high school shooter

Ely Serna, 17, has officially been identified as the West Liberty High School shooter. Ely will go in front of juvenile courts for his hearing on Monday, they will try him as an adult. He will be charged with the following; two counts of attempted murder, three counts of felonious assault, six counts of improperly discharging a firearm at or into a habitation or a school safety zone, one count of inducing panic and one count of illegal conveyance or possession of deadly weapon or dangerous ordnance or of object indistinguishable from firearm in school safety zone. 

“The first thing I thought is, `Eric and Dylan, why did you do this?’ But also something ran through saying, `You guys finally did it. You did something”.

Erik Veik - A friend Of Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold 

School/University Shooter Voices
  • School/University Shooter Voices
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Audio recordings of various school or university shooters. Note: Elliot Rodger isn’t necessarily a school/university shooter, as his attack was only on the campus, and three of his victims were stabbed to death, not shot.  Still fits into the theme, in my opinion.

In chronological order: Kip Kinkel (1998) - Dylan Klebold (†1999) - Eric Harris (†1999) - Seung-hui Cho (†2007) - Pekka-Eric Auvinen (†2007) - TJ Lane (2012) - Adam Lanza (†2012) - Elliot Rodger (†2014) - Dylann Roof (2015)

KIP KINKEL’S THERAPY NOTES

January 20, 1997

Kip is a fourteen-year-old boy with brown hair and blue eyes. He was adequately groomed and casually dressed in a green sweatshirt, black corduroy pants and a black leather jacket. He was oriented as to person, place and time with no evidence of delusional thinking or other thought disorder symptoms. His attention and concentration were adequate for interview purposes. His speech was logical, coherent and goal-directed He was initially sullen but became more cooperative as the interview progressed. He became tearful when discussing his relationship with his father. He reported his mother views him as a “good kid with some bad habits” while his father sees him as “a bad kid with bad habits.” He feels his father expects the worst from him and was not supportive of counseling because of the expense and his belief that it will not be helpful. Kip reported he often feels angry but does not know why he feels this emotion. Kip reported he makes explosives from gasoline and other household items and detonates them at a nearby quarry to vent feelings of anger. He denies intent to harm people or property. If he has a “bad day” at school, he feels better after detonating an explosive. I cautioned Kip that gasoline is very dangerous and advised he not use it for such purposes. When asked with whom he can talk about personal issues he identified his friends and, to a lesser degree, his mother. He cannot discuss his feelings with his father for fear he will become angry with him. He feels he has little in common with his parents and finds talking to them difficult. He is receptive to ongoing therapy. Occasionally tearful when discussing his relationship with his father. Kip is very angry and vents this anger by antisocial acting-out and detonating explosives. He is at risk for accidentally harming himself or others with explosives. He is also high risk for continued antisocial behavior. He is angry toward his father whom he regards as very critical of him and has inadequate strategies for venting this anger. A See in one week with a focus on appropriate strategies for managing anger and improving communication between Kip and his parents.

January 27, 1997

Good week. Temper under good control. Bill making a strong effort to be more positive with Kip and they had a good talk yesterday. No further use of explosives or playing with weapons. Feels less angry and is pleased with his father’s efforts. Less angry and less depressed. See in three weeks.

February 26, 1997

Faith reports Kip is doing very well. Kip is feeling less angry and recently achieved a 104% in math class. He met with Dr. Crumbley this morning who assigned thirty-two hours of community service will require he write an apology letter to owner of car he hit with a rock and pay for damage to car ($50.00). No prosecution planned though, if he is arrested within six months, he will be prosecuted for this event and the rock throwing Faith feels Bill is making an effort to be more positive with Kip though he sometimes continues to add a negative comment after praising Kip. Kip predicts he will be able to stay out of trouble in the future. He is not practicing specific techniques for managing anger Suggested he consider riding his bike, running, shooting baskets or tearing old magazines(old phone books or newspapers) when angry.  Good effort by Kip to manage anger. He continues to feel depressed several days per week but denies suicidal ideation.

April 30, 1997

Kip and Faith in. Kip angry and upset about two suspensions in the past week. Last week he was suspended for two days for kicking a peer in the head after this boy has shoved him. Kip is angry that the other boy, who started the altercation, was not punished. Yesterday, Kip was suspended for three days for throwing a pencil at another boy. The teacher, Mr. Boom, saw this as an assault, therefore the three-day suspension. Both Kip and Faith have questions about how these incidents were handled by school personnel. Recommended parents consult with school officials, perhaps  Mr. Nelson, to inform them of how much progress Kip has made and show them the excellent grades and positive teacher comments from this past term. Kip may have overreacted but feels unfairly treated by school officials. It is important he feels supported by his parents and that school personnel acknowledge his improved behavior and performance.

June 02, 1997

Behavior under good control but his mother is concerned he seems too cynical and disinterested in participating in Summer camps. His father continues to make a strong effort to reach-out to Kip and to be positive with him. Discussion with Faith about possible use of antidepressants. She agrees Kip is having ongoing difficulty with depression symptoms and is receptive to considering a trial of an antidepressant. Kip reports, “Eating is like a chore.” He complains that food doesn’t taste good. He often feels bored and in irritable. He feels tired upon awakening most mornings. He reports there is nothing to which he is looking forward. He denies suicidal ideation, intent or plan of action.

June 18, 1997

PROBLEM: Depression. DATA: Dr. Geisler started him on Prozac 20 mg. A.M. twelve days ago. He is sleeping better and there have been no temper outbursts. Kip is taking the Prozac as prescribed and reports no side-effects. His father is making a good effort to spend time with him and Kip is pleased with this change. ASSESSMENT: Kip appears less depressed though it is certainly too early to assess the usefulness of the Prozac. PLAN: See in three weeks.

July 09, 1997

PROBLEM: Depression. DATA: Faith in with Kip. He missed two days of Prozac while camping with friends but is generally taking it as prescribed. She reports he is less irritable and generally in a better mood with no temper outbursts. His energy remains low but he is sleeping well and his appetite is normal. He is getting long well with his parents and his father continues to make efforts to spend time with him. ASSESSMENT: Kip appears less depressed and is generally doing well. PLAN: See in three weeks.

July 30, 1997

PROBLEM: Depression. DATA: Kip continues to do well. He is taking Prozac 20 mg. A.M. daily with no sideeffects. He does not appear depressed and denies depression symptoms. His mother reports his moods have generally been quite good. He recently returned from a family reunion in San Diego and was very well behaved and seemed to have a good time.

If you want to like serial killers and school shooters, do it. It’s not wrong to be fascinated by true crime. You’re not crazy. You just have normal interests like everyone else. It’s far from wrong.

You are allowed to like what you want to, don’t let any assholes tell you you’re crazy.

Kip Kinkel’s Hallucinations and Delusions

Kip reported that he began hearing voices when he was in sixth grade. The first time he heard a voice it told him, ‘You need to kill everyone, everyone in the world.’ It also told him, ‘You are a stupid piece of shit. You are’t worth anything.’ Thus, from the onset of his psychosis, Kip heard voices that urged him toward both homicide and suicide.

When asked where the voices came from, Kip had a couple of ideas. One idea was that he was hearing the devil. Another, was that the government might have put a computer chip in his head, with satellites transmitting messages to the chip.

Kip went on the describe three different voices: A, B and C. The ‘A voice’ was loud and authoritarian and told him what to do. The ‘B voice’ made derogatory statements to him. The ‘C voice’ repeated what the other two said or commentated on them. Sometimes he heard the voices talking to each other about him. Kip tried a variety of things to make the voices stop, including exercise, watching television, and punching himself in the head. After he was arrested and was giving his confession, he cried out about the voices and began banging his head against the wall.

Less than a month before the attack, Kip yelled in class, ‘God damn this voice inside my head.’ He was cited for misbehaviour, and a disciplinary form that quoted his outburst was sent home and signed by his mother. When his teacher asked Kip if he was really hearing voices, Kip denied it. He was painfully aware that being ‘crazy’ would lead to ostracism at school and be a major disappointment to his parents. Thus, his fear of being labelled as crazy prevented him from getting the help he desperately needed.

Kip’s delusions included paranoia that China was going to invade the US. In preparation for this, Kip had built bombs and stockpiled guns. Kip said about China: ‘They are so huge. They have nuclear weapons. Seemed like I would end up fighting them. I had lots of fantasies about fighting the Chinese.’ Another of Kip’s obsessions was his fear that the world was about to experience a plague. He feared the end of the world and the falling apart of society. He wanted to build a bomb shelter and accumulate food and supplies. Kip also believed that Disney was taking over the world and would replace the American dollar with the Disney dollar, featuring a picture of Mickey Mouse. In talking about Disney, Kip told Dr Bolstad, ‘No one of average intelligence sees it with Disney. You have to be smarter.’

Kip had other delusions. He said that sex criminals had chips put in them. He seemed to think that the television show The X Files indicated that the government was experimenting with putting chips in people. He said the chips could produce voices, adding, ‘Maybe that’s the way they’re controlling me.’ After the attack, Kip continued to be paranoid. Dr William Sack, a psychiatrist who worked with Kip in prison, reported that Kip thought visitors might have cameras in their glasses. He was also afraid his medication might be poisoned.

Besides auditory hallucinations, Kip may have also experiences visual ones. He told strange stories about a man who allegedly lived nearby and drove a car with bullet holes in it. Kip was so afraid of him that he said he bought a stolen gun because he needed protection in case the man came after him. It is not clear if Kip was paranoid about a real man who lived nearby, or if he was having visual hallucinations.

Adapted from ‘Why Kids Kill’ by Peter Langman

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Frontier Middle School shooting; February 2, 1996:
Loukaitis was widely believed to be frequently bullied in school, which impelled him to cause the murderous school rampage.Those who knew him claim that he complained of being beaten by other students, being sexually harassed, having his head repeatedly stuffed into toilets, and being held down while another student urinated on him.He was also taking ritalin at the time of the shooting.
On February 2, 1996, Loukaitis dressed as a wild west-style gunslinger and used a duster to conceal a hunting rifle and two handguns. He was carrying approximately 80 rounds of ammunition.
Update:
Loukaitis could be re-sentenced due to a US Supreme Court decision, in which people convicted of a murder they committed under 16 years of age can be paroled in 25 years. Loukaitis could be released as early as 2021.

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Crime scene photos from the west entrance of Columbine Highschool, where Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold entered on the day of the shooting. This is where they murdered their first victim, Rachel Scott, who had been sitting on the grass just outside the entrance. She was killed instantly after being hit four times - it is unclear which shooter fired first.