heroes of origin

First time at the dorms

Bakugou: Shitty-hair, are you here?

Kirishima: *raises hand*

Bakugou: Didn’t recognize you with your hair down. And uh is Pikachu here?

Kaminari: *raises hand*

Bakugou: Ah. Didn’t recognize you with your mouth shut.

I love how the further Dragon Age progresses as a series, the more retroactively badass everything the warden did in the first game becomes.

I mean, the guy you pulled out of a cage can become the freaking Arishok. That odd woman you meet in the tavern and decide to bring along can become Divine Victoria. Alistair can be king. That witch who turned into a dragon when you fought her was actually an ancient elven god. If we count Dragon!Andraste and the arch demon, that’s three potential dragon gods you can kill in that game.

You manage to resolve tense political situations that would take other groups months of efforts and tons of diplomatic resources and military presence with just yourself, your colourful band of misfit/murderous companions, and your dog. In under a year. 

You can even make friends with one of those insane darkspawn magisters that almost destroys the world in DA:I. Just like, palling around with him. Swapping notes. Doing trust building exercises while everyone else is losing their shit over Corypheus.

And it’s just hilarious because the Hero of Ferelden is this person who some of the most powerful individuals in Thedas will actually fall in line behind, this ridiculously competent and influential figure who solves world-ending problems like they’re Sunday morning crosswords, and it’s going to be useless in the coming crisis because they can’t bring the warden back.

Anakin…exists relative to the state of the galaxy. He is not Luke, he is not the youth of western literature on a journey; that is Luke’s role. Anakin’s role is that of the demi-god of Greek and Roman origin. When Anakin rises, the galaxy rises with him, when Anakin is in turmoil, the galaxy is in turmoil, when Anakin falls, so falls the galaxy. Anakin is intrinsic to the galaxy because Anakin, like so many other mythological demi-gods, is an avatar for the gods or, in the case of Star Wars, the Force. Regardless of any one person’s views on the Force (which are extremely disparate and widely varied, so we won’t broach that subject here), this fact is indisputable. Anakin, as the Chosen One who will “bring balance to the Force”, is its avatar. When Anakin is claimed by the Dark, the Jedi Order’s zenith is reached, the Balance is tipped, and the Order descends into darkness with Anakin, just as his return also signals theirs. 

The title ‘Return of the Jedi’ doesn’t just reference Luke becoming a Jedi, but Anakin’s return to the Light, and with it, the ability for the Jedi Order to once more flourish. In this he is much like Beowulf, when the Geatish hero sacrifices himself to defeat the dragon at the end of the epic poem. Failure would spell ultimate destruction for Beowulf’s people and country, just as, had Anakin failed to destroy the Emperor, the Jedi and the galaxy would truly have been wiped out. Anakin himself has to die, however, because he is what tips the scales. Once he dies and becomes one with the Force, only then is balance restored.

— 

‘STAR WARS: The Creation of a Modern Myth: Cultural Influence, Fan Response and the Impact of Literary Archetypes on Saga Perception’ 

(via muldertorture)

This right here is absolutely fundamental to understanding the entire purpose of the Skywalker saga, as Lucas so painstakingly told it. The destruction of the old Jedi Order that had ‘lost its way’ and forgotten its true role in the galaxy, and the founding of the New, heralded by Anakin’s return to the Light, and Luke’s essential role in reminding him—and us all—of what it means to be a True Jedi.

I really love the dialogue you can have with Warden Alistair in Inquisition. like, yeah, he sounds a little frustrated and angry every time someone asks him about the Blight, but it makes sense? like, he’s hearing the Calling, every Grey Wardens nightmare (literally!), he’s watching the Order that he loves basically destroy itself after 10 years of trying to rebuild, and people are still asking him about the Blight.

ignoring that he’s probably got some serious PTSD from that whole time (being one of only two survivors, facing a fucking archdemon, all the horrible things they witnessed along the way, etc), I probably wouldn’t care much about what happened ten years ago if there was an evil Magister wreaking havoc.

but then the dialogue you get from a Warden Alistair that was romanced by a living Hero of Ferelden

his entire demeanor shifts when you ask him about the Hero of Ferelden. his voice loses the edge, he gets a little quieter, and he talks about her with every bit of emotion he did in Origins.

like, no, he doesn’t want to talk about the Blight and all of the horrible things that happened to him (and his friends and the woman he loved and his brother and his father figure) and he has no problem making that known, but he could talk about the love of his life for hours with the same bit of happiness he had before

idk, I keep thinking about that and honestly it just makes me really happy