herbal flowers

Edible Magickal Flowers and Folk Lore

The culinary use of flowers dates back thousands of years to the Chinese, Greeks and Romans. Many cultures use flowers in their traditional cooking, medicine, and magick.

 Adding flowers to your food can be a nice way to add color, flavor and a little magickal whimsy. Some are spicy, and some herbaceous, while others are floral and fragrant. The range is surprising. Flower petals can be used in salads and as garnish for desserts, but they also inspire magickal creative uses as well. Use them to make floral spirit water for rituals, as a medicinal tea, or add to a healing spell or love potion….  the possibilities are endless.

 TIPS FOR SAFE AND TASTY DINING:

  •        Not all flowers are edible (those listed below are safe for consumption) - As lovely as eating flowers can be, some can also be a little … deadly, so only eat flowers you know to be consumable — if you are uncertain, consult a reference book on edible flowers and plants. (Always refer to the botanical name when verifying whether a flower is safe to eat.)
  •       Just because a flower is edible doesn’t mean it will taste good. Some will be more to your liking than others – it’s all a matter of taste. Keep in mind that the stamen, pistil and sepal of some blossoms are bitter and can contain pollen that may detract from the true flavor of the flower. Consuming only the petals will further heighten the appeal factor.
  •       Eat flowers you have grown yourself, or know to be safe for consumption. Flowers from the florist or nursery have probably been treated with pesticides or other chemicals.
  •       Do not eat roadside flowers or those picked in public parks. Both may have been treated with pesticide or herbicide, and roadside flowers may be polluted by car exhaust.
  •      Eat only the petals, and remove pistils and stamens before eating.
  •      If you suffer from allergies, introduce edible flowers gradually, as they may exacerbate allergies.
  •     To keep flowers fresh, place them on moist paper towels and refrigerate in an airtight container. Some will last up to 10 days this way. Ice water can revitalize limp flowers.


1, Allium
All blossoms from the allium family (leeks, chives, garlic, garlic chives) are edible and flavorful.  Flavors run the gamut from delicate leek to robust garlic. Every part of these plants is edible. Garlic is masculine in nature and associated with the planet Mars, the element fire and the sign Aries. It is sacred to Hecate and is a suitable offering to her left at a crossroads.  Garlic has antibiotic properties, but should not be used directly on wounds or in poultices or salves because it can be irritating to the skin and may inhibit blood clotting.

2. Angelica
Depending on the variety, flowers range from pale lavender-blue to deep rose and have a licorice-like flavor. Believed to have originated in Syria, angelica is now found just about everywhere. In ancient times it was used to ward off the plague and evil and as a cure for poison and… well, just about everything else. Angelica is associated with the angels Michael and Gabriel. It is aligned with the sun and the element of fire and sacred to Venus. Angelica tea is useful for colic, gas, indigestion, hepatitis, heartburn, nausea, ulcers and various other digestive ailments.

3. Anise Hyssop
Both flowers and leaves have a subtle anise or licorice flavor. Anise is one of the oldest known plants that were grown for both culinary and medicinal use. Anise is associated with the element of air, the God Apollo, the planets Mercury and Jupiter, and the astrological sign Gemini. Anise is also considered masculine.

4. Basil
Blossoms come in a variety of colors, from white to pink to lavender; flavor is similar to the leaves, but milder. The word Basil comes from the Greeks, meaning “King”.  Basil is sacred to Vishnu, Tulasi and Erzulie, masculine in nature, and associated with the element of fire and the planet Mars. Basil helps steady the mind, brings happiness, love, peace, and money and protects against insanity.

5. Calendula / Marigold
A great flower for eating, calendula blossoms are peppery, tangy, and spicy — and their vibrant golden color adds a dash of magick to any dish. The ancient Egyptians, Greeks and Romans all loved calendula and used it for culinary and healing purposes. During the medieval period it was considered a cure for just about everything.  Marigold is associated with the Sun. Calendula symbolizes love and constancy.  It is great for wedding bouquets and decorations. It is the traditional “he loves me, he loves me not” flower and is useful for love potions. Dried petals can be strewn to consecrate an area or burned in consecration incense. They are also a good addition to dream pillows.

6. Carnations
Petals are sweet, once trimmed away from the base. The blossoms taste like their sweet, perfumed aroma.  In ancient Rome, carnations were known as “Jove’s Flower” as a tribute to their beloved king of the gods, Jupiter.  Carnations are masculine, associated with the Sun and Jupiter, and with the element fire.  Those things that fall under the rule of Jupiter are ideal for use in magickal applications related to luck, money, good fortune, status, legal matters, fertility, friendship, ambition, career, success and protection. The flowers can be used to lend strength in healing applications. The practitioner can also use carnation essential oils to increase health and vigor.

7. Chamomile
Small and daisy like, the flowers have a sweet flavor and are often used in tea. Ragweed sufferers may be allergic to chamomile.  The Romans used Chamomile for incense.  Chamomile was used in ancient Egypt for fevers and was dedicated to their Sun God Ra.  Chamomile is associated with the sun, Leo and the element of water. It helps cleanse and invigorate the throat chakra (5th). It is associated with various Sun Gods, including Cernunnos, Lugh and others.  It is used in spells for money, peace, love, tranquility and purification.

8. Chrysanthemum / Mum
A little bitter, mums come in a rainbow of colors and a range of flavors range from peppery to pungent. Use only the petals. In Celtic folklore, chrysanthemums in the garden were considered a meeting place for the faeries. Chrysanthemum is masculine in nature and resonates with the energy of the Sun and the element of fire.  Chrysanthemum has been used for burial rituals and is a suitable decoration for Samhain and for ancestral altars.  The dried flower heads of chrysanthemum can be burned during house blessings ceremonies. 

9. Dandelion
The bright yellow flowers should be gathered as soon as they open. Remove the green bits from the base of the flower before using. These can be added to wines, vinegar or jellies. The name dandelion comes from the French, “dent de lion” which means “tooth of the lion”.  The dandelion is masculine in action and associated with the planet Jupiter, the element of air and both Pisces and Sagittarius. It is also associated with any solar deity, Hecate, Brigid and Belenos.  A tea of the flowers and leaves may be consumed to increase psychic ability, while pouring boiling water over a bowlful of roots will aid in calling spirits.   You can also make a wish and blow the seeds off a dandelion head.

10. Lavender
Sweet, spicy, and perfumed, the flowers are a great addition to both savory and sweet dishes. Some of the earliest recorded uses of lavender are by the Roman soldiers who used the wild-growing plant to perfume their bathwater and wash their clothes. Lavender is masculine in action and associated with Mercury. It is also associated with the element of air and the astrological sign Virgo. It may be used as an asperging herb (to sprinkle water for purification purposes) and dried lavender sticks or wands can be burnt like incense. It is also useful in spells to sharpen the mind, to encourage or strengthen pure love and to encourage fertility. The scent of lavender is relaxing and uplifting all at once making it a great aromatherapy for stressed out or depressed individuals. Try adding some lavender oil to your bath or add it to mild oil for a relaxing massage at the end of a hard day. Stuffing a pillow with lavender buds may help insomniacs relax and fall asleep and soothes headaches.

11.  Oregano
The flowers are a pretty, subtle version of the leaf. Oregano is ruled by Venus and the element of air and associated with Aphrodite. It is used in spells for happiness, tranquility, luck, health, protection and letting go of a loved one. It can also be used in spells to deepen existing love. When worn on the head during sleep, it is said to promote psychic dreams. Oregano symbolizes joy. Use it for rituals celebrating joyful occasions, or in spells to bring joy into one’s life.

12.  Rose
Remove the white, bitter base and the remaining petals have a strongly perfumed flavor perfect for floating in drinks or scattering across desserts, and for a variety of jams. All roses are edible, with flavor more pronounced in darker varieties. From the time of Solomon, the rose has been the flower most closely linked with love. The rose was sacred to Venus, the Roman goddess of love, and was connected to her messenger, Cupid. Roses have been cultivated for over 5,000 years. Roses are associated with Aphrodite, Adonis and Eros. Rosewater is a protective agent worn on clothes. Rose petals can be added to charms against the evil eye.

13.  Rosemary
Flowers taste like a milder version of the herb; nice used as a garnish on dishes that incorporate rosemary. The word Rosmarinus is from the Latin meaning “dew of the sea”.  Rosemary is also associated with Aphrodite and appears in many ancient images of Her. Rosemary was used to ward off evil spirits and nightmares. The wood was used to make musical instruments. Rosemary is male in nature and ruled by Leo, the element fire and the sun (or Moon, depending who you ask).  It’s sacred to Hebe, Aphrodite and the Virgin Mary. Rosemary can be used in spells for fidelity and remembrance as well as to dispel jealousy. Rosemary is useful for ritual baths, and for making sacred herbal water for ritual cleansing, blessing and purification. Bathing in rosemary will enhance your memory.  

14. Sage
Blossoms have a subtle flavor similar to the leaves. Sage is a hardy perennial of the mint family.  The Romans regarded sage quite highly and much sacrifice and ceremony was associated with its harvest. They believed it stimulated the brain and memory and used it to clean their teeth. Sage is masculine in nature and associated the element of air and the planet Jupiter. Sage is sacred to the Greek Zeus and Roman Jupiter. It is also a symbol of the Virgin Mary. Sage is used in magical workings for immortality, longevity, wisdom, protection and the granting of wishes. Sage is also believed to help alleviate sorrow of the death of a loved one.

15. Sunflower
Petals can be eaten, and the bud can be steamed like an artichoke. Sunflower is associated with the sun and all solar deities. Its essence helps balance the first chakra and also helps with confidence in leadership roles. Sunflower oil can be used as carrier oil for healing oils used in massages and ointments.

16. Violets
Another famous edible flower, violets are floral, sweet and beautiful as garnishes. Use the flowers in salads and to garnish desserts and drinks. In Roman mythology, violets were said to be lesser goddesses who once dared to rival the beauty of Aphrodite, goddess of love and beauty.  Violets are affiliated with the planet Venus or Pluto and are associated with the nymphs of ancient Greek myths.  Violets are also associated with death and rebirth through the story of Attis. Violets are useful in love spells and may be carried as an amulet to increase one’s luck in love. Try combining them with lavender for an enhanced effect.

 Sources:  HerbalRiot, Cheralyndarcey, Witches of the Craft, Inspirationforthespirit,  Witchipedia 

Made my first spell jar! I’ve been pretty emotionally unstable today (probably just going to be on my period soon) so for my spell jar the main thing was just having a better mood.
I added:
•Dirt from a place that makes me happy
•moonstone (promotes emotional stability)
•valerian root tea leaves (calmness)
•chamomile tea leaves (calmness)
•cinnamon stick bark (happiness)
And that is all. Really hoping this helps🙌🏻

Magical herbal DIY’s for every part of your precious body.

For the witches (or anyone else) who are into herbs and smelling good.

The magical attributes of the DIY’S according to the herbs used are highlighted in the contents section below in brackets. You can choose one or multiple attributes to focus on while using these products to match your intent. 

Contents:

1. Floral facial steam: Leaves your face feeling fresh AF, smelling good. (Protection, love, centering and psychic power)

2. Rose & chamomile bath bags: Relaxing AF, smells good, SUPER CLENSING. (Protection, centering and meditation)

3. Clay and Lavender face mask: We all know clay is dope for our skin, and lavender can never go wrong. (Peace, protection, love, purification)

4. Peppermint foot scrub: Leaves your feet feeling and smelling FIIIINEEE. (Travel, money, healing, luck, strength)

LETS GET STARTED

1. Floral facial steam

YOU WILL NEED (The ingredients below are per 6 treatments so multiply it for as many treatments as you’d like): 

-3 100ml jars

-2/3 cup of lavender buds, dried

-1/3 cup of rose petals, dried

-2/3 cup chamomile flowers, dried

METHOD:

Mix up the herbs ad divide them into each jar (roughly half a cup each)

HOW TO USE:

• Remove make up or dirt by using a gentle cleanser
• Place herbs in a heatproof bowl (use 4 tablespoons herbs per treatment – each jar is enough for 2 treatments)
• Pour one pint of boiling water into a heat proof bowl (USE MOON WATER FOR EXTRA BENEFITS)
• Place bowl on a sturdy surface (like a table) and lower face over the bowl (it’s usually best to sit in a chair that is pulled up close to a table)
• Place a towel over your head to create a tent over the bowl (the towel helps the steam stay close to the face and not evaporate into the air so quickly)
• Stay here for about 15 to 20 minutes- while you are here start by centring yourself, and then think about your intent and what you wish for the herb to bring to you, imagine the steam cleansing away any negativity. 

BOOOM YOU ARE NOW CLEANSED AF AND SMELLING CUTEEEE. 


2. Rose & chamomile bath bags

YOU WILL NEED (The ingredients below are per 3 treatments so multiply it for as many treatments as you’d like):

-3 Muslin bags

-¾ cup dried rose petals

-¾ cup dried chamomile flowers

-1 ½ cup epsom salts

METHOD:
Mix all the ingredients in a large bowl. Place 1 cup of mixture in each muslin bag. Tie the top of each bag to close tightly.

HOW TO USE:

To use bath tea bag, tie bag to faucet so the water runs through it as the bath fills. Once the bath is full of warm water, remove the bag from the faucet and let it float in the bath. Soak for at least 15 minutes - while doing so, remember to relax, centre yourself, remember your intent and what you wish to get out of this treatment and imagine the salts and hot water clensing away any negative energy.

BOOOOM NOW U R CLENSED AF AND SMELLIN FRESH

3. Clay and Lavender face mask

YOU WILL NEED (once again makes 3 , adjust to your liking):

-3 100 ml jars

-½ cup lavender flower powder

-1 1/8 cup white cosmetic clay

METHOD:

Mix up and divide into jars, roughly half a cup per jar. 

HOW TO USE:

At time of use, mix 1 tablespoon of lavender-clay mix with 2-3 teaspoons of water, cooled chamomile tea, or hydrosol, until a paste forms. Spread over the face, avoiding the eyes. Leave for 15 minutes. This mask draws out toxins and negative energy so make sure to visualise the clay mask absorbing the negative energy for maximum effect, meanwhile, pour your intent into this procedure and absorb the lavender and mother earth’s clay into your system. Wash off with warm water and a wash cloth. 

BOOOM yo face is untoxic AF super clensed, and smelling damn fineeee.

4. Peppermint foot scrub

What you need (MAKES 3):

-3 250-300(ish)ml jars

-1/3 cup fine sea salt or epsom salt

-¾ cup oil (grapeseed, sweet almond or olive)

-Few drops peppermint essential oil

-¼ cup dried peppermint leaves

METHOD:

Mix ingredients in bowl, divide into jars, roughly 1 cup per jar.

HOW TO USE:

Rub into damp foot in circular motions. Our feet pick up alot of negative energy, and are important because they take us places in the physical world, make sure to focus on your intent and drawing out the negative energy.


AND THERE YOU HAVE IT! YOU SMELL FRESH FROM HEAD TO TOE, CLENSED THOROUGHLY, EVERY PART OF YOUR BODY, LOVED! 

Happy witching

~ @indigo-amethyst

I’m officially posting my very first tag post ! I was tagged in the #myaestheticself post and I was so excited to do it because I had so many ideas! A few words to describe my aesthetic would be: Woodland cottages 🌲Nature 🌿🦋🐝Woodwind instrumental music 🎼 Foxes 🦊 Flowers 🌷🌻 Writing 📝 Tea ☕️ Candles 🕯 and Holistic Healing and Herbalism🌱

flickr

Herbalist’s Workshop by Marcus Rodriguez

Flower Ingredients for Emotional Healing

While researching alternative healing methods I came across the flower healing extracts. The idea being that certain flowers would help with different emotional and mental states. While this is actually a still existing alternative medicine and not actual witchcraft ingredients, there is some overlap and some plants and flowers I don’t normally see on ingredients posts

I found the list interesting, and even though some of these flowers may be harder to come by than many kitchen witch ingredients, I thought those on the tumblr witchcraft community who are looking to experiment with different ingredients to refine their potions, spells, and charms might benefit from trying some of these flowers. If you find any of this list helps in your craft I would love to hear about it

Fear

Rock Rose (Helianthemum nummalarium) – Extreme fear, terror, panic

Mimulus (Mimulus guttatus) – shyness, timidity, known fears

Cherry Plum (prunus cerasifera) – collapse of mental control, vicious temper, fear of doing harm or self-harm

Aspen (populous tremula) – apprehension, foreboding, unknown and vague fears

Red chestnut (aesculus carnea) – exaggerated fear of others (especially loved ones), anxiety of “the worst”

Overcare for others’ welfare

Chicory (cichorium intybus) – possessiveness, demanding respect and obedience, selfishness

Vervain (verbena officinalis) – overenthusiasm, fanaticism, nervousness, rage at injustice

Vine (vitis vinifera) – domination, inflexibility, ambition, strength, tyranny, autocracy

Beech (fagus sylvatica) – intolerance, criticism, arrogance, judgmental tendencies

Rock Water (water from well or spring) – self-denial, rigidity, tightness, self-repression, example setting, self-righteousness

Lack of Interest

Clematis (clematis vitalba) – daydreaming, indifference, inattention, escapism

Honeysuckle (lonicera caprifolium) – nostalgia, living in the past, homesickness

Wild rose (rosa canina) – resignation, apathy, no ambition

Olive (olea europaea) – complete exhaustion, loss of energy, overwhelmed by daily tasks

White chestnut (aesculus hippocastanum) – persistent unwanted worries, mental arguments

Mustard (sinapis arvensis) – deep gloom, melancholia

Chestnut bud (aesculus hippocastanum) – slowness in learning life lessons, repetition of mistakes

Despondency and despair

Larch (larix decidua) – lack of confidence, fear of failure, unwillingness to try, feelings of inferiority

Pine (pinus sylvestris) – guilt, self-reproach, feeling unworthy, taking blame for others

Elm (ulmus procera) – overwhelmed by responsibility though normally capable

Sweet chestnut (castanea sativa) – extreme anguish, desolation, at limit of endurance (nonsuicidal)

Star of Bethlehem (Ornithogalum umbellatum) – reactions to fright, serious news, great sorrow, trauma

Willow (salix vitellina) – Resentment, bitterness, self-pity

Oak (quercus robur) – struggling against illness (mental or physical)

Crab apple (malus pumilia) – feeling unclean in mind or body, self-image issues

Loneliness

Water violet (hottonia palustris) – pride, reserved, aloof, overly independent

Impatiens (impatiens glandulifera) – impatience with others, hastiness, jumping to conclusions or actions

Heather (calluna vulgaris) – over-concern with self, overtalkative, poor listening, hatred of being alone

Oversensitivity

Agrimony (agrimonia eupatoria) – inner torture, hiding worries

Centaury (centaurium umbellatum) – weak will, anxiety to please, inability to say “no”

Walnut (juglans regia) – difficulty in transition or change, wavering before powerful influences

Holly (ilex aquifolium) – lack of love for others, envy, jealousy, hatred, suspicion

Uncertainty

Cerato (ceratostigma willmottiana) – doubting own judgment, seeking approval of others before acting

Scleranthus (scleranthus annuus) – uncertainty, indecision, fluctuating moods

Gentian (gentiana amarella) – despondence, easily discouraged, dejected

Gorse (ulex europaeus) – extreme hopelessness, despair, pessimism, negativity

Hornbeam (carpinus betulus) – procrastination, lack of energy for tasks

Wild oat (bromus ramosus) – lack of fulfillment, aimless ambition, feeling out of place

pros of being a green witch:

• u own at least 1 brightly colored succulent (they are a delight)
• so many herbal books with detailed descriptions of plants
• that really obscure herb u need to cook with? You already probably have it
• 100+ types of herbs everywhere
• literally every type of tea known to man is in the pantry
• cute plants everywhere
• grimoire is easier to hide if u need to because it looks like ur just really into plants
• Easy to say ur just trying to live more natural if ur related to religious people and they think ur weird for having so many plants and herbs and other stuff laying around

cons:


• when u grow too many plants and when it gets too hard to keep up with every plant and one of them dies u will Cry

Ocatillo

Devil’s Walking Stick, Whipthorn & Canethorn are other names I’ve heard it called. 

It’s a plant that thrives in the Mojave and other deserts of the south west. It can grow over 20 feet high and for the majority of the year it is brown and leafless but when it gets moisture leaves sprout and then it will bloom. 

However the plant itself is covered in spikes roughly about an inch and a half in length. Once a rod gets thick enough it can be cut and the spikes cut off and it makes a good walking cane with a very interesting growth pattern because as it grows it forms new spikes and pushes them out to the side over and over again as it gets longer and higher. These spikes thankfully are not barbed and Ocatilla has been used both as a planted natural barrier and harvested and woven into a fence to make a sort of natural barbed wire. 

The flowers of the plant are edible and tangy. They can be eaten raw or brewed into a tea. They have also been used as a medicine by the Mojave, Paiute and Navajo for slowing bleeding of a wound, helping suppress coughs and aching limbs. 

It’s one of the nastier plants out here that has a lot of good benefits just like most of them. In the Northern Mojave it’s not too common but more towards Vegas and California they’re everywhere.