himba peoples

Himba People - Namibia

The Himba people are the indigenous people of Northern Namibia, also residing in parts of Angola, particularly along the Kunene River. They are a semi-nomadic and pastoral community. Himba women take on many roles in their community, everything from creating handicrafts and minding children, to building homes from mud bricks. 

In the Himba community, hairstyle is used to symbolise social status. Men often have a single plait that extends towards the rear of their head. Women have vertical plaits. Variations of these styles can denote details such as whether a tribe member is married. 

amazon.com
Amazon.com: Binti eBook: Nnedi Okorafor: Kindle Store
Binti - Kindle edition by Nnedi Okorafor. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Binti.

Her name is Binti, and she is the first of the Himba people ever to be offered a place at Oomza University, the finest institution of higher learning in the galaxy. But to accept the offer will mean giving up her place in her family to travel between the stars among strangers who do not share her ways or respect her customs.

Knowledge comes at a cost, one that Binti is willing to pay, but her journey will not be easy. The world she seeks to enter has long warred with the Meduse, an alien race that has become the stuff of nightmares. Oomza University has wronged the Meduse, and Binti’s stellar travel will bring her within their deadly reach.

If Binti hopes to survive the legacy of a war not of her making, she will need both the the gifts of her people and the wisdom enshrined within the University, itself — but first she has to make it there, alive.

- Highly recommended for anybody looking for diverse science-fiction. The author herself describes this as “Afrofuturism” - the latest novella in the series is out soon and you can download this one for just $2.99 right now!

Her name is Binti, and she is the first of the Himba people ever to be offered a place at Oomza University, the finest institution of higher learning in the galaxy. But to accept the offer will mean giving up her place in her family to travel between the stars among strangers who do not share her ways or respect her customs.

Knowledge comes at a cost, one that Binti is willing to pay, but her journey will not be easy. The world she seeks to enter has long warred with the Meduse, an alien race that has become the stuff of nightmares. Oomza University has wronged the Meduse, and Binti’s stellar travel will bring her within their deadly reach.

If Binti hopes to survive the legacy of a war not of her making, she will need both the the gifts of her people and the wisdom enshrined within the University, itself - but first she has to make it there, alive.

Nnedi Okorafor, born to Igbo Nigerian parents in Cincinnati, Ohio on April 8, 1974, is an author of fantasy and science fiction for both adults and younger readers. Her children’s book Long Juju Man (Macmillan, 2009) won the 2007-08 Macmillan Writer’s Prize for Africa, and her adult novel Who Fears Death (DAW, 2010) was a Tiptree Honor Book. She is currently a professor of creative writing at Chicago State University.

Binti will be released on September 22, 2015. Order here.

“You have exactly twenty-one,” he said. “And they’re braided in tessellating triangles. Is it some sort of code?”


I wanted to tell him that there was a code, that the pattern spoke my family’s bloodline, culture, and history. That my father had designed the code and my mother and aunties had shown me how to braid it into my hair.

— 

Binti, Nnedi Okorafor

Binti is the first of the Himba people ever to be offered a place at Oomza University, the finest institution of higher learning in the galaxy. But to accept the offer will mean giving up her place in her family to travel between the stars among strangers who do not share her ways or respect her customs.

This part stuck out to me the most because Okorafor shows that blackness and science aren’t mutually exclusive and that black people can exist within the science fiction canon without having to fully assimilate into whiteness. She demonstrates how fantasy, science fiction, and blackness can co-exist without lessening one of them which most think need to happen in order for it to make sense. Science fiction and fantasy are usually depicted on the notion that is the future and to envision a future void of black people (and people of color as a whole) is bordering on white supremacy. Okorafor dispels this with Binti.

4

~Miraculous Holders: In Pharaon episode and Formers Ladybugs Miraculous holders by Thomas Astruc~

In Pharaon:

  • Ancient Egyptian Ladybug (Red circle)
  • Ancient Egyptian Chat Noir (Green square)

Kwami Appearance: Tikki 

Art of Ladybug’s holders:

  • Hyppolitia (Greek)
  • Jeanne d'Arc (Frist appearance in Origins 1, French)
  • Mudekudeku (Himba people - African)
  • Ladybug/Marinette Dupain-Cheng (Current miraculous holder)
Binti - Nnedi Okorafor

My Rating: Completely Adored It

Specific Genre: Science Fiction Novella

Blurb:  Her name is Binti, and she is the first of the Himba people ever to be offered a place at Oomza University, the finest institution of higher learning in the galaxy. But to accept the offer will mean giving up her place in her family to travel between the stars among strangers who do not share her ways or respect her customs.
Knowledge comes at a cost, one that Binti is willing to pay, but her journey will not be easy. The world she seeks to enter has long warred with the Meduse, an alien race that has become the stuff of nightmares. Oomza University has wronged the Meduse, and Binti’s stellar travel will bring her within their deadly reach.
If Binti hopes to survive the legacy of a war not of her making, she will need both the the gifts of her people and the wisdom enshrined within the University, itself - but first she has to make it there, alive.

My Review: My first reaction on finishing this novella was just the word “wow” repeated over and over again. This is a stunning work of science fiction. The thread of Binti’s Himba heritage is woven inextricably through the story, and it is all the better for it. The genderless aliens are fascinating in their biology. The plot takes an amazing twist halfway through, and it took me completely by surprise. Overall, this is a must-read! 

For fans of: really good science fiction, space travel, cool aliens, great leading women.

I received a review copy of this novella from Tor.com Publishing and that has in no way affected my review. 

soft-plushboy  asked:

Have you read Binti? By Nnedi Okorafor.

Her name is Binti, and she is the first of the Himba people ever to be offered a place at Oomza University, the finest institution of higher learning in the galaxy. But to accept the offer will mean giving up her place in her family to travel between the stars among strangers who do not share her ways or respect her customs.

I can’t say I have. Extrapolated sci-fi in a [rarely explored] culturally-specific narrative elates the hell out of me. And the Otjize paste streaked across her face, her hands– I love it. Thank you so much for sharing.

Gaps in perception

Until we have a way to describe something, even something so fundamental as a color, we may not even notice that it’s there.

Early in 2015, Business Insider’s Kevin Loria wrote an article (itself inspired by a Radiolab episode) about color perception. Descriptions of color in Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey were, by the 1800s, recognized as off. Honey is dubbed green; sheep are violet; and oxen and the ocean both are “wine-dark”. More unusually: while the books contain over 190,000 words together, the color blue is not mentioned. Analysis of other Greek texts reveals similar issues–and a similar absence of this color. Modern authors have suggested that blue, although common in ancient Greek painting, was not at the time sharply distinguished from black. Comparably bizarre understandings of color have been found in ancient books globally, from the Hebrew Bible to the Vedas. And physiology is not to blame.

Live examples of “abnormal” color perception persist, as Loria writes. In a recent experiment, Namibia’s Himba people–whose language conflates blue and green–had trouble spotting blue amid instances of green. Yet their language outstrips English in words for green hues; and the subjects detected a green outlier so slight as to be invisible to most English speakers. Last year, we argued that facts are a modern myth. Truth–in ethics, physics and other branches of knowledge–is never neutral or self-evident: one sees it through lenses, through traditions of thought passed down and developed over centuries. The Himba people struggle to see blue, but our Western color-tradition has largely blinded us to the greens that they know. Whatever our gains in knowledge, there remain blindspots in the West’s vision that perhaps only an outside lens can perceive.

Still Eating Oranges

WOW MY DUMB ASS FORGOT I’D READ ENDERS GAME

TRY ENDERS GAME IT GOOD idk about any of the follow up books yet…
Dune is fucking dry as hell but it’s good, got a nice audiobook

One book I have saved up to read/listen to is uuuh Binti

“Her name is Binti, and she is the first of the Himba people ever to be offered a place at Oomza University, the finest institution of higher learning in the galaxy. But to accept the offer will mean giving up her place in her family to travel between the stars among strangers who do not share her ways or respect her customs.

Knowledge comes at a cost, one that Binti is willing to pay, but her journey will not be easy. The world she seeks to enter has long warred with the Meduse, an alien race that has become the stuff of nightmares. Oomza University has wronged the Meduse, and Binti’s stellar travel will bring her within their deadly reach.

If Binti hopes to survive the legacy of a war not of her making, she will need both the gifts of her people and the wisdom enshrined within the University, itself - but first she has to make it there, alive.”

AAAND the Martian I’m part way thru…the dude is a hoot