herb medicine

Made my first spell jar! I’ve been pretty emotionally unstable today (probably just going to be on my period soon) so for my spell jar the main thing was just having a better mood.
I added:
•Dirt from a place that makes me happy
•moonstone (promotes emotional stability)
•valerian root tea leaves (calmness)
•chamomile tea leaves (calmness)
•cinnamon stick bark (happiness)
And that is all. Really hoping this helps🙌🏻

Anyhoo, this is about as simple as it gets. An echinacea tincture is the perfect first tincture to make. If you’re using fresh herbs you’d fill the jar ¾ with chopped herbs, and use 100 proof alcohol. You can use vinegar or glycerine to make tinctures, but that’s another comic.  

I’m doing that Center for Cartoon Studies one week workout to stretch some atrophied comics muscles. Bro, I need a month long remedial lettering course.

A note.

I see a lot of people posting herbal remedies.

Please, please include the cautions and contradictions with an herb when you recommend it.

Herbs are drugs. Some of them should not be used by pregnant or nursing women (kava kava comes to mind).

Valerian is not a substitute for narcotic sleep aids. Valerian is a narcotic sleep aid.

St. John’s wort messes up the action of oral contraceptives.

Marshmallow root should not be mixed with other medicines or taken at the same time as it can interfere with their action.

Catnip (used for sleep problems) can make already heavy menstrual periods worse.

Etc, etc, etc. Please remember you are recommending medicines and medicines can have effects other than the ones you want.

10

A curious herbal containing five hundred cuts, of the most useful plants, which are now used in the practice of physick engraved on folio copper plates, 

By Blackwell, Elizabeth,
John Nourse.
Samuel Harding.
Publication info
London : Printed for Samuel Harding, 1737-1739.
BHL Collections:
Blog Features
Missouri Botanical Garden’s Materia Medica
Missouri Botanical Garden’s Rare Books Collections

Witches on a Budget

I’m gonna start posting Witch tips for people who don’t have a whole lot of money if anyone has suggestions, let me know.

So tip #1: making your own incense

I don’t always have enough money to buy incense, the only shop in town that sells it is a smoke shop that you can’t enter unless 19+ and they sell it for ten bucks for like 3 sticks. Plus, the incense is loaded with perfumes and chemicals which just aren’t my thing. So I’ve started making my own. It’s sooooo easy and most online tutorials are super expensive and complex.

*Crushing your herbs is optional

In a bowl, mix together the following ingredients
•dry (crushed) herbs of your choice (you can Google what kind of herbs to burn) I chose lavender, chamomile, and rosemary.
•honey (keep mixing in more honey until herbs create a thick paste)

After mixing, form into balls or cones and create a flat base.

Leave balls/cones to dry out for a few days.

Then once dry, place in incense burner and burn.

(Bonus, these last longer than the sticks and once it’s fully burned you can make incense with the ashes)

Herb (Plant) - Dandelion

Magical Properties

- Dandelion has a number of properties associated with metaphysical skills: it’s used in dream work, divination, especially effective in spirit communication and summoning, and will supposedly aid psychic development. When the leaves and root are burned they can be used as an incense to boost clairvoyance and divinatory abilities.

- The leaf, root, and flower have a few different aspects, but are mostly similar as far as magic goes.

- Dandelion is associated with wind and air spirits. It was also supposedly used in invocations to Hecate and death related deities.

- Bury or plant dandelions at the northwest corner of your home to bring favourable energies and draw good luck.

- They are also used for: purification, wishes, healing, positivity, and protection from bad dreams.

Medicinal Properties

- Dandelion root helps the body dispose of unwanted skin bacteria.

- It stimulates digestion and helps the liver.

- Because it helps the liver rid the body of toxins and excess hormones, it benefits the female reproductive system by assisting the regulation of hormone production.

- It’s a gentle laxative and a natural diuretic.

- NOTE: always make sure the dandelion greens you harvest have never been submitted to herbicide.

5 Healing Herbal Teas That Will Have To Do Some Heavy Fucking Lifting If The Affordable Care Act Is Repealed

Sometimes the natural remedies are the best, and if Congress guts the ACA, they’re about all you’ve got.

1. Chamomile: Containing natural oils that relax the soft muscles of the stomach, chamomile is the perfect tea to calm an upset tummy. And because there’s no earthly way anyone going through chemo uninsured will be able to afford anti-nausea medication, too, it better start pulling its damn weight. Every Affordable Care Act provision that gets repealed is another burden on the shoulders of soothing chamomile.

2. Sage: It’s not just for cooking! Sage has been used for centuries as a tea to ease menstrual cramps, so if and when Congress decides regulating your period with birth control or an IUD should be prohibitively expensive, it’s going to have to step its shit up as a permanent pinch hitter for your Yaz. Can sage pull it off? Hell no. That said, since getting dropped by your insurance would mean having to choose between birth control and groceries, it’s slightly better than nothing.

3. Passion flower: Can a tea substitute for Xanax? It’s time to fucking find out! The beautifully named passion flower brews into a delicious tea that doubles as an anxiety-easing sedative, and it’s gotta be a pretty goddamn strong one if it’s going to take your mind off the fact that refilling the pills that let you get any sleep at all just got fucked up to a hundred dollars a pop following whatever half-baked Band-Aid Congress slaps on the carcass of the ACA.

4. Lemon balm: Say goodbye to tension, malaise, and access to affordable antidepressants thanks to healing lemon balm and an intense partisan rancor in D.C. that has somehow manifested itself as cutting health care for millions of Americans. While this mild mood-lifting medicinal tea stacks up against some honest-to-god Lexapro about as well as a butterfly kiss does to a chainsaw, maybe brewing it double strong could help. It’s not like you’ve got many other options.

5. Lipton tea: Yeah, it’s just generic fucking Lipton tea, but it’s three bucks a box, and if you think you’ll have the budget for hand-rolled loose-leaf medicinal herbs from that specialty store with all the jars once the ACA’s dead, you might want to check your math. Better hope it’s got some healing properties we don’t know about!