heritage witchcraft

Things that make me feel witchy

Films

Coraline

Corpse Bride

Beetlejuice

Alice in Wonderland (IDEK why)

Books

Anything by Terry Pratchett!

The Raven Cycle by Maggie Stiefvater (seriously, read these books omg)

TOLKIEN!

Anything written in an old, or antique book. I have a version of the Arabian Nights from 1907 (it was my great grandad’s) and it’s beautiful.

Random Stuff

Taking a walk after it’s rained

Hearing crows

Graveyards at night

Old castles or houses (if you’re in England get an English Heritage subscription, and a National Trust one if you can. Cheap/ sometimes free entry into HUGE grounds and historical places.

Tea in a cup and saucer from a tea pot

Antique shops

Thunderstorms

Listening to people speaking gaelic (especially my dad, he has the perfect Irish accent it’s great)

Old Libraries (have you seen the one in York?????? I mean look at this!!!!!

people in York should be happy af. 

Pale white witch bitch with black hair dyed green
Black lipstick seeps through the cracks in your mouth, green juice lingers on your tongue
Burn sage to black, claw your painted fingernails, clutch your crystals:
No amount of colour will exorcise the white from your feminism.
Do not cross into the realm where our fires burn and cauldrons bubble
We have no @smallspells of your new age
Our potions we uphold through millennia
Halud and badam, cinnamon and cardamom
Thick sweet moon milk drips from our yellow-stained lips.

Poem by Urvija Banerji

Illustration by Christina Chung

Okay witches, check this out: It is totally fine to learn from and appreciate other cultures and practices, but not okay to appropriate them. Like, maybe a Native American shaman can teach you how to perform a proper smudging, but that doesn’t mean you can call on their ancestors to help you out. Like, you got your own ancestors; use them. Maybe a Voodoo practitioner can teach how to make a gris gris bag, but that doesn’t mean you know how to contact their deities and show them the proper respect. The point I’m trying to make is that you can appreciate without appropriating. Just respect the cultures and heritage of other people.

5

February 2015 : Altar

So I decided I would stop torturing you lovely people with awful potato quality photos via my ipod, and crack out the actual camera for an actually nice photo of the altar. 

I’m leaving for home for a week so I often clean the altar up abit. This time I moved things around, and I actually got around to taking photos of the candle sticks I painted, with the “Abundance & Beginnings” sigils.

I didn’t want to leave any food offerings so I left some dried ones as well as a couple pieces of jewelry that I want to sort of “stew’ there. 

So breaking it down, some of the new stuff you see is the little glass skulls holding the Juniper and Rowan, and my "Old horn” which was a branch / root that my sister gave to me, which I’ve been using in place of a stang ( as the one I have is not here and is far to large for convenience ). Then I’ve got my grandfathers knife, a bell, and moth over in the corner there. ( Still no eyes yet :( but I’m hoping to find some suitable ones soon ).

Anyways, thanks for showing interest and appreciation when it comes to my altar. I know I’m quiet happy with it, even if it comes off as a bit flashy. 

anonymous asked:

Where did you study fairy faith?

I started in university in Celtic Studies which was the focus of my Cultural And Historical Studies BA. I officially dedicated myself to fairy faith in 2001 before that I had just done the simple magic my family taught me since I was little and the stuff that had been happening with my familiar since my early teens.

Then I studied directly with RJ Stewart in his Faery Tradition workshops as well as of course reading his books. RJ introduced me to powerful fairy allies and helped me connect more with my familiar although I still didn’t understand it’s nature.

Around the same time I did an online program Heritage Witchcraft. This is where I really learned the nature of my familiar in depth as the familiar is the focus of this tradition. I completed the HWA program and was initiated–it is a dual observance Quaker and Fairy Faith focused American tradition which matches my heritage.

However, my main focus the last several years is apprenticing with a teacher in the Feri tradition, another American dual observance witch tradition. Feri is a tradition that takes many years to prepare for initiation, so I am still just a beginner in that training. I am working on a more detailed post about that, but it’s gonna take while to finish writing it.

A witch without a heritage

What is witchcraft? I feel like for many it’s closely related to their roots. They find their inner strength somewhere in their heritage and draw power from it.

As many of you know, I am European. Belgian to be exact. And I feel like I am powerless in this way. There is no such thing as Belgian culture or Belgian heritage. Hardly anything to draw power from. When I think about this country the word that comes to mind is ‘bland’. Nothing stands out.

I am jealous of all those witches that draw power from their heritage. It feels like they are always backed up by hundreds of years of experience and knowledge.
Something I don’t get to experience.

Of course, I can start digging into my family history. I’ll find ancestors that branch of from countries that have more cultural value. But doing that would feel like appropriation? So i try to steer away from that.

Don’t worry, I’ll get there. I’ll find ways to channel forces that exceed my human limitations. But how wonderful it would be if I could tap into some ancestral channels…

Im sorry if this sounds like white tears. It probably does.

What is Fairy Faith?

Fairy Faith are folkloric traditions and practices that interact with an enchanted class of creatures that live in a realm connected to ours with some cross over between.

People of most any religious or even an areligious belief system can practice fairy faith.

A partial list of fairy faith tradtions and well known teachers and authors regarding:

  • Feri Witchcraft (Victor and Cora Anderson, T Thorn Coyle’s-early work) 
  • Pop Culture Fairy Faith (Brian Froud, Amy Brown …)
  • UnderWorld Faery Traditions (RJ Stewart and Orion Foxwood)
  • Heritage Witchcraft (Ari Devi and Grayson Magnus)
  • Cornish Pellars (Gemma Gary and Jackdaw)
  • Folklore based traditions 
  • Sabbatic Witchcraft (Daniel Schulke and Nigel Jackson’s early work)

So, what exactly does Fairy Faith involve?

To put it simply, it involves fairies. Some traditions focus solely on fairies, but others may only have fairies as a part of a greater number of beliefs and practices. 

An important note to make is that a Fairy Faith isn’t always in itself a religious practice. There are traditions that incorporate Fae into their magical practices or every day lives in a non-religious way. It may also be incorporated into other religious practices and beliefs as well.

Faith:

1. complete trust or confidence in someone or something.”this restores one’s faith in politicians”

2. strong belief in God or in the doctrines of a religion, based on spiritual apprehension rather than proof.

3. a system of religious belief.plural noun: faiths

“the Christian faith”

4. a strongly held belief or theory.

Fairy faiths and practices differ from specific tradition and individual/group. Some focus heavily on the teachings from historical folklore and books (such as The Fairy-Faith in Celtic Countries by W.Y. Evans-Wentz), while others focus on the personal experiences and teachings they learn from their interactions with the Fae. And others continue living traditions of Fairy Faith going back generations.

——-

A special thanks to spiritscraft​ for taking the time to help edit this short article <3 

skychord  asked:

What's fairy faith? It sounds pretty cool

fairy faith

Fairy Faith are folkloric traditions and practices that interact with an enchanted class of creatures that live in a realm connected to ours with some cross over between.

People of most any religious or even an areligious belief system can practice fairy faith.

A partial list of fairy faith tradtions and well known teachers and authors regarding:

  • Feri Witchcraft (Victor and Cora Anderson, T Thorn Coyle’s-early work) 
  • “Pop Culture” Modern Folkloer Fairy Faith (Brian Froud, Amy Brown …)
  • UnderWorld Faery Traditions (RJ Stewart and Orion Foxwood)
  • Heritage Witchcraft (Ari Devi and Grayson Magnus)
  • Cornish Pellars (Gemma Gary and Jackdaw)
  • Folklore based traditions (Morgan Daimler)
  • Sabbatic Witchcraft (Daniel Schulke and Nigel Jackson’s early work)

So, what exactly does Fairy Faith involve?

To put it simply, it involves fairies. Some traditions focus solely on fairies, but others may only have fairies as a part of a greater number of beliefs and practices. 

An important note to make is that a Fairy Faith isn’t always in itself a religious practice. There are traditions that incorporate Fae into their magical practices or every day lives in a non-religious way. It may also be incorporated into other religious practices and beliefs as well.

Faith:

1. complete trust or confidence in someone or something.”this restores one’s faith in politicians”

2. strong belief in God or in the doctrines of a religion, based on spiritual apprehension rather than proof.

3. a system of religious belief.plural noun: faiths

“the Christian faith”

4. a strongly held belief or theory.

Fairy faiths and practices differ from specific tradition and individual/group. Some focus heavily on the teachings from historical folklore and books (such as The Fairy-Faith in Celtic Countries by W.Y. Evans-Wentz), while others focus on the personal experiences and teachings they learn from their interactions with the Fae. And others continue living traditions of Fairy Faith going back generations.

Imagine #65 Isaac [Requested]

Isaac Lahey had a naïve mindset regarding romance; gratuitous impulse, resolute faith and a covetous yearning. He was an amazing boyfriend; a compassionate heart, impish humor and a prideful inclination to express his devotion. Not a sole member in the gang was surprised by the news that Isaac had fallen smitten with you; his advances merciless and exposed to prying judgments. They were, however, surprised to learn of your Pagan heritage; the practice of witchcraft. They stumbled across the truth on accident, a supernatural brawl detonated the psychological levee, blasting the cerebral barrier to rubble. A wendigo crouch in a defensive demeanor, a rattling hiss evoked a malicious snarl from Isaac; the werewolf’s incandescent golden irises streamlined on the monster feet away as he snapped his fangs at the threat. The scenario was ill-suited; the menace had dominance over the altercation. He had incomprehensible strength, strategic battle methods and a mouth brimming with threatening razor serrated teeth.

Keep reading

How tradition is passed

So of course people enter formal teaching and apprentice relationships and I have done that myself, people join covens to learn and again I have done that too. People read books and practice what the book instructs, that is the passing of a textual tradition we all do that. There is learning from the spirits which is the most vital. But another way we learn is just from each other. We write letters, talk on the phone, chat on fb and reblog and comment on tumblr, meet up and try things, trade tips, look at each other’s Grimoires and copy spells. We are the tradition kids.

Anytime I try something that Ioqayin or Visardistofelphame has written about or meet up with them and do ritual together we are living tradition. We are peers, colleagues and witches, nothing formal is going on here, yet we are the wave of evolving tradition along with everyone else who write and practices in this community. So much if what we are doing is a advancement of the tradition.

According to Cochrane his rituals are done silently, but when we do the treading the mill often we chant something awesome that Ioqayin found in a witch trial and put to melody or that Visardistofelphame wrote or that I learnt from heritage witchcraft or that I wrote. Tradition is what we are building on and keeping going by doing and refining. Will you find our rituals in books? Only the basis of them, everything else comes from the effective spiritual response to our adapting and creating.