high evaluation

re: [quest] Chapter 4 “sponse”

Hello!! So … before we get to it, here’s my explanation of what I’m up to with re: quest. So far, I’ve been BURIED in school and, as far as translations go, have mainly been chipping away at outlines/summaries as well as my tagging system to make things as convenient for you guys as I can. But, at the same time, I thought I should give you some kind of content to get the ball rolling! So I spent all day yesterday and today fleshing out my translation for Part 1 of Chapter 4, “Sponse” (I’m pretty close with the rest of the chapter too – just have lotsa editing to do). This chapter is about Hori Chie and Tsukiyama Shuu and is very cute (happy birthday the other day, 2/25, to Hori, btw!!)♥

About my tagging system and overall formatting: so far, my links for desktop are all set. This post will have Part 1 of the chapter in full under the cut (mainly for mobile users). While posts like this will have as much content as I can include in them, I’ll be using posts primarily as way of announcement for updates. All of the translation content will be on my blog’s Quest Navigation Page, which can also be accessed through my translations page on the main navbar (I am aware that these links don’t work for mobile – that’s why I’ll try to put as much content as I can in posts. The issue is that I can’t guarantee content in posts will stay available). Finally, a disclaimer: I’d encourage anyone invested in the Tokyo Ghoul series to buy the official copies of this light novel and its official translations when they are released in your area to support the authors and publishers.

Thank you everyone for your patience and please please please, don’t hesitate to send me corrections/suggestions/asks and messages about this project! It’s a big work in progress, and there will definitely be some mess-ups on my part, but my hope is that we can all enjoy some more of Quest. It’s pretty awesome. – koko♥

Chapter 4: Sponse Part 1
TL: As we all know and love, occasionally Tsukiyama throws in English or French words when he’s talking. Anything he says that’s written in Roman letters in the original Japanese text, I will both italicize and underline. All other emphatic markings only for conveying their own regular emphasis.

   “Alright, now take a picture, of me!”
   “Nahh,” Hori replied, and the conversation was over in 3 seconds. She was watching through the coffee shop’s big windows at the shopping street where people came and went, housewives buying things for dinner and hoisting bulky eco-bags on their shoulders.
   Hori looked like an uncomfortable elementary school student in the chic and relaxed coffee shop where she sat. However, inside, she was already at the level of a college student. Well, actually, she almost never went to college, as she roamed from east to west as a “free camera-man” with her camera, her one hobby, always by her side.

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4

Opel Turbo Manta, 1973. Initially 5 prototypes were built by British company Broadspeed for Opel for promotional and evaluation purposes. High fuel consumption and the cost of the conversion put Opel off marketing the car however Dealer Opel Team (D.O.T.), the British importer of Opel cars, went ahead with the project and another 28 cars were converted in 1974 based on the Manta Berlinetta model

anonymous asked:

So I'm autistic and have a professional diagnosis (well, actually 2, but that's a tangent I don't need to go on) and I have a really hard time dealing with self dx autistic people. I think relying on self-diagnosis alone is a terrible idea for any condition, but I'm genuinely scared to publicly say anything along those lines. What should I do?

To start, you are allowed to have your own opinion. However, you are not entitled to have that opinion free of consequence. If others disagree with you, they are welcome to express their own opinions and disagreement. This should not be viewed as something to fear but something to potentially learn and grow from. 

This ask displays a lack of understanding of the reasons for self-diagnosis as well as a poor understanding of how the medical field operates in general. We are going to explain the barriers to professional diagnosis as well as the reasons for self-diagnosis. Some of the following has been copied from the FAQ.

First, disability exists whether or not it has been professionally diagnosed. Having a professional give your disability a name doesn’t make it suddenly appear. It is the existence of a disability that leads to a diagnosis. Just because someone is self-diagnosed, doesn’t mean they aren’t disabled.

Four hundred years ago we did not have the autism diagnosis, but does that mean that autism didn’t exist? Is an artist not an artist if someone refuses to acknowledge their art?

Self- diagnosis in it’s most basic form is self-realization. It is a method by which we can acknowledge our struggles and devise plans of action to help ourselves and methods of living that best suit our individual needs. Autism is a condition that exists within a spectrum with varying degrees of need for support. Innate to this question is the assumption that an individual is unable to recognize the struggles that they face. This is in no uncertain terms a display of utter ignorance to the human condition as well as being deeply rooted in ableism. Not only do you discount the ability for someone to recognize their place in a community but you attempt to gatekeep a community that faces nothing but derision and, often times, hatred from neurotypical (and often non-autistic neurodivergent) communities. You serve no one, and least of all yourself, by holding such opinions, and encourage further isolation amongst a group of people who already are made to feel isolated and alone. 

Furthermore, a professional diagnosis is a luxury only afforded to some. There are significant barriers that are faced when trying to pursue a professional diagnosis. The simplest of which is the financial barrier. A professional diagnosis can cost thousands of dollars, and, given that many undiagnosed autistic people live in or near poverty, is often unattainable. Someone struggling to live cannot afford the luxury of a professional diagnosis. Further, women and people of other genders who are not cismen often face significant barriers to getting a diagnosis due to stereotypes and ableism within the psychiatric community. The template for diagnosis is based on straight, able-bodied, white, cismen and as such does a disservice to those who deviate from that including POC, people with other disabilities, trans people, LGBTQIA+ people, and people with other marginalized identities. 

For people under 18, they need the support of their parents to get a diagnosis. Many parents refuse to admit there might be something “wrong” with their child no matter how apparent a disability is and would rather think their child is just lazy or bad. For instance, Sean’s sister has severe PCOS that just got diagnosed despite her showing clear symptoms for several years and both of us pushing to get her checked out. She was sleeping constantly, was horribly depressed, and had other symptoms but her parents decided she was just lazy and that she just needed to try harder. This is not uncommon, and, without a parent’s approval, most minors will not be able to get a diagnosis.

On top of all this, for many adults, a professional diagnosis can do more harm than good. A professional diagnosis can be used to take away someone’s children or to involuntarily institutionalize someone. It can bar people from being allowed to adopt or foster children. Meanwhile, for many adults, there are few accommodations that would be provided with a professional diagnosis. Many workplaces are loathe to accommodate workers and revealing your status as a disabled employee can put your job at risk (Yes, we know this is against the law but that doesn’t mean it doesn’t happen. It just means that employers will come up with false reasons to fire people or make their work lives hell).

So, how can a self-diagnosis actually help? Understanding how your mind works can allow you to accommodate yourself and work with those you interact with to make your life better. For instance, most of the accommodations in my life (Sabrina) are things that I have created for myself as there is little that can be done for me by others in my current situation. I’m able to use noise cancelling headphones when I go out in public to reduce sensory overload. I can get myself stim toys to help regulate my senses and emotions. I can limit social interaction to a level that is tolerable for me. I have the words to explain my difficulties to others so that they have understanding when I struggle. I can explain my auditory processing difficulties. I have an app that speaks for me when I go nonverbal. None of this requires a diagnosis.

For many, a professional diagnosis simply isn’t an option. This doesn’t mean they aren’t disabled. It just means that for whatever reason their disability cannot be diagnosed. 

To finish up, I (Sabrina) want to share my experience getting diagnosed with ADHD because it illustrates a lot of the issues with expecting everyone to get professionally diagnosed. I was evaluated in high school. the whole hours and hours of testing thing. At the end of it, I was told that, while I scored high in all the ADHD tests (meaning I have ADHD), I would not be diagnosed because “my grades were too high” and I wasn’t a disruption in class. Basically, because I had managed to find coping skills, I was denied a diagnosis even though my symptoms were causing all sorts of issues in my life. It wasn’t until about a decade later that I was finally diagnosed and treated which quite literally changed my life. Had I been diagnosed earlier, there’s a chance I might have actually finished college on time. I might have done much better in my college career. I might not be living in near poverty now. But because of biases of professionals, I was denied a needed diagnosis and thus the help I needed. This was before I knew of self diagnosis or how to find help for myself so I wasn’t able to find ways to improve my symptoms on my own. Now I’m on treatment and I have found a lot of ways to help myself that have changed my life.

Sean would also like to add his experience getting diagnosed with schizophrenia. It took almost a year to officially receive the diagnosis of schizophrenic, which is honestly short compared to many other people’s diagnosis journeys. During this time period, I was hallucinating constantly, delusional, and incredibly reckless, but, due to the current stigma against the diagnosis of schizophrenic, I had to wade through a myriad of unhelpful and, oftentimes, damaging psychological medications. I was vaguely aware upon seeking a psychiatrist that it was most likely the early signs of schizophrenia. The disease is one I was not unfamiliar with and had seen it’s horrifying effects on members of my own family. I thought I was a monster and that my life as I knew it was over. It was not until I began researching schizophrenia from the point of view of other schizophrenics that I found peace and the ability to push forward in my life. Many of these schizophrenics were unmedicated and self-diagnosed, but their experiences were so similar to my own they were able to offer insight and security that no amount of psychological therapy has been able to provide. Without these self-diagnosed schizophrenics, I would likely not be here today. 

Self-diagnosis is vital for autism, and many other conditions, because otherwise so many people who are legitimately disabled would be kept from the resources and help they desperately need. 

-Sabrina and Sean

tvline.com
Grey's Jerrika Hinton Reflects On Stephanie's 'Burnout' and Her 'Delicate, Nuanced Hero's Journey'| TVLine

Grey’s Anatomy viewers might have been shocked — and relieved — when the Season 13 finale revealed that Stephanie hadn’t been killed by the preceding episode’s climactic explosion. But “I knew” there was still more to come, Jerrika Hinton tells TVLine. “My exit has been something that [series creator] Shonda [Rhimes] and I have talked about for almost a year now, so there were no surprises.” Here, the actress, who’ll next appear in Alan Ball’s forthcoming HBO series, shares her thoughts on her spunky character’s sendoff — and likelihood of returning — and reveals how fired up she got doing some of her own stunts.

TVLINE | What was your reaction to Stephanie’s last act? I was glad that, if she had to go, at least she got to leave a hero.
I think it’s a delicate, nuanced kind of hero’s journey that [she’s been on this season, one that] you don’t often see in this genre. It’s been about self-actualization and the fact that she is in a line of work that encourages repression and distance, and, at the same time, still asks that you give every single ounce of yourself that you have to give. She was sacrificing herself. She began the season with no space to process her loss [after Kyle’s death] and immediately jumped back into work because it was a reliable thing that she knew. And when work became unreliable, she drifted even further until she was sacrificing her well-being for a place that it can be argued would not have done the same for her. These were conditions that, in hindsight, were figuratively and literally burning her out. She needed to not only see that but make a healthy decision about how to move forward.

TVLINE | And if, in a year or two, she feels differently, she could always come back, right?
I would say, after the way the episode ends, it would be very difficult for Stephanie to practice medicine again in the way that she had become accustomed to. Personally, I’m just glad she gets to leave having made her mark.

TVLINE | Speaking of marks… how bruised up were you after two episodes’ worth of stunts?
[Laughs] I’m still recovering physically from that, and we finished [the finale] probably a month ago!

TVLINE | How much of it did they actually let you do?
There’s a fair amount that’s me. My lovely stunt double did some of the jumping through fire, and there was one specific shot that they absolutely would not allow me to do — where a piece of the ceiling comes crashing down in front of Stephanie and Erin. They were adamant about that. I haven’t seen the episode yet, but I would say that I’m probably going to be confused as to which shots are me and which are [my stunt double].  

TVLINE | Looking back over your five seasons on Grey’s, what was your favorite storyline?
I would say this one. It touches on things that are dear to my heart, and I think it’s always valuable to see someone that the audience may hold in high regard evaluating their priorities and just taking stock of how they want to move through the world, how to live the life that best serves them. It’s a very Oprah-fied way of looking at the world, but it’s also crucial. And as someone who is a huge advocate of therapy and mental health, I think there are elements in the story that are universal.

TVLINE | Anything that you didn’t get to do storywise that you wish you had?
I was sorry they never hooked up Stephanie and DeLuca. [Laughs] You weren’t the only one! I saw that on Twitter quite a bit! To be honest, I haven’t even gone there. My time on Grey’s Anatomy… it’s been so many things, and it has opened up so many other things to me, that, at the end of this time, I can’t even look back on it and go, “But you know, if only this one thing!” I’m not trying to be pie-in-the-sky Pollyanna. I am genuinely incapable of looking back on my time that way and thinking with “If only… ” reservations.

anonymous asked:

Are you against self dxing?

Copied from our FAQ:

Do you support self-diagnosis?

Yes! Disability exists whether or not it has been professionally diagnosed. Having a professional give your disability a name doesn’t make it suddenly appear. It is the existence of a disability that leads to a diagnosis. Just because someone is self-diagnosed, doesn’t mean they aren’t disabled.

The biggest barrier that stands between many and a diagnosis is cost, especially for those who were missed during school age years. A professional diagnosis can cost thousands of dollars for an adult. Many of us who reached adulthood undiagnosed struggle to make ends meet as is. How is someone struggling to survive supposed to just magically come up with thousands of dollars for a professional to tell them what they already know?

Further, there is a lot of bias in the psychiatric industry. People of color, women, people with other disabilities, gender non-conforming people, and people of other marginalized identities are less likely to be accurately diagnosed. Many have been misdiagnosed or just blown off by the psych industry.

For people under 18, they need the support of their parents to get a diagnosis. Many parents refuse to admit there might be something “wrong” with their child no matter how apparent a disability is and would rather think their child is just lazy or bad. For instance, my sister in law has severe PCOS that just got diagnosed despite her showing clear symptoms for over a year and my husband and I pushing to get her checked out. She was sleeping constantly, was horribly depressed, and had other symptoms but her parents decided she was just lazy and that she just needed to try harder. This is not uncommon and without a parents approval, most minors will not be able to get a diagnosis.

On top of all this, for many adults, a professional diagnosis can do more harm than good. A professional diagnosis can be used to take away someone’s children or to involuntarily institutionalize someone. It can bar people from being allowed to adopt or foster children. Meanwhile, for many adults, there are few accommodations that would be provided with a professional diagnosis. Many workplaces are loathe to accommodate workers and revealing your status as a disabled employee can put your job at risk (Yes, I know this is against the law but that doesn’t mean it doesn’t happen. It just means that employers will come up with false reasons to fire people or make their work lives hell).

So, how can a self-diagnosis actually help? Understanding how your mind works can allow you to accommodate yourself and work with those you interact with to make your life better. For instance, most of the accommodations in my life are things that I have created for myself as there is little that can be done for me by others in my current situation. I’m able to use noise cancelling headphones when I go out in public to reduce sensory overload. I can get myself stim toys to help regulate my senses and emotions. I can limit social interaction to a level that is tolerable for me. I have the words to explain my difficulties to others so that they have understanding when I struggle. I can explain my auditory processing difficulties. I have an app that speaks for me when I go nonverbal. None of this requires a diagnosis.

For many, a professional diagnosis simply isn’t an option. This doesn’t mean they aren’t disabled. It just means that for whatever reason their disability cannot be diagnosed.

To finish up, I want to share my experience getting diagnosed with ADHD because it illustrates a lot of the issues with expecting everyone to get professionally diagnosed. I was evaluated in high school. the whole hours and hours of testing thing. At the end of it, I was told that while I scored high in all the ADHD tests (meaning I have ADHD) I would not be diagnosed because “my grades were too high” and I wasn’t a disruption in class. Basically, because I had managed to find coping skills, I was denied a diagnosis even though my symptoms were causing all sorts of issues in my life. It wasn’t until about a decade later that I was finally diagnosed and treated which quite literally changed my life. Had I been diagnosed earlier, there’s a chance I might have actually finished college on time. I might have done much better in my college career. I might not be living in near poverty now. But because of biases of professionals, I was denied a needed diagnosis and thus the help I needed. This was before I knew of self diagnosis or how to find help for myself so I wasn’t able to find ways to improve my symptoms on my own. Now I’m on treatment and I have found a lot of ways to help myself that have changed my life.

Self-diagnosis is vital for autism because otherwise so many people who are legitimately disabled would be kept from the resources and help they desperately need.

-Sabrina

HOLMES: High-Optional, Logical, Multi-Evaluating Supervisor : Mark IV : Mike: Mycroft

The Headquarters of the Lunar Authority on Earth are in the city of Agra, near the Taj Mahal.

Cannon fired on July 4th.

Mike loses its self-awareness and its human-like qualities.

Joker Game Drama CD 2: Track 1 Translation

Special thanks to @ahahahahaderp for sharing the CDs with me.

Track One / Track Two / Track Three / Cast Comment


0:00

Sakuma: Metropolitan Police Department・Special Investigation Cases D Division. A classified division within the police force that deal with absolutely confidential matters from the public and undertake secret investigations. It’s existence vastly unknown to the organization, only few know any of the specific work contents or the composing members, with such an obscure cover many dubiously dub it the ‘darkness of the police department and Mutou’s Criminal Investigation Department First Division especially views them as enemies. How I became the subsection chief of that D Division, was due to a sudden staff reassignment.   

0:40

Sakuma: D Division, you say?

Yuuki: That’s correct.

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PSA

I just want to make sure everyone knows that even small cheap birds come with high costs. Please re-evaluate your budget before getting a birdy! Even budgies will be this costly at a vet. If you think it wont happen to your beeb, I can say Einstein has never once been sick in 9 years until now.

I dont usually get preachy about bird ownership, but I figured this was important enough to share. We now return you to your regularly scheduled birb pictures!

If you think Gravity Falls is the only good cartoon Disney has put out, you really need to get off your high horse and re-evaluate your entire existence. Sit down and watch Phineas and Ferb, The 7D, Wander Over Yonder, Penn Zero, Fish Hooks, and Star Vs The Forces of Evil. Watch every episode of them all. THEN come back and talk.

What is engraved on the film after the meeting of 2 geniuses

There is a photo of Kyo (DIR EN GREY, sukekiyo) taken for and published in this month issue of “Da Vinci”. Published photo belongs to the famous series of Araki Nobuyoshi “Men - bare face by Araki”. He started shooting portraits of actors, artists and sportsmen such as Beat Takeshi or Sadaharu Oh, starting from 1997 having now over 200 people. Taking a simple black and white photo of each person, this series received high evaluations for the overflowing energy that lets out the inner side of people.

A photo shoot that was held in the beginning of September in a studio in Tokyo. When Kyo arrived in the studio Araki soon pointed to the tattoo of the Noh mask on his right elbow: “that’s a beauty”. Then Araki, who liked not only the tattoo on Kyo’s arm but also the others on his neck and back all having various meanings, said “let’s try to shoot them right now” and shooting started no longer than 5 minutes after they met.

Totally empty white studio. In the era of the overflowing digital cameras being used, Araki continued to press the shutter of his seasoned analog camera like he wanted to cut the space itself. Usually shooting for this series is finished within few minutes, but it seemed like Araki liked Kyo as his subject and took longer taking photos.

Hattori Miho that is in charge of this corner of the magazine commented on the shooting: “even saying bare face, it;s not an exposing photo, Araki respects what person wants to express and he shoots that. That’s probably why he was so particular about shooting Kyo’s tattoo that are the form of his expression.”

Also, sukekiyo’s latest mini-album “VITIUM” was brought to the studio, Araki actually listened to it before the photo shoot and upon seeing the CD he praised sukekiyo for its decadent feel: “this one! it’s nice and erotic. Lately there are no works with such atmosphere”.

A single photo taken by the genius Araki of Kyo, not as of a musician, but as of a man, is included in the November Issue of “Da Vinci”