herringbone wool

The Trad also known as the New Englander, the professor.

Dress code: Tweed blazers, button-down oxford-cloth shirts, rumpled khaki chinos.

First known sighting: The original J. Press shop in New Haven, Connecticut, 1902.

Recent sighting: Hipster coffee shop near you.

Hall of Famers: Miles Davis, George Plimpton, John Updike.

Signature accessory: Knit tie.

Bragging rights: Wearing the same pair of khakis for fifteen years.

Cause for stress: Hole in the crotch of said khakis.

Pickup line: “I like your cardigan.”

Favourite book: The Stories of John Cheever.

On his iPod: Talking Heads.

In his driveway: 1983 Mercedes Benz S-Series.

In his closet: Three-button wool herringbone blazer ($265) by J. Crew; cotton shirt ($30) by L.L. Bean; cotton tie ($95) by Gant; cotton trousers ($98) by Dockers; leather belt ($45) by J. Press; glasses ($405) by Tom Ford.

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Wednesday fall fashion lay-down
~ Cashmere blue check jacket by Brunello Cucinelli
~ Red\Gray shirt by ISAIA
~ Red wool herringbone tie by Eton Shirts
~ Red paisley\polka dot picket square by Brunello Cucinelli
~ Red croc resin print pen by Faber-Castell
~ Navy cargo trousers by Brunello Cucinelli
~ Black pebble grain double monk shoe by Scarpe di Bianco

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WHO AND WHAT IS TAILOR CAID


Tailor CAID is Yamamoto-san, a master tailor based in Tokyo, who specializes in American Ivy Style (think Mad Men) but is also very capable of other styles. He is a bespoke tailor in the truest sense of the word, tweaking every detail specifically for each individual customer. He excels in creating drape in the chest of his garments, bringing every jacket to life.


I shot some photos to illustrate the gamut of what Yamamoto-san can do:


On the left, an American Ivy Style three button suit. It features a slim lapel, straight, cutaway quarters and a soft shoulder. It has no darts in the body, making the silhouette  This particular suit was made in a royal blue herringbone. This suit is designed for business use, eschewing sporty details, such as swelled edges at the lapel, and keeping it simple.


Second from left, an American Ivy Style three button suit but made-up in a much sportier cloth and with details to match. The cloth is a very textured grey herringbone tweed. The lapels, while the same size as the business suit from earlier, have swelled edges and the pockets are done as patches with flaps. The suit is great for everyday use and the jacket and vest can be split off for use on their own in more casual outfits with denim or odd trousers.


In the center, a 30’s style peak lapelled suit. It has wide, straight lapels with a large collar. The chest is draped and there are darts in the body, giving a very defined silhouette. The cloth is a medium weight wool mohair in navy. It is a perfect suit for occasions and events.


Second from the right, is another 30’s style, known as the “paddock jacket”, later popularized by John F Kennedy. Paddock jackets are two button jackets with both buttons designed to be buttoned at the same time, rather than the commonly seen middle button only configuration. The cloth is an unusual design, a country pattern but in cooler, city colours.


All the way to the right is a suit in the same configuration as the grey herringbone tweed but in an aubergine wool/cashmere mix. The jacket was done as a typical sport jacket, with swelled edges and patch with flap pockets. The jacket alone could be worn very beautifully with grey flannel trousers. Not the most practical suit in the world, but certainly unusual and beautiful in its own way, as you’d expect from bespoke!


Tailor CAID’s overcoat is distinctive as well, based on the box coat from the 50’s. It features distinctive details such as swelled edges, a forward-set ticket pocket and turnback cuffs. The length extends to below the knee. It is a dramatic coat, beautiful in motion. It works well as a casual coat in heavy tweeds as pictured or it could be a serious workhorse in navy wool herringbone.


TRUNK SHOW AT THE ARMOURY NYC SEP 15 - 17

APPOINTMENTS CAN BE MADE AT TRIBECA@THEARMOURY.COM

Engineered Garments - Jacket

Gitman Vintage - Shirt

Anvil - T-Shirt

Apolis - Hat

Independence - Scarf

Fox River Mills - Socks

Oak Street Bootmakers - Boots

Makr - Bag

Winter Wool

Warm up in the nicest wool-blend clothing

Wool clothes are the nuts and bolts of winter style. We’re not talking about that itchy holiday sweater that you never actually wear, but thick, soft basics that heat you up and keep you comfortable. The key is finding a balance - look for items that are made predominantly from wool and mixed with materials like cotton and linen for a smoother texture. We searched our site to find you the best wool-blend coats, jackets, sweaters and pants from high street brands and designers alike. Scroll through our selection below and welcome wool into your winter rotation.

Search tip: You can search for specific materials and styles on Wantering by typing in keywords like cotton or cashmere. Shop more men’s wool clothing and accessories here.

Matthias Cornilleau of Stylnox wearing a wool Acne Studios coat

Shop Wool Clothing

ASOS Wool Overcoat

Supply Jacket Shawl Collar

Faux Shearling-Trimmed Wool-Felt Jacket

Mire Coat

ASOS Slim Fit Suit Jacket In Tweed

Asymmetrical Biker Jacket

Grey Slim-Fit Herringbone Wool-Tweed Suit Jacket

Wallace & Barnes boiled wool sweater-jacket

Vintage Marled Rugby Stripe Wool Blend Sweater

Merino Wool Fair Isle Snowflake Crewneck Sweater


Paul Smith Knitwear - Red Oversized-Check Jacquard Mohair-Blend Sweater

Paul Smith Knitwear - Taupe Shawl Collar Merino-Wool Cardigan

Suede-Trimmed Zipped Wool Sweater

Seth Wool Jogger

Brown Slim-Fit Checked Wool Suit Trousers

Drawstring tailored wool trousers

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Tailored Trends: Solaro cloth

The Italians have a knack for taking British practicality and giving it the break in context and breakup in color needed to make it casual. half the weight, twice the color, you get the idea…

This summer, from Florence to Paris, Solero cloth was on the backs of some of the world’s most sharply tailored men. (Eduardo Ristori, Alan See, Khaled Nasr…) Originally an attempt by British mills to create a more tropical cloth than khaki for British forces serving in arid environs, the addition of subtle weaves of red and green gave the cloth a reflective quality.

The success of Solaro cloth against heat is questionable, but its iridescent sheen of red, green and coral in the sun, imbues it with more character than khaki. And the wool herringbone weave drapes beautifully, unlike cotton khaki, which, in the sun, looks like a traffic accident.