herzfelde

“Excavation of Persepolis (Iran): Gate of All Lands, Colossal Sculptures Depicting Man-Bulls: View before Excavation, Looking North-West”

1923-1928

glass negative from the Ernst Herzfeld Papers

Freer and Sackler Galleries

“Excavation of Persepolis (Iran): Throne Hall, Southern Wall, West Jamb of Western Doorway: View of Uppermost Register Picturing Enthroned King Giving Audience under the Winged Symbol with Partly Encircled Figure of Ahuramazda”

1923-1928

glass negative from the Ernst Herzfeld Papers

Freer and Sackler Archives

“Excavation of Persepolis (Iran): Tripylon (Council Hall), Main Hall, West Jamb of Southern Doorway: Detail View of Relief Picturing Winged Symbol of Ahuramazda”

1923-1928

glass negative from the Ernst Herzfeld Papers

Freer and Sackler Archives

3

The streets of Ottoman Damascus, ca. 1908-1914

Photographed by archaeologist and Near Eastern scholar Ernst Herzfeld: the entrance to the 13th century Adiliyya Madrasa, and two views of a street in Salihiya - note the wires.

In the Freer/Sackler Archives: FSA A.6 04.GN.3640; FSA A.6 04.GN.2833; FSA A.6 04.GN.2824

« And, indeed, as he listened to the cries of joy rising from the town, Rieux remembered that such joy is always imperiled. He knew what those jubilant crowds did not know but could have learned from books: that the plague bacillus never dies or disappears for good; that it can lie dormant for years and years in furniture and linen-chests; that it bides its time in bedrooms, cellars, trunks, and bookshelves; and that perhaps the day would come when, for the bane and the enlightening of men, it roused up its rats again and sent them forth to die in a happy city. »

(Camus, The Plague-1947)

Photo: John Heartfield, Self Portrait (1920)