hero falls

8

Dana Andrews trying to keep it together and not succeeding in Laura (1944)

fandoms doing their thing
  • naruto fandom: yelling about which female character is the worstest
  • bleach fandom: angrily hissing at themselves and each other and being super salty over really little things
  • one piece fandom: sobbing into a pillow about whatever the hell's going on with sanji
  • fairy tail fandom: alternating between which ship they feel like fighting about and getting angry at cleavage
  • attack on titan fandom: explodes once a month in a burst of glory before immediately forgetting it ever existed
  • steven universe fandom: everything is problematic except what i like
  • jojo's bizarre adventure fandom: spent the last 29 years trying to figure out the plot; still hasn't gotten anywhere
  • yuri!!! on ice fandom: so gay very homosexual much wow
  • gravity falls fandom: slowly sinking into an existential crisis (possibly five existential crises)
  • my hero academia fandom: anxiously quadruple-checking saisai-chan's blog to see if there's anything new
  • yu-gi-oh! fandom: probably still confused about pot of greed??? idk lots of memes about hair
  • puella magi madoka magica fandom: crying about gays
  • ouran high chool host club fandom: pressed up against the window like creepers but no one notices
  • fullmetal alchemist fandom: but is it legal in japan????? no??? how about germany????? how about germany in 1912?????
  • pokémon fandom: still trying to catch 'em all
  • danganronpa fandom: all your faves are dead
  • game of thrones fandom: all your faves are dead or suffering
  • lord of the rings fandom: may or may not have ceased to exist altogether
  • doctor who fandom: hiding from the supernatural and sherlock fandoms
  • supernatural fandom: hiding from the sherlock and doctor who fandoms
  • sherlock fandom: hiding from the doctor who and supernatural fandoms
  • superwholock fandoms: sitting in a dark room, rubbing their hands together, and giggling maniacally
  • harry potter fandom: desperately awaiting the sweet release of death (or the next fantastic beasts movie)
  • hayao miyazaki fandom: anime was a mistake
  • voltron fandom: obsessing over keith, lance, klance, pidge's gender identity, shiro's ptsd, and allura's allura
  • rwby fandom: watching the bumbleby and black sun fans viciously circling each other like angry coyotes
  • dragon ball fandom: very tired at this point
  • abridged fandom: y u no update
  • star vs. the forces of evil fandom: the most passive aggressive ship warring i've ever seen tbh
  • avatar fandom: still bitching about zutara and makkora i guess idk
  • buffy the vampire slayer fandom: peering out from behind trees, probably waiting for the sun to sink
  • avengers fandom: either bickering about tony stark, screaming at sharon carter's existence, or dead inside
  • durarara!! fandom: fuck fascinating characters, development, and story; i want unhealthy gays
  • baccano! fandom: softly sobbing in the distance
  • warrior cats fandom: trying to pretend they never existed to begin with
  • rick riordan fandom: has either read every single thing he's ever written or gave up years ago
  • rave master fandom: sniggering as the fairy tail fandom loses its shit again
  • twilight fandom: rewriting the series so it doesn't suck as much and/or making cactus jokes
  • over the garden wall fandom: listening to "into the unknown" and sobbing
  • discworld fandom: secure in their superior sense of humor but sad because a great man has left us
  • a series of unfortunate events fandom: aggressively glowering at anything related to the movie
  • seven deadly sins fandom: confused af right now
  • vamp! fandom: has the best vampires ever created and fucking knows it
  • seraph of the end fandom: thinks they have the best vampires ever created (and are incorrect bc vamp! exists)
  • his dark materials fandom: making dæmons for themselves, their ocs, and literally anybody
  • star trek fandom: speaking in kling-on or whatever
  • star wars fandom: kylo ren discourse
  • miraculous ladybug fandom: arguing over which of four ships is the best even though they're all the same two people
  • thomas sanders fandom: deeply in love with thomas sanders bc it's really hard not to be
Creating a Character Arc for D&D

So I saw someone ask a question that I myself have asked before. I have seen the problem take place all the time with no one really knowing what the problem is and whether or how to fix it. That question was:

How do I make a character that I won’t get bored with?

I have often seen people make characters that seem really cool and badass and have plenty of backstory and are incomparably unique. Yet, they will get bored of it after a session or two and want to kill off their special character to make a new one. This will go on with people making new characters and never getting attached to one. The solution to the problem is complex with many intricacies, but the main focus of the problem for many people, I think, is that their character has no story.

Creating a Character with a Story

A story, when referring to a character, is how that character changes over time; their character arc. D&D 5e tries to solve this by forcing players to choose aspects of their character background including their character’s traits, flaws, ideals, and bonds. This is all well and dandy, but this alone won’t define a character arc. To create a character arc, figure out how you want your character’s story to begin and how it should end using those four background characteristics.

Traits: A character’s traits could change over time. They don’t have to, but it can create an interesting character. Traits make a character who they are, and in an RPG it is often a reflection of the player. So while traits can change, I would probably suggest to change a flaw, ideal, or bond before a trait.

  • A trait could become more specific, like from “angry” to “vengeful” once they understand why they are angry. Think of the trait as evolving.
  • A trait could disappear or be replaced after some moral turning point, like a callous character becoming guilt-ridden or even benevolent after they see the sort of pain they have caused firsthand.
  • A trait can become reinforced or strengthened based on their decisions. An antihero’s traits would likely follow this route. “Do you see what happens when you trust people? They betray you!”

Flaws: A flawed character is a great character, but a character arc involves a person being confronted by their flaws. Their flaws directly oppose their goal. When faced by their flaws, they either choose to suffer their flaw or overcome it. This is why sequels are usually terrible. A character that heroically overcame its flaw in the first movie is now un-flawed. Be aware of this in an RPG. The character should always have a flaw, even after overcoming a flaw. The only time they should ever NOT be flawed is at the very end of a campaign, facing off against the main antagonist, using all they have learned on their heroic journey.

  • A flaw could be worsened. Usually a good early option in a character’s arc, as things seem bleaker and bleaker for your character until they manage to overcome the flaw later in the game’s story.
  • A flaw could evolve or become more specific, much like a trait.
  • A flaw can disappear or be replaced, especially later in the story once it has been challenged by the game’s story.

Ideals: A character’s ideal is what they believe in. Maybe it’s a religion, moral code, or instinct. A character’s ideal is a great concept that can change in a game. This is where you see tragic falls from hero to villain or redemption arcs from villain to hero. In an RPG, a good player will have strong ideals and a good GM will recognize those ideals and challenge them. This is the moral quandary, and it’s the player’s job to identify it and make a choice that will affect their character forever. Changing an ideal should always be some sort of turning point in a story.

Bonds: A character’s bonds in D&D 5e are their ties to the in-game world. It’s a fabulous definition because it’s sort of like asking “why are you playing this character?” right to your face. If your character has a family, then your character probably cares for them. Or not. If your character had a mentor, you are probably on a sort of hero’s journey from nobody to somebody. If you have no ties to any person in the game world then you are (or should be) finding a reason to belong, maybe a team of other heroes, perhaps? Your bond can affect how your ideals, flaws, and traits change, and they can change your bonds, in turn. Your character makes new memories, meets new people, and experiences new things all the time.


Update all of these things at the end of every session. Whether or not they ended up changing that day, making a habit of checking each session will keep you invested in your character and help to create a character arc. In addition, know where your character begins their arc and how it will end. Talk with the DM about your plans, and they should add some moral and character quandaries to test your character’s… character!

Examples of Character Arcs

Coming of Age: The character begins the game morally or psychologically immature or inexperienced. They grow into a more mature and experienced character by the end of the campaign. A ridiculously blunt way to put it is going from an angsty teen to a true hero. Such an angsty teen could be either a rebellious murder hobo or a distant brooding loner that when a turning point happens, they grow a moral backbone and answer the call to action. Look at Spirited Away, Dead Poets Society, or The Karate Kid.

Redemption: The character begins as a legit villain with evil intentions but finds a reason to change their ways after a turning point. Maybe they find a moral line they won’t cross and then start to wonder if what they have been doing all along is right. The character is not truly redeemed until other players and other people see them as a changed person, which should finally happen at the end of the campaign. Look at Wikus in District 9, Oskar Schindler in Schindler’s List, or Prince Zuko from Avatar, the Last Airbender.

Disillusionment: The character believes in one thing at the beginning of the campaign but slowly discovers that what they believe in is morally wrong, utterly pointless, or a flat-out lie. They may go back and forth between believes a few times before making a transition, or they might be in denial. But by the end of the campaign they have realized the true path. Look at movies like Office Space, The Truman Show, Conspiracy Theory, or Fight Club.

Tragic Fall: The character follows the hero’s journey only to make the wrong choice at every turning point. Their morality comes into question, and they just don’t have it in them to change or become a hero, usually thanks to a “fatal flaw.” At the end of the campaign, this character should either retire, die, or be killed by their flaw to be a true tragedy. Look at Hamlet, Tom Powers in The Public Enemy, and McMurphy in One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.

Corruption: Unlike the tragic fall, this character is not destined to die. They are destined to become a villain. Rather than refuse a call to action, they have moral quandaries which they make the right choice at first, but then they start to question their choices. They start to think evil is easier or better than good. Then they start making the wrong choices and eventually join or become the villain they were trying to stop in the first place. Look at Anakin Skywalker in Star Wars, Michael Corleone in The Godfather, or Harvey Dent in The Dark Knight.

Cynic to Participant: This character is a loner and cynic and is miserable because of it. They eventually realize that they cannot accomplish what they set out to do without help. They become less selfish and more cooperative with the rest of the adventuring party. Look at The Incredibles, every buddy cop movie where the buddies don’t get along, and every Batman team-up ever.


These are the more common character arcs, but there are plenty of different changes that your character can go through to grow, change, or fall over the course of a D&D campaign. Again, talk with your DM about where you are starting and where you want to end up. That way they can insert those pivotal turning points and put pressure on your flaws and ideals!

Need to follow more blogs that like: 
Animes/cartoons
- Haikyuu!!
- Yuri on ice!!!
- Tokyo Ghoul
- Free! 
- Kuroko no Basket
- Barakamon
- Boku no hero academia
- Gekkan Shoujo Nozaki-kun
- Karneval
- Voltron
- Star vs. the forces of evil
- Gravity falls
- Shingeki no kyojin
- Boku dake ga inai machi
-  Watashi ga Motete Dousunda
- No.6

Ships
- I W A O I
- Kagehina
- Kuroken
- Ushiten
- Victuuri
- Leoji ( Leo de la Iglesia x Guang Hong Ji )
- Makoharu
- Midotaka
- Kagakuro
- Aokise
- B A K U D E K U (!!!)
- Tododeku
- Yoreki
- Garenai
- K L A N C E 
- Starco
- E R E J E A N
- Mutsumi x Serinuma
- Shima x Serinuma
- Nezushi

So follow/reblog/like if you blog about any of that

Anakin…exists relative to the state of the galaxy. He is not Luke, he is not the youth of western literature on a journey; that is Luke’s role. Anakin’s role is that of the demi-god of Greek and Roman origin. When Anakin rises, the galaxy rises with him, when Anakin is in turmoil, the galaxy is in turmoil, when Anakin falls, so falls the galaxy. Anakin is intrinsic to the galaxy because Anakin, like so many other mythological demi-gods, is an avatar for the gods or, in the case of Star Wars, the Force. Regardless of any one person’s views on the Force (which are extremely disparate and widely varied, so we won’t broach that subject here), this fact is indisputable. Anakin, as the Chosen One who will “bring balance to the Force”, is its avatar. When Anakin is claimed by the Dark, the Jedi Order’s zenith is reached, the Balance is tipped, and the Order descends into darkness with Anakin, just as his return also signals theirs. 

The title ‘Return of the Jedi’ doesn’t just reference Luke becoming a Jedi, but Anakin’s return to the Light, and with it, the ability for the Jedi Order to once more flourish. In this he is much like Beowulf, when the Geatish hero sacrifices himself to defeat the dragon at the end of the epic poem. Failure would spell ultimate destruction for Beowulf’s people and country, just as, had Anakin failed to destroy the Emperor, the Jedi and the galaxy would truly have been wiped out. Anakin himself has to die, however, because he is what tips the scales. Once he dies and becomes one with the Force, only then is balance restored.

— 

‘STAR WARS: The Creation of a Modern Myth: Cultural Influence, Fan Response and the Impact of Literary Archetypes on Saga Perception’ 

(via muldertorture)

This right here is absolutely fundamental to understanding the entire purpose of the Skywalker saga, as Lucas so painstakingly told it. The destruction of the old Jedi Order that had ‘lost its way’ and forgotten its true role in the galaxy, and the founding of the New, heralded by Anakin’s return to the Light, and Luke’s essential role in reminding him—and us all—of what it means to be a True Jedi.

5

The Revelation™

Fandom Cinnamon Rolls
  • Steven Universe: PROTECT STEVEN
  • Gravity Falls: PROTECT DIPPER
  • Over the Garden Wall: PROTECT GREG
  • Adventure Time: PROTECT MARCELINE
  • Rick and Morty: PROTECT MORTY
  • Assassination Classroom: PROTECT NAGISA
  • My Hero Academia: PROTECT MIDORIYA
  • Kekkai Sensen: PROTECT MARY
  • One Punch Man: PROTECT GENOS
  • Ouran High School Host Club: PROTECT HARUHI
  • Bungou Stray Dogs: PROTECT ATSUSHI
  • Undertale: PROTECT EVERY SPECIES EXCEPT THE FLOWER
  • Mom: sweety I've noticed you've been watching a lot of kids TV shows, are you ok? Why don't you go out with your friends?
  • Me: I'm sorry mom but this is my life now

I’m Done! :)

Finnnnnnnallly i can finish it! ( ^ O ^ )/

I cann’tt write down in words, to express the joy I feel this…..

do you like Gravity Falls as like me too?~ That’s make me excited ^ ^

Tanoshii yo~ but, my English is not very good….. T_T

Zan’nen desu ne~