hibiscus family

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Alcea rosea is in the hibiscus family Malvaceae. Commonly known as hollyhock, it is native to southwest Asia, but has become naturalized throughout temperate parts of the world. Hollyhock is a perennial shrub that can grow over 8 feet tall, and produces large showy flowers in the axils of the leaves. For centuries, hollyhock has been planted ornamentally, with hundreds of varieties available for cultivation that range in size and flower color. Aside from its ornamental use, hollyhock has a history of use medicinally as a moisturizer, and to cure inflammation.

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Urena lobata is in the hibiscus family Malvaceae. Commonly known as Ceasar’s Weed, it is a pantropical weed found in both the northern and southern hemisphere. While the native range of this species is not known, many botanists consider species found in Southeast Asia its closest relatives. This plant is cultivated for fiber in many parts of the world including Brazil, India, and the Philippines. Most parts of the plant are used medicinally; the root can be used to treat nausea, while the leaves can be used to make a tea to soothe the throat. Caesar’s Weed grows in disturbed areas and has burs on the fruit that cling to fur and aid in dispersal.

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Pavonia multiflora is in the hibiscus family Malvaceae. Commonly known as Brazilian Candles, it is native to Brazil and other parts of South America. Living up to its name, this plant can produce flowers all year round. The bright pink bracts surround the true petals which stay wrapped around the stamens and pistil, creating a unique floral display unlike many other species! Follow for more plant facts and photos!

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Dombeya burgessiae is in the hibiscus family Malvaceae. Plants in this genus are native to Eastern Africa, including Tanzania, and some species can also be found in Madagascar. This species is also commonly known as Tropical Hydrangea, due to the similarity of the flowers, although they are not closely related. Since hydrangeas generally don’t do well in more tropical climates, many people have planted this species instead for its beautiful inflorescences! Follow for more plant facts and photos!