her growth

my favorite thematic message of Wonder Woman (and I loved a lot of the narratives in this movie, let’s be clear about that) was that empathy and compassion are strengths, not weaknesses.

this is something that is hardly ever conveyed on screen, in superhero properties or elsewhere in entertainment - I can’t think of the last time I saw it done, especially not so clearly. 

every time Diana felt compassion or showed empathy for the plight of those suffering around her, she became stronger. she would see something that caused her pain because other people were in pain, and she channeled that emotion into her powers, using them to do good in some way. this happens repeatedly in the film (from the tower climb in Themyscira to no man’s land), culminating with seeing Steve’s death and the impending death of her other comrades-in-arms, when her powers erupt forth from her body, so strong they nearly consume those around her at once. her emotions fueled the growth of her powers until she was strong enough that she defeated the god of war. her emotions made her powerful enough that she could become the godkiller, the world’s savior.

society teaches us that emotion and compassion and empathy are weak, are only going to get us hurt in the long run. we are told to repress and hide our feelings because it’s not socially acceptable. but when Diana shows emotion, when she vocalizes her urge to show empathy for others, she literally becomes stronger.

this is probably the film’s subtlest message - but imho it might be the most important. feelings are something to be embraced, not rejected. a superhero feels the pain of others acutely - and she uses those emotions to save the world. 

8
  • what he says: I'm fine.
  • What he means: haruhi fujioka went and entire anime without ever succumbing the classic female-character-in-anime-traps. her personal arc never centers around the men in her life, but rather on her personal growth. her main flaw isn't that she works too hard, or overshadows the boys, or is bitchy. her main flaw is a disconnection from humanity and her desire to take the world's burdens on her shoulders. her mother's death at a young age left her with the belief that she had to be responsible and strong before all else, leaving her to distance herself from the people she cared about and making her miss out on the fun things about her life (a classic inversion or the western 'you're the man of the house now' trope). in meeting the host club haruhi is placed into a strange and often wonder-land esque world (highlighted more in later episodes) where she learns to connect with others and to let herself enjoy life, while staying responsible. haruhi's studies never suffer and she is never made to feel like she can do anything less then what she set out to do, but she learns to have fun with life to, that she can just be a kid a still work towards all her goals, and in the end chasing after tamaki and telling him she wanted to stay in the host club and that all of them loved doing it, brings her arc full circle, and allows her to choose the friends she's made and show she's learned to care about them, without compelling her to make a choice between them and her career. in many ways the core message of haruhi's story is that it is entirely possible to have everything you want without giving anything or anyone in your life up, and haruhi didn't have to make a choice between her family of choice and the goals she felt she had to fulfill to make her mother proud of her.
buzzfeed.com
25 LGBT Characters On TV That Have Made A Difference
Television needs more LGBT characters, but that doesn't mean that there aren't some great people out there already.
By Scott Bryan

1.  Bill Potts (Pearl Mackie) in Doctor Who

Originally posted by assian-candor

“It’s awesome to see a black gay woman who is just casually queer and no one cares. I’m super upset she’s not going to be in Season 11 though, because of course that’s what happens.”

4. Alex Danvers (Chyler Leigh) and Maggie Sawyer (Floriana Lima) in Supergirl

Originally posted by niall69sara-blog

“These characters give me that sense of representation I have been looking for since I came out. Both women hold high-power and important jobs and respect and encourage each other through them. They are the only reason I religiously keep up with the show.”

8. Sara Lance (Caity Lotz) in Legends of Tommorrow

Originally posted by supercanaries

“Sara Lance is absolutely, without a doubt, my icon. She is one of the most badass characters on Arrow / Legends of Tomorrow and she’s had relationships with both men and women, making her the only bisexual hero out there (that I know of at least).”

11. Yorkie (Mackenzie Davis) and Kelly (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) in the “San Junipero” episode of Black Mirror

Originally posted by glovrdonald

“Sometimes I feel I’ll never be able to date a girl because of my shyness towards my identity, but seeing Yorkie in a loving relationship really helped me out.”

13. Waverly Earp (Dominique Provost-Chalkley) and Nicole Haught (Katherine Barrell) in Wynonna Earp

Originally posted by youareavision

“They’re a power couple in such an underrated show that needs to be more recognised. Their relationship is so beautiful and powerful, yet their adorableness doesn’t take away from the fact that they’re both badasses! This show is one of the very few shows that doesn’t queer-bait its audience either.”

16. Nomi Marks (Jamie Clayton) in Sense8

Originally posted by turnthewheel-andthefuturechanges

“She is the first and only trans character I’ve seen whose plotline and character development had nothing to do with being transgender, instead focusing on her relationship with Amanita and her abilities as a hacker.”

25. And Buffy the Vampire Slayer’s Willow (Alyson Hannigan)

Originally posted by vivianorrzuzu

“It felt amazing for teenage me to see a lesbian on TV be characterised not by her orientation but by everything else about her: her nerdiness, her ridiculous fuzzy sweaters, her quirky way of speaking, her growth from a shy and timid wallflower to a confident and powerful witch. I loved that her relationships with her friends were emphasised just as much as her relationships with her girlfriend

“as the person who sort of made lucretia… in my mind, she was never a villain. like i never - i never ever ever ever thought of her, not even for a little bit, as doing evil in this world.

in my mind, lucretia’s probably my favorite character. especially because of like, the things that happened in the stolen century and her growth there and the way that things changed, like that growth was the most concrete growth that i think any character went through in the entire show.

and what i really tried to set up in the stolen century is that like this is a really tough thing you all were going through, and you all had different ways of dealing with it, and her way was very… perhaps overprotective, right?

and so this thing that she did, she knew that you all were hurting, and she had this idea for how to solve it, and everybody else’s idea was different, and she thought the idea that you all went with was… wrong, was inherently wrong.

and so she grew from being this character who was very much on the sidelines, writing about the things that other people were doing, and taking actions into her own hands, and simultaneously like, making her friends forget this like, really really difficult and painful ordeal that they all had gone through.

and so in my mind, she was not… she was not evil. she was never ever ever ever the villain.”

Originally posted by janine-drizzy

The newest addition to my pack. Meet Raven.
She came into the shelter at only 15 lbs when she should have been around 50lbs. Lack of nutrition has stunted her growth. In the two weeks that we have had her she has already put on 20 lbs.