hollywood Reporter to push for projects that demand social justice.“The power of one voice is strong, but when it comes to social justice, the power of our collective voices is unstoppable. Now is the time to recognize that through our voices we really can effect change. But social justice isn’t a political issue. It’s a human issue. It’s a story of empathy. When we are able to identify that we are all not perfect and have compassion for someone else, we can move forward as a society.”

September 2017 -  As with every “Made in America” festival, Hov provides space free of charge to charity organizations in an area called the “Cause Village.” Hov also signed a “Made in America” freedom camo jacket, which was auctioned off through CharityBuzz to support the One America Appeal’s hurricane relief efforts.

September 2017 -  JAY-Z purchased a table at Rihanna’s “Diamond Ball” for his Roc Nation family, at a reported cost of $150,000. The event was held in support of the Roc Nation singer’s non-profit Clara Lionel Foundation, which benefits impoverished communities across the globe by supplying healthcare and education programs. In support of his little sister Jay donated and signed a $35,000 “Nebuchadnezzar” bottle of his Armand de Brignac Rosé champagne. It is one of the most rare bottle formats in the world, with its 15 liter contents equivalent to 20 standard bottles. The champagne sold for $75,000 during the live auction. During the benefit Hov also signed pairs of Rih’s Puma x FENTY “Creeper” sneakers to be auctioned off.

October 2017 - JAY-Z’s TIDAL streaming service will hold their third annual benefit concert on the 17th. 100% of the ticket sales and donations through the donation page on the TIDAL website will be donated to natural disaster relief efforts in Puerto Rico, Mexico, Houston and the Caribbean.

October 2017 - TIDAL and Roc Nation, in conjunction with New York State, are helping Fat Joe with relief efforts in his home nation by chartering multiple planes to deliver supplies to the disaster-stricken Puerto Rico. They had hoped to collect 200,000 pounds in donations, but amazingly ended up with two million pounds. 

Lin-Manuel Miranda (born January 16, 1980) is an American composer, rapper, lyricist, and actor. He wrote the Broadway musical In the Heights. It opened on Broadway at the Richard Rodgers Theatre in 2008, and Miranda starred in it as Usnavi; he also won the Tony Award as composer and lyricist for it.

Miranda was born in northern Manhattan, New York City, New York. He grew up in the Inwood section of Manhattan and is of Puerto Rican descent.

After graduating from Hunter College High School, Miranda went on to attend Wesleyan University and graduated in 2002. During this time, he co-founded a hip hop comedy troupe called Freestyle Love Supreme. He wrote the earliest draft of In the Heights in 1999, his sophomore year of college. After the show was accepted by Second Stage, Wesleyan’s student theater company, Miranda worked on adding “freestyle rap … bodegas, and salsa numbers." It played from  April 20th to April 22nd.

Miranda wrote and directed several other musicals at Wesleyan. He also acted in many other productions, ranging from musicals to Shakespeare.

In 2002, Miranda and Mailer worked with director Tommy Kail and wrote five separate drafts of In the Heights that were dissected. During this time, Miranda worked as an English teacher at his former high school. After making it off-Broadway, the play went to Broadway in 2008. Miranda made his last performance in the Broadway show on February 15, 2009.

However, Miranda reprised his role of Usnavi when the national tour of In the Heights played in Los Angeles, California from June 23 to July 25, 2010. The tour continued without him at the helm until it played in San Juan, Puerto Rico, where he played Usnavi.

The Broadway production played its final performance on January 9, 2011 after 29 previews and 1,185 regular performances. Miranda reprised the role of Usnavi from December 25, 2010 until the closing of the production.

Miranda wrote, directed, and acted in an independent film called Clayton’s Friends (1996). In 2007, Miranda made an appearance on the television series The Sopranos in the episode "Remember When.” Miranda also worked as an English teacher at his former high school, wrote for the Manhattan Times as a columnist and restaurant reviewer, and composed music for commercials. In 2008, Miranda was invited by composer-lyricist Stephen Schwartz to contribute two new songs to a revised version of Schwartz and Nina Faso’s 1978 musical Working, which opened in May 2008 at the Asolo Repertory Theatre in Sarasota, Florida.

Miranda wrote Spanish language dialogue and worked with Stephen Sondheim to translate into Spanish song lyrics for the revival of West Side Story, which opened on Broadway in March 2009. He is also a composer and actor on the 2009 revival of The Electric Company. Miranda also appeared in the CollegeHumor sketch “Hardly Working: Rap Battle,” playing himself working as an intern and rapper. In September 2009, Miranda played Alvie, Gregory House’s roommate in a psychiatric hospital, in the two-hour season six premiere episode of House. He reprised the role in May 2010. He also has done work for Sesame Street, where he has played occasional roles and sings the theme song to Murray Has a Little Lamb.

He is a member of Freestyle Love Supreme, a performance group of freestylers that make up words on the spot. Chris Jackson, a member of the original Broadway cast of In the Heights, is also a member.

Miranda and the cast of In the Heights performed segments from the show at the Lincoln Center Barnes and Noble. They also performed at the Virgin Megastore. Recently a flash mob performance done by Flash Mob America showing a large scale street version of 96,000 being performed as Miranda ate lunch. Miranda has made several popular YouTube videos centered on In the Heights, performing songs like “Bet on It” from High School Musical 2 and “Run This Town” with lyrics altered to concern the show.

He is working on The Hamilton Mixtape, a hip hop album based upon the life of Alexander Hamilton. He performed part of it at the White House Evening of Poetry, Music, and the Spoken Word on May 12, 2009, accompanied by Alex Lacamoire.

He also co-wrote the music and lyrics for Bring It On: The Musical, with Tom Kitt and Amanda Green. The musical opened on October 30, 2011 at the Ahmanson Theatre, Los Angeles, California at the start of a US National tour.

He appeared as Charley in an Encores! staged concert of Merrily We Roll Along at the New York City Center which ran from February 8, 2012 to February 19. In 2012, Miranda appeared in a small role in The Odd Life of Timothy Green as Reggie.

In September 2012, Miranda was cast in a recurring role on the 2013 NBC drama Do No Harm.

In November 2013, Miranda appeared in the episode Bedtime Stories (Season 9, Episode 11) on the CBS sitcom How I Met Your Mother.

Miranda married Vanessa Nadal, a high school friend who grew up with him in Washington Heights, in September 2010, after dating her for five years.

The principal female character in In the Heights, Vanessa, is not based on Nadal, as many people believe. At the wedding reception, Miranda, along with the wedding party, presented Vanessa with a group rendition of the Fiddler on the Roof song “To Life”. The video was posted on YouTube and quickly became popular on the internet.

Miranda received an honorary degree from Yeshiva University during its May 14, 2009 graduation ceremony. He is the youngest person to receive an honorary degree from Yeshiva University. His show In the Heights is based in the upper Manhattan community of Washington Heights, which is also home to Yeshiva’s campus. Ed Koch, former mayor of New York City, presented Miranda with the degree and remarked about first meeting him when Miranda was seven years old.

Double Dutch’s Forgotten Hip-Hop Origins

In November of 1982, the New York City Rap Tour came to Paris, bringing with it a culture that had never been seen in Europe— hip-hop. The group of young and black New Yorkers wore a variety of leathers, sneakers, jumpsuits, puffer coats, caps, and hoodies. And, according to a write-up by David Hershkovits for Sunday News Magazine, they “blindsided the Europeans [in the audience] with their burst of personality and freedom of creation.”

Afrika Bambaataa DJed. The Infinity Rappers rhymed next to him. Futura 2000 and Fab Five Freddy sprayed canvases and walls surrounding the performance space. And in the middle of the dance floor, right before the Rock Steady Crew came out to breakdance, the Fantastic Four jumped rope, or more specifically double dutched.

The names of those DJs, rappers, and graffiti writers who performed that fateful day have become fixtures in hip-hop lore. The Fantastic Four are less well known, but at the time, the double dutch girls who defined the earliest incarnation of hip-hop.

Continue

Rosa Alicia Clemente (born April 18, 1972) is a United States community organizer, independent journalist and hip-hop activist. She was the vice presidential running mate of 2008 Green Party Presidential candidate Cynthia McKinney in the 2008 U.S. Presidential election.[1][2][3]

Clemente was born and raised in South Bronx, New York. She is a graduate of the University of Albany and Cornell University.

Clemente’s academic work has focused on research of national liberation struggles within the United States, with a specific focus on the Young Lords Party and the Black Liberation Army. While a student at SUNY Albany, she was President of the Albany State University Black Alliance (ASUBA) and Director of Multicultural Affairs for the Student Association. At Cornell she was a founding member of La Voz Boriken, a social/political organization dedicated to supporting Puerto Rican political prisoners and the independence of Puerto Rico.

Clemente has written for Clamor Magazine, The Ave. magazine, The Black World Today, The Final Call and numerous websites.[4] She has been the subject of articles[5] in the Village Voice, The New York Times, Urban Latino and The Source magazines. She has appeared on CNN, MSNBC, C-SPAN, Democracy Now! and Street Soldiers.[6][7] In 2001, she was a youth representative at the United Nations World Conference against Xenophobia, Racism and Related Intolerance in South Africa and in 2002 was named[citation needed] by Red Eye Magazine as one of the top 50 Hip Hop Activists to look out for.

In 1995, she developed Know Thy Self Productions (KTSP), a full-service speakers bureau, production company and media consulting service. Seeing a need for young people of color to be heard and taken seriously, she began presenting workshops and lectures at colleges, universities, high schools, and prisons. Since 1995, Clemente has presented at over 200 colleges, conferences and community centers on topics such as “African-American and Latino/a Intercultural Relations”, “Hip-Hop Activism”, “The History of the Young Lords Party”, and “Women, Feminism and Hip Hop”. KTSP now includes an expanded college speakers bureau which has produced three major Hip Hop activism tours, “Dare to Struggle, Dare to Win” with M1 of dead prez and Fred Hampton Jr.; “The ACLU College Freedom Tour” with dead prez, DJ Kuttin Kandi, Mystic and comedian Dave Chappelle; and the “Speak Truth to Power” Tour a collaborative tour of award winning youth activists.

More Information on Rosa Clemente

youtube

Keep It Kool: The Kool Keith Story (2014) 32min.

From the early days of Hip Hop in his native Bronx, to his pioneering work with Ultramagnetic MCs, to re- defining underground Hip Hop with his Dr. Octagon album, hip hop’s most illusive Icon tells his life story. Filmed in the Bronx and Delaware (complete with rare performance footage, and new music) Keep It Kool: The Kool Keith story, is a unique view into the mind of hip hop’s original mad genius. Kool Keith along with his group Ultramagnetic MCs, changed Hip Hop production forever with their pioneering style of meshing samples together. From his influence on KRS-One, up through his cult classic work with Dan The Automator, Kool Keith has managed to stay relevant on a global scale by being 100% unique. Finally, fans and hip hop historians alike can hear his life story from the tours with The Red Hot Chili Peppers and Green Day, back to his humble beginnings in the New York City housing projects. Directed by hip hop artist, producer and film maker Marcus “Marchitect” Watkins, Keep It Kool: The Kool Keith story is a must see for any music lover.

Jay-Z, DJ Clue?, Redman, DMX and Method Man pose during a photo session after announcing their 40-city Hard Knock Life Tour in New York on January 26, 1999.

The tour was the first multi-group hip-hop tour in almost a decade, featuring many of hip hop’s biggest names. When announced many mainstream media outlets theorized that the tour would be cancelled; with some saying heated competition between rap acts would erupt in backstage violence, and gang violence would be perpetrated in the crowd.

”People were saying someone’s going to die on that tour,” Damon Dash recalled in an interview with Entertainment Weekly in May 1999, but after 11 weeks on the road, playing in sold-out arenas from Canada to Texas, ”there was no violence and no fights.” Declaring it the ”most successful hip-hop tour ever,” Dash unabashedly went on to say, ”we set a precedent not just for rap tours, but for all music tours.”

The Hard Knock Life Tour sold out 52 arenas, earned $18 million and suffered no cancellations, no artist drop-offs, or any incidents of violence. The rappers took a further stand against violence by dedicating their personal earnings from their Colorado concert to the victims of the Columbine High School shooting. The tour was chronicled in the September 2000 documentary film Backstage, featuring live performances by the tour’s roster and an in-depth look at the events backstage. The film grossed $496,226 at the box office during its limited-release opening weekend. Presented by DJ Clue?, the majority of the soundtrack, Backstage: A Hard Knock Life, was recorded on tour buses while the acts traveled around North America. The album was certified Gold three months after its release.

J. Cole: Portrait of a Rap Superhero

In J. Cole’s early days, he used a lot of basketball metaphors to describe how he broke into the rap game. The Come Up. The Warm Up. Friday Night Lights. The Sideline Story. When Cole announced the third installment of his Dollar and a Dream Tour — the title of which stems from a song about chasing a better future throughout the struggle — you could almost feel the energy of his fans through their Twitter and Instagram accounts. Like previous editions, the tour was impromptu — where things like a random flyer to fans are currency for a coveted wristband. Oh yes, and a dollar must be paid as well. This time around, the news swept like wildfire, despite once again arriving at a moment’s notice. Keeping his tradition of playing back old material in full, the 30-year-old rapper revisited Friday Night Lights, nearing its five-year anniversary on November 12. However, all superstardom aside, not a lot has changed. Nearly five years later, the 25-year-old Cole versus the 30-year-old Cole of today is practically the same. Both are extremely appreciative of their fans and have produced top-notch projects in a climate where rappers are constantly proving their worth. Both also wanted to create a moment to remember — Friday Night Lights was an OG surprise release, while 2014 Forest Hills Drive sold 354,000 copies in its first week and debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard 200. Cole is nearly done with his Dollar and a Dream Tour. He’s hit Dallas, New York City and Atlanta already. His last stop is tomorrow in Los Angeles. Each stop was pandemonium. Once again, if you don’t know the logistics behind getting in, here they are: he announces the location, time and day of the show, it costs $1 to get in, and it’s a first come, first serve for a chance to see the favorite rapper. To keep it real, this whole idea is brilliant. In today’s hip hop climate, it’s rare that someone is so invested in pleasing their fanbase — specifically, day one fans who have been there throughout your whole career. It’s that same fan who can rap every word to “Villlematic” and not lose their breath. The fan who buys “Dollar and a Dream” gear and rocks it throughout the whole concert. The fan who sticks around after it’s over to get an autograph. The fan who can watch their favorite rapper rock a stage in a sold-out venue, yet also march for injustice. That’s a balance few have struck; a balance few care to. The point is that Cole is the quintessential rapper of 2015. And it’s not just the quality of music or his dedication to his fans; it’s the efforts outside of music that also make him so great and vital to the current rap landscape. It’s a time where it truly is bigger than hip hop. I attended J. Cole’s show at Irving Plaza strictly as a fan. During my college years, I played Friday Night Lights a lot among my rotation of Curren$y’s This Ain’t No Mixtape and Drake’s So Far Gone. My inner stan was jumping inside at the thought of hearing my favorites like “Higher,” “Premeditated Murder” and “The Autograph.” After his Dreamville boys (Omen, Cozz and Bas) warmed up the excited crowd, the chants for J. Cole were deafening. Inside an intimate venue like Irving — where fans packed the bottom floor and huddled up against the balconies upstairs — the atmosphere was different from any regular shows there. This was for us, the fans, and he was well aware of that. “Close to five years ago…we dropped this bomb on the world called Friday Night Lights,” he would say later that night. “We came to do this s**t tonight. I really wanna know who know this word for word.” Everyone did, because the thing about Cole is that he’s always giving back, so we return with his lyrics in gratitude. From his earliest days as a native of small town Fayetteville (Cole’s humble beginnings) to laying the foundation for his Dreamville brand in NYC to finally landing that Roc Nation deal and getting a Jay Z co-sign, Cole’s is a narrative we can all relate to. His past isn’t littered with stories of struggling in the streets, but rather a passion to create a better life and spread his Nas-inspired raps to the world. As his voice gets louder, we continue to value his messages, no matter how big or small the gesture is. Just in the past year alone, Cole has visited the protests in Ferguson over the death of Michael Brown and performed his moving tribute “Be Free” on Late Night With David Letterman. His childhood home, which is also the title of his latest album 2014 Forest Hills Drive, houses single mothers rent-free. “My goal is to have that be a haven for families,” he said in an interview with Combat Jack. “Every two years a new family will come in, they live rent-free.” If that wasn’t enough, during his promotional run of 2014 Forest Hills Drive, he hosted private listenings at his home to give fans a personal experience because he really wanted to connect with them. Some even received one-on-one time, where Cole went to their home and hung out. He keeps his promises, too, recently attending a fan’s high school graduation after becoming inspired by her open letter about academic hardships. All he asked was for her to get into a four-year university. She delivered and he came through with the most life-changing gift ever. The thing about Cole is that his basketball metaphors meant something more than a cool merger of rap and sports. He’s like a Russell Westbrook or a Chris Paul — an MVP who gets nothing but love from his community and is constantly reciprocating that support. And all it took was a dollar and a dream. We hope 10 years from now Cole is still rapping and still giving back to the people who made him who he is today.

Source: bet.com