hindemith

I’m aching to move into my apartment solely for the fact that I can practice in a practice room again. Whenever I’m living at home, whether it be for a week or for a whole year, I find my practicing productivity to decline. Maybe it’s simply because it’s easier for me to relax, or because I constantly have the, “I’ll practice later, I have all day” mentality. Either way, I get nothing done flute-wise when I’m home. Right now I’m attempting to start two new etude books, while nitpicking my way though Hindemith’s Eight Pieces. Though seemingly simple pieces, they become a lot more demanding and challenging when you’re studying them with a man who was a close friend of Hindemith’s. If you really break it down, there’s a lot to them. Which honestly makes me adore them even more than I did before. I just hope that I can prep these pieces well enough before my lesson on Wednesday. Especially considering the fact that I can barely move my upper body after my car accident. I digress though. What I really wanted to say was I hope I’m back in a practice room sooner rather than later because I know I’ll get more done there.

  • Hindemith - Symphony In B-Flat For Band - Fugue: Rather Broad
  • US Marine Band
  • Emblems
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Hindemith
Symphony in B-flat for band
III. Fugue

United States Marine Band
Col Timothy W. Foley

Paul Hindemith, a tireless music educator and enthusiast of all sorts of ensembles, most famously turned his attention to the modern wind band when he composed his Symphony in B-flat for the “Pershing’s Own” United States Army Band in 1951. Though composers had been regularly writing and transcribing for bands for some decades, the issue of whether or not the concert band was a valid medium for serious art music was still contentious in many quarters. Less than a year later, Frederick Fennell would found the Eastman Wind Ensemble and personally mail letters to more than 400 composers soliciting original repertoire; Percy Grainger, Ralph Vaughan Williams, and Vincent Persichetti were among the first to respond. 

(image by Dionne Hartnett)