The truth established in the Vedas, the Puranas and the Tantras is but one Sat-cit-ānanda (Existence, Consciousness, and Bliss. Supreme reality). In the Vedas it is called Brahman, in the Puranas it is called Rama, and in the Tantras it is called Shiva. One Sat-cit-ānanda is called Brahman, Rama and Shiva.
—  Sri Ramakrishna Paramahamsa

Tired of Gothic Script and Latin? To keep you on your toes, here is something from the Indic Manuscripts Collection! 

This 5-leaf manuscript was written sometime between 1700-1850. It contains hymns from the Rigveda dedicated to the Hindu god Vāmana.

The Rigveda is an ancient Indian collection of Vedic Sanskrit hymns. It is one of the four canonical sacred texts of Hinduism known as the Vedas. The text is a collection of 1,028 hymns and 10,600 verses, organized into ten books.

See more here. 

nytlive.nytimes.com
Hindu women can be legal head of the family, Indian court rules
In a landmark decision, a New Delhi court has ruled that women can be the “karta” -- meaning the legal head of a family, according to ancient Hindu customs -- a position previously reserved for men only.

“In a landmark decision, a New Delhi court has ruled that women can be the “karta” — meaning the legal head of a family, according to ancient Hindu customs — a position previously reserved for men only. The “karta” occupies the superior position in a family and takes full control over property, rituals and other family affairs.

The ruling came about after the daughter of a business family, whose father was the eldest of four brothers, had filed a lawsuit against one of her cousins who claimed that he was now the rightful karta. The high court justified its decision as the logical conclusion of a 2005 amendment to the Hindu Succession Act, which granted women equal inheritance rights, arguing that it was rather odd that “while females would have equal rights of inheritance in an HUF property, this right could nonetheless be curtailed when it comes to the management of the same”.

Read the full piece here

AWESOME! THIS IS MAJOR. 

“The “karta” occupies the superior position in a family and takes full control over property, rituals and other family affairs.”

Hindus Wearing White for Mourning

@mountaindave asked:

I’ve been trying to do some in-depth research (on the internet) on why white is the colour of mourning for Hindus (for my book) but I can’t find anything that isn’t written by a white person and the only thing I found was an article from an Indian magazine that didn’t go into much detail. I would ask my friend who is Hindu but she’s sick of having to explain parts of her culture to people and I don’t want to rely on her for research into Hinduism as that doesn’t seem fair

Could you phrase this question in the form of a question?

The short answer is death has a millennia-old association with ritual impurity for the blood family of the deceased and as white is a color associated with purity, wearing white was traditionally part of the purification rituals expected of them for a period after the death.  Over time this just got graded down into wearing white while mourning, as few people still observe all the purity strictures from so long ago (such as not going to temples or observing any religious rituals except for funerary rites, not giving alms, not attending parties/marriages, etc.) but just dressing in white is easy enough so it stuck around.

~Mod Nikhil

INDIA, Amritsar : An Indian dancer performs a fire breathing act during a procession to mark the 661st anniversary of the birth of Hindu guru Bawa Lal Dayal Maharaj in Amritsar on February 9, 2016. Bawa Lal Dayal Maharaj, a popular leader of his time, is especially revered by devotees of a temple in the town of Dhyanpur, some 45 kms north of Amritsar. AFP PHOTO/NARINDER NANU

SOMA: 

SOMA was a fermented juice drink which was believed to have been consumed by the Hindu gods and their ancient priests, the brahmanas, during rituals. Thought to be an elixir its consumption not only healed illness but also brought great riches. 

Soma is personified by the god of the same name who is also the god of sacrifices and who may, in some texts, be associated with the Moon. The drink is famously described and praised in a Mandalaof the sacred Hindu text, the Rigveda.

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Article by Mark Cartwright on AHE