herbig haro

Stars and Dust in Corona Australis: Cosmic dust clouds and young, energetic stars inhabit this telescopic vista, less than 500 light-years away toward the northern boundary of Corona Australis, the Southern Crown. The dust clouds effectively block light from more distant background stars in the Milky Way. But the striking complex of reflection nebulae cataloged as NGC 6726, 6727, and IC 4812 produce a characteristic blue color as light from the regions young hot stars is reflected by the cosmic dust. The dust also obscures from view stars still in the process of formation. At the left, smaller yellowish nebula NGC 6729 bends around young variable star R Coronae Australis. Just below it, glowing arcs and loops shocked by outflows from embedded newborn stars are identified as Herbig-Haro objects. On the sky this field of view spans about 1 degree. That corresponds to almost 9 light-years at the estimated distance of the nearby star forming region. via NASA

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Pelican and Herbig Haro 555 in mono by Sara Wager
Via Flickr:
IC5070 (the Pelican nebula) is located in the constellation of Cygnus at approximately 1800 light years from Earth. You can see on the right of the image a large pillar of gas and at the tip of this is a Herbig-Haro object. Herbig-Haro 555 is a narrow jet of gas and matter, ejected by newly born stars at speeds of several hundred kilometres per second. It collides with nearby gas and dust in the interstellar medium, producing bright shock fronts that glow as the gas is heated by friction while the surrounding gas is excited by the high-energy radiation of nearby hot stars. Details: M: Mesu 200 T: TMB152 C: QSI683 WSG with 3nm Ha filter 26x1800s Totalling 13 hours

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Herbig Haro HH24

Pelican Nebula Close Up : The prominent ridge of emission featured in this vivid skyscape is designated IC 5067. Part of a larger emission region with a distinctive shape, popularly called The Pelican Nebula, the ridge spans about 10 light-years and follows the curve of the cosmic pelicans head and neck. Fantastic, dark shapes inhabiting the view are clouds of cool gas and dust sculpted by energetic radiation from young, hot, massive stars. But stars are also forming within the dark shapes. Twin jets emerging from the tip of the long, dark tendril left of center are the telltale signs of an embedded protostar cataloged as Herbig-Haro 555 . In fact, other Herbig-Haro objects indicating the presence of protostars are found within the frame. The Pelican Nebula itself, also known as IC 5070, is about 2,000 light-years away. To find it, look northeast of bright star Deneb in the high flying constellation Cygnus. via NASA

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The Pelican Nebula.

The Pelican Nebula. also known as IC 5070 and IC 5067.  is an H II region associated with the North America Nebula in the constellation Cygnus. The gaseous contortions of this emission nebula bear a resemblance to a pelican, giving rise to its name,The Pelican Nebula is located nearby first magnitude star Deneb, and is divided from its more prominent neighbour, the North America Nebula, by a molecular cloud filled with dark dust.
The Pelican is much studied because it has a particularly active mix of star formation and evolving gas clouds. The light from young energetic stars is slowly transforming cold gas to hot and causing an ionization front gradually to advance outward. Particularly dense filaments of cold gas are seen to still remain, and among these are found two jets emitted from the Herbig–Haro object 555, Millions of years from now this nebula might no longer be known as the Pelican, as the balance and placement of stars and gas will leave something that appears completely different.

Credit : Astronomy site 

What dark structures arise from the Pelican Nebula? Visible as a bird-shaped nebula toward the constellation of a bird (Cygnus, the Swan), the Pelican Nebula is a place dotted with newly formed stars but fouled with dark dust. These smoke-sized dust grains formed in the cool atmospheres of young stars and were dispersed by stellar winds and explosions. Impressive Herbig-Haro jets are seen emitted by a star on the right that is helping to destroy the light year-long dust pillar that contains it. The featured image was scientifically-colored to emphasize light emitted by small amounts of ionized nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur in the nebula made predominantly of hydrogen and helium. The Pelican Nebula (IC 5067 and IC 5070) is about 2,000 light-years away and can be found with a small telescope to the northeast of the bright star Deneb.

Object Names: Pelican Nebula, IC 5067, IC 5070

Imagte Type: Astronomical

Credit: Larry Van Vleet (LVVASTRO)

Time And Space

Sh2-239

The cosmic brush of star formation composed this alluring mix of dust and dark nebulae. Cataloged as Sh2-239 and LDN 1551, the region lies near the southern end of the Taurus molecular cloud complex some 450 light-years distant. Stretching for nearly 3 light-years, the canvas abounds with signs of embedded young stellar objects driving dynamic outflows into the surrounding medium. Included near the center of the frame, a compact, tell-tale red jet of shocked hydrogen gas is near the position of infrared source IRS5, known to be a system of protostars surrounded by dust disks. Just below it are the broader, brighter wings of HH 102, one of the region’s many Herbig-Haro objects, nebulosities associated with newly born stars. Estimates indicate that the star forming LDN 1551 region contains a total amount of material equivalent to about 50 times the mass of the Sun.

Credit: Adam Block

Clouds of stardust drift through this deep skyscape. The cosmic scene spans nearly 2 degrees across the Perseus molecular cloud some 850 light-years away. A triangle of dusty nebulae reflecting light from embedded stars is captured in the telescopic field of view. With a characteristic bluish color reflection nebulaNGC 1333 is at left, vdB13 at bottom right, and rare yellowish reflection nebula vdB12 lies at the top. Stars are forming in the Perseus molecular cloud, though most are obscured at visible wavelengths by the pervasive dust. Still, hints of contrasting red emission from Herbig-Haro objects, the jets and shocked glowing gas emanating from recently formed stars, are evident in NGC 1333. At the estimated distance of the molecular cloud, legs of the triangle formed by the reflection nebulae would be about 20 light-years long.

Image Credit & Copyright: Lorand Fenyes

Time And Space

Galactic Nebula NGC 1999

Just south of the famous Orion Nebula exists one of the most interesting starforming regions in a distance of only approx. 1500 LY. In the center of the image a very bright Reflection Nebula around the variable star V380 Orionis shines up. In the middle of this nebula one can detect (especially in the Hi-Res version) an extremely dark spot, the nature of which is still under investigation. The latest reaearch results support that this dark area is really empty space. The origin of this in a starforming region still has to be explained.
Around the center one finds many Reflection and Emission Nebulae, all created by the radiation of young hot stars. Several of them are socalled Herbig-Haro Objects, which is a class of stars still in the process of being born.

The image was taken at the observatory of IAS at Hakos Farm in Namibia.

Credit: Astro Cabinet Astrophotography by Dieter Willasch

Cosmic dust clouds and young, energetic stars inhabit this telescopic vista, less than 500 light-years away toward the northern boundary of Corona Australis, the Southern Crown. The dust clouds effectively block light from more distant background stars in the Milky Way. But the striking complex of reflection nebulae cataloged as NGC 6726, 6727, and IC 4812 produce a characteristic blue color as light from the region’s young hot stars is reflected by the cosmic dust. The dust also obscures from view stars still in the process of formation. At the left, smaller yellowish nebula NGC 6729 bends around young variable star R Coronae Australis. Just below it, glowing arcs and loops shocked by outflows from embedded newborn stars are identified as Herbig-Haro objects. On the sky this field of view spans about 1 degree. That corresponds to almost 9 light-years at the estimated distance of the nearby star forming region.

Image Credit & Copyright: CHART32 Team, Processing - Johannes Schedler

Located roughly 1300 light years distant in the constellation Pupis at the southern end of the great Gum Nebula; these objects are what are known as cometary globule complex CG30, CG31 & CG38.

Created by gravity; these pockets of dense interstellar gas and dust stretch roughly one light year and are molded into their comet-like shapes through ionization by nearby stars that shower them with energetic ultraviolet (UV) radiation.

In the dense heads of these universal sculptures lie infant stars that are still undergoing formation. Over time gravity will continue to pool material into the densest regions. It will then contract, collapse and heat the local region.

This process will repeat over and over until it reaches the critical point where the conditions allow for fusion to take place and the star will come to life.

In the annotated image presented below.  The head of CG30 contains the bright Herbig-Haro object HH120 that is powered by a young star, CG 30-IRS4 based upon IR data.   Distance estimates are 700-1300 light years.  The image is ~42’ x 42’ and North is down.

CG30,31 is a cometary globule complex located in southern portion of the large Gum Nebula at RA 8hr 08min 50.5s and DEC -35d 50m 54s near the constellations of Vela and Pupis.

Overall, we think the Gum Nebula is pretty cool! Well actually it is fascinating in our books…

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