her body * *

10 Fun Facts About Barbara Steele by Kimberly Lindbergs

Barbara Steele became a cult film icon thanks to her memorable roles in a number of low-budget horror movies, but her filmography also includes critically acclaimed art films and interesting British dramas. FilmStruck and Criterion Channel subscribers can currently stream four of Steele’s best movies and when viewed together they become a wonderful, rowdy and wild introduction to one of my favorite actresses and her small but impressive body of work.

I suggest kick-starting your viewing party with Basil Dearden’s neo-noir crime drama SAPPHIRE (’56), which includes Barbara Steele in one of earliest and briefest screen appearances playing a young college student whose friend has been brutally murdered. Follow that with Mario Bava’s Gothic horror classic BLACK SUNDAY (‘60) starring Steele in the dual role of Asa Vadja, a 200-year-old Moldavian Princess accused of practicing witchcraft and vampirism, and Katia, her much younger and gentle-hearted ancestor. The third film I recommend is Fellini’s autobiographical 8 ½ (’63) where you can see Steele dancing her way into cinema history and last but not least, finish with Volker Schlöndorff’s anti-fascist creed YOUNG TORLESS (’66). In the final film, Steele portrays a seductive prostitute who propositions students at a boy’s boarding school.

Her transgressive filmography isn’t for the timid or easily shocked, but adventurous audiences will find it especially rewarding. Unfortunately, Steele’s roles were often brief, ephemeral moments that haunt her fans, and you’re left wondering why she wasn’t given more screen time or additional opportunities to showcase her talents. 

To accompany Steele’s films, I thought I’d compile a list of fun facts about the actress to spark your interest and spur your imagination. 

  1. Barbara Steele was born on December 29, 1938 and raised in the British seaport town of Birkenhead near Liverpool. Her parents encouraged her artistic pursuits and she studied dance, piano and acting at a young age but she was especially fond of the visual arts and longed to become a professional painter. A few other well-known Birkenhead residents include the Academy Award-winning actress Glenda Jackson (WOMEN IN LOVE [’69], THE DEVIL IS A WOMAN [’73], HOPSCOTCH [’80]) and Targon Egerton, the 28-year-old star of KINGSMAN: THE SECRET SERVICE (’15) and KINGSMAN: THE GOLDEN CIRCLE (’18). 
  2. Her interest in the visual arts and antiques drove Steele to study painting at the Chelsea College of Arts in London and in Paris at the Sorbonne. During this period, she was reportedly befriended and seduced by future film director Donald Cammell (PERFORMANCE [’70], DEMON SEED [’77], WHITE OF THE EYE [’87]). Steele has told interviewers that she “wanted to be Picasso” but fate had other plans for the aspiring artist. 
  3. To make money while she was an art student, Steele sold copper jewelry and antique prints from a pushcart. During weekends, she could be found peddling her wares to passersby on London’s Portobello Road where she supposedly earned a reputation as a “shrewd dealer.” 
  4. Steele was persuaded to become an actress after she was spotted by a director while painting sets for a stage production of Bell, Book and Candle in Glasgow, Scotland. The director was so taken by Steele’s otherworldly beauty that he encouraged her to audition for the role of Gillian the witch after the star of the play fell ill. The character of Gillian was made famous by Kim Novak who appeared in the film adaptation, but Steele would eventually become a star in her own right after playing another witch; the black-hearted Asa Vajda in Mario Bava’s Gothic horror classic BLACK SUNDAY.
  5. After a brief career on stage and some modeling jobs, Barbara Steele was discovered by talent agents from Rank Organisation. They signed her on the spot but the British studio didn’t seem to know what to do with the budding actress so they sold her contract to 20th Century Fox. In Hollywood, Steele was put through a torturous star-making routine that involved dying her dark locks blond and pinning her ears. When it was over she was cast alongside Elvis Presley in FLAMING STAR (’60) but after some heated disagreements with costumers and director Don Siegel, Steele reportedly stormed off the set. Soon afterward the historic 1960 Screen Actors Guild and Writers Guild of America strikes shut Hollywood down and during the interim Steele decided to return to Europe.
  6. According to Steele, Mario Bava first spotted the actress in a photoshoot she did for a 1958 issue of Life and was struck by her saturnine beauty. Later, while pursuing a stack of acting resumes from the William Morris Agency, he decided to cast the saucer-eyed ingénue in BLACK SUNDAY, a role that made her a horror icon and earned her the nickname “Queen of all Screams.” .
  7. Two of Barbara Steele’s most famous paramours were actors Anthony Quinn and Peter O’Toole. Steele’s affair with Quinn is rumored to have lasted for years and occurred while he was married to Katherine DeMille, the daughter of Cecil B. DeMille. Steele’s romantic fling with O’Toole was short-lived but passionate and roused the attention of the paparazzi who relentlessly pursued the couple in Italy. The situation reached a fever pitch in 1964 leading to a violent altercation between O’Toole and a photographer who had momentarily blinded Steele with his camera’s flash. Steele and O’Toole were both subsequently arrested and questioned for hours by the Italian police but they were eventually let go. Afterward, the authorities attempted to press assault charges against O’Toole but he managed to avoid arrest with the assistance of his stunt double. 
  8. During the span of her career Steele collaborated with many talented directors besides Mario Bava such as Basil Dearden, Roger Corman, Riccardo Freda, Antonio Margheriti, Michael Reeves, Volker Schlöndorff, Louis Malle, Jonathan Demme and David Cronenberg. Despite the impressive scope of her filmography, Steele regularly singles out her work with Federico Fellini in 8 ½ and talks about the Italian filmmaker in glowing terms. In a forward she wrote for the book Fellini: The Sixties, Steele described what it was like to work with the acclaimed director explaining that: “Everyone who worked with him felt they shared a private secret with him — that he and he alone could mirror their souls like a great, slightly ironic Buddha.” 
  9. Steele’s only marriage has been to the screenwriter James Poe. The couple were together for nearly ten years between 1969-1978 and they had one child. Poe died in 1980 and today he’s best remembered as the man who wrote or co-wrote a number of Academy Award-nominated screenplays including AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 DAYS (’56), CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF (’58), LILIES OF THE FIELD (’63) and THEY SHOOT HORSES, DON’T THEY? (’70). 
  10. The actress has often been a reluctant interviewee and is known to frequently tell tall tales, forget facts and spin entertaining yarns. She most likely does so in order to keep herself occupied while having to answer the same questions over and over again from dull-headed reporters or worshipful fans like yours truly. With that mind, any or all of these “fun facts” could be white lies so enjoy them but don’t assume they’re written in stone. Barbara Steele is an enchanter who weaves her own unique kind of magic and she has certainly cast a spell on this writer.

people talk about the danger of violence or overt sexuality in children’s entertainment, but i swear that nothing, nothing fucked me up as badly as the totally family-friendly, g-rated trope of “woman who is not traditionally attractive flirts with our male lead; aren’t her romantic and/or sexual desires inherently disgusting, and thus hilarious?”

and like, at least when i was growing up, it was everywhere: disney movies, saturday morning cartoons–i think it was maybe even more common in stuff aimed at kids, because when you’re not allowed to go blue, there are fewer ways to get a lazy, cheap laugh.

i was freckle-faced and chubby as a kid (both, of course, common cartoon shorthand for “this girl is hideous”), and i literally cannot remember being too young to feel bad about how i looked. i’m sure my baby fat didn’t bother me when i was an actual baby, but my body issues are at least as old as my conscious memory. thank god i had access to feminism and cultural criticism from a comically young age; it rarely protected me from pain but at least i’d heard that it was wrong to send a message that beautiful princesses are protagonists and ugly girls are punchlines.

(as if we have to earn the right to even just want romantic love, to even just feel something for somebody else, as if we have to cash in tiny noses and perfect lips and tiny bodies like fucking arcade tokens before our heartsong is anything but a mean joke)

and granted, there were other issues at play; i’m not pinning all my baggage on, say, that part in aladdin where the fat lady with a gap in her teeth catches him while he’s running for his life and sings that she thinks he’s “rather tasty” and aladdin’s face is all “UGH, OH NOOO,” but i swear i didn’t start to internalize “no decent human being would be grossed out by your romantic interest, or even just find it so ludicrous as to be funny” until about six years ago

and i am five fucking days away from turning thirty

9

Inuyasha + Mythical Creatures (insp)

Happy Halloween!

8

This is Aranea.

She makes some pretty grand entrances. 
—– For FFXVWeek, Day 5, 8/17 (Episode Prompto/Aranea Highwind)

(Previously on ‘This Is…’)

5

One of the things I think is so incredible about these conventions is that it gives everybody a chance to come together and meet each other in person… I just think that it’s so cool to be a part of a show that seems to be bringing so many people together as friends, as partners, as lovers. All sorts of unions have been made because people like the show and it’s an incredibly rewarding feeling to be able to be a part of something that’s encouraging that. x

Her body is
a monument to the life she has lived,
a testament to the love she had to give.
Her flesh encapsulating
the finely ground stardust
that remains from a moonstruck soul
and glowing heart too big for the night sky.

So she aches
where there is no space for noise
no neon signs in her eyes
to give testimony to the words
inked deep beneath her skin.

She wonders,
Does the needle threading through the eye of her storm
attempt to pull together a lifetime of chaos only being held in place
by the centrifugal force of the never-ending maelstrom inside her soul?

She has offered herself as an altar
for all those searching for a place to call home;
Inscribed bloody pleas on the walls of her ribcage
as she fought to breathe long enough to be free.

There was never a time when she owned herself;
Instead renting space in her own head
while the demons danced and played
along the hollowed purse strings of her heart.
Bought and paid for by the pleasure she found in Love’s delights.
Cursed with knowing the carnal moorings fascinating even as they anchor her
Deep under the weight of all her sins.

Atonement cannot be found without a price;
And she is paying now,
with a string of cold and endless nights.

© Courtney Turley 2017