hip hop influence

  • Person: So what genre is Blurryface?
  • Me: wellll…
  • Me: *thinks about Ride*
  • Me: Jamaican alternative
  • Me: *thinks about Doubt*
  • Me: but it's also R&B with hints of electronica
  • Me: *thinks about Polarize*
  • Me: but it could also be pop with a slight hip hop influence
  • Me: *thinks about Lane Boy*
  • Me: but ya know Jamaican dance definitely could fit
  • Me: *thinks about heavydirtysoul*
  • Me: but alternative with a influence of early 90's rap might work
  • Me: *thinks about We Don't Believe What's On TV*
  • Me: no it's definitely dark pop punk
  • Me: *thinks about stressed out*
  • Me: but it could definitely be hip hop
  • Me: *thinks about The Judge*
  • Me: eh dark pop works
  • Me: *thinks about-* Hey where are you going
  • Person: *running far away from me*
  • Me: Wait come back we still have six more songs left before we can even start to define a genre. And what are your blurryface theories?
Review: BTS “Spring Day” and “Not Today”

2016 brought kpop group BTS from the ranks of upcoming stars into an upper tier of recognition through record-breaking album sales and YouTube views. The re-release of their breakthrough album Wings titled, You Never Walk Alone marks a pivotal, yet sensitive venture into 2017. With the new year upon them, BTS’s latest release establishes a foundation for the direction the group will take moving forward. Interestingly enough, and with little warning, BTS’s first move of the new year was a double release, first with the ballad-esque “Spring Day” and a week later, the hip-hop influenced “Not Today.”

The initial release of “Spring Day” had me uncertain. It followed the similar script of what the group has been promoting since their 2015 album release The Most Beautiful Moment in Life. What drew new fans in from previous releases seemed to be the same aspects that drove older fans away. The repetition of thematic storylines with an emphasis on acting over musical performances, while cohesive, seemed to drag on as years passed. Powerful live performances were put on the back-burner in favor of retellings of similar “Lost Boys” style narratives derived from popular culture, arts, and literature. While the imagery used to portray both friendship and isolation, boundless energy and enduring sadness aligned with the group’s personal image while relating to their audience, it came time when the relatability simply became predictability.

“Spring Day” follows the group’s preluded patterns. Based on the philosophical short-fiction, “The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas” written by Ursula K. Le Guin, BTS once again revisits the perils and high-points of youth. This isn’t a bad thing, necessarily. There is immense value in both the work itself as it stands alone, as well as another addition the repertoire of BTS’s collection as artists. In an industry where visuals are key and many contemporaries in the kpop field release their own solid work without the thematic elements and continuity inspired by literature, BTS once again proves that they go the extra mile conceptually. The release unites fans into busting out their close-reading reading skills and into studying philosophical and ethical values together. It encourages viewers to watch closely, to research, value and understand the imagery that is used, which transcends its value from purely entertainment to an interactive experience. However, it’s simply to say that BTS has done this before, and whether this borders upon repetition, or thoughtful cohesion, is up to the fans.

“Spring Day” also leaves much desired musically. As a song with a softer tempo and style, BTS has shone brighter before in tracks such as “Let Me Know” (2014) and “Butterfly” (2015). The line distribution is weighted terribly, as multi-faceted members of the group like J-Hope go without much vocal weight within the music. The song’s strongest points musically lie in its background and gang vocals where the softly crooned lyrics as a collective group reflect the picturesque moments of the music video, making the song feel more like a soundtrack than a single. Altogether, this was a decent release, especially for a re-release, but for a group of BTS’s influence and attention, decent isn’t good enough.

And then “Not Today” was dropped. “Not Today” takes BTS into 2017, while also taking listeners back to the humble beginnings of their 2013 debut. The song can appeal to nostalgic BTS fans with its unmistakable, energy-fueled sound (yes, it’s been long enough for nostalgia). What stands out the most after several listens is the vocals displayed by rapper-line Rap Monster, Suga, and J-Hope. Their delivery is derived from the roots of what makes each of them a distinctive voice in the scene, so that as audio over video, their voices are not only identifiable, but prevailing.

The release borrows a combination of elements which have allowed their previous works to succeed. Aesthetically, the music video embraces what has taken them from stars to stardom in, “Blood Sweat & Tears” (2016). The aforementioned release freed BTS from their respectable, yet compartmentalized works, be it with hard-hitting hip-hop tracks or angst-ridden, warbled singles. It combined original sound and stunning visuals with the symbolic works featured for deeper meaning rather than merely for aesthetic value. “Not Today” finds itself incorporating beautiful color schemes and parallels between BTS and their droves of backup dancers, and also with the nature in the scenery, which altogether creates subtle symbolic meaning that doubles as something that is pleasing to the eye.

Musically, “Not Today” is broken down into distinctive, rap-focused verses that are reminiscence of earlier releases like “Danger” (2014) or even “We Are Bulletproof Pt. 2” (2013).  The distinguishing choreography and impressive footwork, like “Dope” (2015) before it, it is what reminds viewers just why BTS are considered right along groups like more seasoned boy groups in the scene like SHINee, Infinite, and Teen Top for their brilliant dancing. But the song remains current, likening back to “Fire” (2016) with its pulsating, EDM-inspired background music. Unfortunately, this track too lacks equal vocal distribution, and for a group with only 7 members in a field where groups resemble small choirs and who still manage to let each voice shine, this is definitely something that needs improvement (and has for a while now).

Together, the dual release of “Spring Day” and “Not Today” just makes sense. The former relates to the groups gentler, artistic roots, while the latter incorporates just what makes BTS relevant musically and in their performance. They would work well on their own, but are better together. You Never Walk Alone is a solid start to a foreseeably successful and transformative 2017 for BTS.

anonymous asked:

not a huge Adele fan but tbf 25 was definitely more uplifting than her previous albums and there were actually some positive songs on it as well... Beyoncé should have won Best Album, no doubt, but I don't think Best Pop was undeserved

like i said i haven’t listened 2 much of her music but i’ve never gotten into adele because in general i don’t like people who are just like …. Singers? obviously she has an incredible voice but that’s all her music really does for me, i don’t find anything about her instrumentation / production or songwriting particularly interesting or unique while so many other pop stars right now are out here making pop music that incorporates different genres and influences but is still just really catchy and fun and belongs at the top of billboard charts; when i think of like, 90′s mariah carey, that’s someone who had an incredible singing voice but was also one of the first pop stars 2 push boundaries and incorporate hip hop influences into her music which resulted in songs like Fantasy, which is IMO one of the greatest pop songs of all time. i feel as though adele’s music is Boring and Safe and it’s disappointing 2 see it awarded above everything else when it’s such a unique and exciting time in pop music right now

anonymous asked:

Am I the only one that thought not today reminded me a lot of their old style? Like spring day was completely different but not today was that hard hitting hip hop influenced kind of song that they used to do. Especially the theme of their lyrics and the choreography all remind me of old bts and I love it. The song really surprised me because I was getting a little bored of the new artsy stuff and they just brought it all back to the reason I fell in love with them

Mmm. To me it reminded me of Fire which was a good thing and the reason I liked it best.

Needless to say, the Richard Rodgers Theatre is packed during every performance. “It’s so dense,” Daveed Diggs, who portrays Marquis de Lafayette and Thomas Jefferson in the biographical production about Alexander Hamilton, tells ETonline. “People are really leaning in to catch everything.”

Despite the fandom surrounding the show, Diggs says the “audience is pretty quiet” as they try to catch all the lyrics in the hip hop-influenced songs. “In other shows, everyone seems to have a coughing fit at the same time,” he says, “but we don’t get a lot of that.”


However, the show hasn’t gone on without its disturbances. “We did get somebody on their phone during the whole show,” Anthony Ramos, who stars as John Laurens and Hamilton’s eldest son, Philip, recalls, feeling the tension among the company on stage. “People were upset. Though, I thought it was pretty funny.”


In fact, it sounds like the most distracting thing is when the audience mouths along to the lyrics. “I have to not look at the audience lip-syncing in the front row,” Ramos admits, with Diggs adding that it’s gotten worse since the cast album was released.

anonymous asked:

I also think in general, not just in the fandom it's hard for people to understand cultural impact when it's not necessarily THEIR culture. Everything isn't for every audience. Like I don't think a lot of people who listen to hip hop get the influence/value of Fearless and the same with a lot of like country or pop fans can't understand the cultural importance of some hip hop. That kind of subset cross talk is hard to navigate when everyone can be so specific in what they listen to.

You’re very right.

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“I was always inspired by toy sounds. I also really love heavy percussions, anything that hits hard but still has a soft sound to it. In this case, the soft sounds were the toys and the drums were a harder sound. It was a mix between pop, alternative, and hip-hop influence for most of the songs on the album and the concept is childhood themes paired with adult situations. The title is called Cry Baby because it is the story of Cry Baby’s life, it is the fairytale version of myself but the more imperfect and insecure side to me”.

THE GET DOWN is most impressive for just HOW MUCH it is… like it was so expensive to produce (and it shows!) and it incorporates so many different tv styles (everything from the obvious hip-hop musical to genuine influences of soap operas and surrealism) and it features so many gorgeous looking sets + camera work + costumes + characters and the music is good and even though everything doesn’t fully jell with one another all the time, it added up to definitely the most interesting television experience of the year so far. 

‘Hamilton’ Ranks Among Broadway’s Heavyweights (WSJ):

“Hamilton” remained a hot ticket in town last week, once again exceeding its box-office potential.

The hip-hop-influenced musical telling the history of the first U.S. Treasury secretary, “Hamilton” brought in $1.6 million in the week ended Sept. 27, according to data provided by the Broadway League. It was the second-highest-grossing show, behind the long-running “Lion King,” with ticket sales of $1.8 million over the same period.

“Hamilton’s” sales represented 117% of its potential. It sold 10,712 tickets that week.

Shows can exceed 100% of their potential through sales of premium or standing-room tickets. For a hit like “Hamilton,” the combination has frequently boosted it above its potential, even with its relatively large venue at the Richard Rodgers Theatre, which has more than 1,300 seats.

Since it began previews on July 13, “Hamilton” consistently has been among or just below Broadway’s heavyweights in terms of ticket sales, which generally include “The Lion King” as well as “Wicked,” “The Book of Mormon” and “Aladdin.”

Lana Del Rey - Now Playing [LDR Remixes] Prod. by Urban Noize

Miami-based production duo Urban Noize is offering up a third installment in a series of absolutely incredible Lana Del Rey remix projects they’ve been producing and releasing for the past few years. 

Lana Del Rey - Now Playing [LDR Remixes] features reworkings of tracks from Del Rey’s latest LP Ultraviolence infused with psychedelic pop, alternative rock, and hip hop influences. Stream after the jump:

Keep reading

I was always inspired by toy sounds. I also really love heavy percussions, anything that hits hard but still has a soft sound to it. In this case, the soft sounds were the toys and the drums were a harder sound. It was a mix between pop, alternative, and hip-hop influence for most of the songs on the album and the concept is childhood themes paired with adult situations. The title is called Cry Baby because it is the story of Cry Baby’s life, it is the fairy tale version of myself but the more imperfect and insecure side to me.

2

“I was always inspired by toy sounds. I also really love heavy percussions, anything that hits hard but still has a soft sound to it. In this case, the soft sounds were the toys and the drums were a harder sound. It was a mix between pop, alternative, and hip-hop influence for most of the songs on the album and the concept is childhood themes paired with adult situations. The title is called Cry Baby because it is the story of Cry Baby’s life, it is the fairytale version of myself but the more imperfect and insecure side to me.” -Melanie Martinez, Direct Lyrics Interviews , 7.25.15