henry st

After everything, Blue’s St. Mark’s Eve tradition changes.

She does not go out to any churches. She stays away from the ley line.

She insists on a night in, and they end up having a picnic on the floor of Monmouth, amidst the cardboard miniature of the town that brought them together.

Ronan grumbles but shows up with a bunch of vegetables and fruit from the Barns (out of season and sometimes strange colours, but delicious) and Adam actually books it off work. Opal goes to spend the night at 300 Fox Way (and maybe dances with Gwenllian on the corpse road). Henry presents her with a book of maps, a subtle nod to the future, to making plans.

Gansey is unusually quiet, and so is Blue, and they hold hands most of the night. No one makes fun of them for it.

In their heads they’re both replaying prices of the same conversation, but that’s something they’ll discuss later, when the sun is out, when there’s no soaked shoulders in sight.

They spend the night with the people they love and they finally, finally start letting themselves believe that they get to continue to live. Blue starts to let go of the little nagging belief that it was her fault. Gansey traces Blue’s palm and wonders at what they’re all going to discover together.

As a group, they really start to understand that they’ve won themselves a lifetime of this, of these people and these feelings.

And without really talking about it, they set an extra plate for the friend they lost along the way.

anonymous asked:

Hi! I saw your post about the flowers, I was wondering if you could do a brief explanation of the different personalities??

Hey there! Did you mean like the MBTI personalities? I’ll do my best!

ENTJ - Logical, decisive, strategic. Natural leaders. Probably your boss. Not always a dictator. See also: Bill Gates, Jim Carrey, Alexander Hamilton, Princess Leia (Star Wars)

INTJ - Theoretical, driven, systematic. Natural innovators. Probably your class valedictorian. Not always a nerd. See also: C.S. Lewis, Isaac Newton, Jane Austen, Bruce Wayne (Batman)

ESTJ - Analytical, efficient, straightforward. Natural organizers. Probably president of something. Not always a control freak. See also: Henry Ford, Michelle Obama, St. Paul, Frank Sinatra, Dwight Schrute (The Office)

ISTJ - Factual, thorough, steadfast. Natural problem solvers. Probably a math whiz. Not always antisocial. See also: Queen Elizabeth II, George Washington, Jackie Joyner-Kersee, Ron Swanson (Parks and Recreation)

ENFJ - Enthusiastic, loyal, sociable. Natural diplomats. Probably your mom. Not always psychic. See also: Martin Luther King Jr., Johnny Depp, Nelson Mandela, Peeta Mellark (The Hunger Games)

INFJ - Insightful, compassionate, committed. Natural visionaries. Probably your fairy godmother. Not always impossibly rare. See also: Thomas Jefferson, Carrie Fisher, Adam Sandler, Atticus Finch (To Kill A Mockingbird)

ESFJ - Conscientious, sympathetic, responsive. Natural caregivers. Probably your teacher. Not always overly energetic. See also: Pope Francis, Andrew Carnegie, Anne Hathaway, Wendy Darling (Peter Pan)

ISFJ - Caring, practical, responsible. Natural nurturers. Probably the mom friend. Not always uber-traditional. See also: Mother Teresa, Rosa Parks, Louisa May Alcott, Winnie the Pooh

ENTP - Clever, confident, outspoken. Natural questioners. Probably your local mad scientist. Not always a living meme. See also: Tom Hanks, Nikola Tesla, Alfred Hitchcock, Dr. Emmett Brown (Back to the Future)

INTP - Curious, speculative, original. Natural theorists. Probably extremely witty. Not always robotic/immune to feeling. See also: Albert Einstein, Abraham Lincoln, Meryl Streep, Luna Lovegood (Harry Potter)

ESTP - Observant, spontaneous, energetic. Natural doers. Probably athletic. Not always midlessly active. See also: Eddie Murphy, Winston Churchill, Lucille Ball, Merida (Brave)

ISTP - Adventurous, independent, adaptable. Natural craftsmen. Probably a lone wolf. Not always apathetic. See also: Tom Cruise, Steve Jobs, James Dean, Han Solo (Star Wars)

ENFP - Expressive, imaginative, gregarious. Natural communicators. Probably the quirky nerd that everyone loves. Not always the physical embodiment of sunshine. See also: Dr. Seuss, Robin Williams, Mark Twain, Genie (Aladdin)

INFP - Empathetic, harmonious, sensitive. Natural idealists. Probably a dreamer and a bookworm. Not always crying over everything. See also: William Shakespeare, Mr. Rogers, Helen Keller, Kermit the Frog (The Muppets)

ESFP - Vivacious, playful, easygoing. Natural entertainers. Probably an actor, comedian, etc. Not always 24/7 partying. See also: Marylin Monroe, Elvis Presley, Pablo Picasso, Penny Hofstadter (The Big Bang Theory)

ISFP - Peaceful, understanding, realistic. Natural composers. Probably a nature lover. Not always an artist. See also: Paul McCartney, Princess Diana, Rihanna, Princess Buttercup (The Princess Bride)

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My solo show, Total Parallaxxx, opens this Saturday from 7-10 pm in NYC, & runs every nite from 7 pm - 11 pm for one week 📺🌷✨ Anything can happen at the nite show 🌙 191 Henry St • Presented by @fineartclub_

10

Hump Day Hunks 

Owen Farrell Squares Off Against Henry Slade.

Henry Slade Has Such A Ravishing Rump.

Woof, Baby!

If we are mark’d to die, we are enow
    To do our country loss; and if to live,
    The fewer men, the greater share of honour.
    God’s will! I pray thee, wish not one man more.
    By Jove, I am not covetous for gold,
    Nor care I who doth feed upon my cost;
    It yearns me not if men my garments wear;
    Such outward things dwell not in my desires.
    But if it be a sin to covet honour,
    I am the most offending soul alive.
    No, faith, my coz, wish not a man from England.
    God’s peace! I would not lose so great an honour
    As one man more methinks would share from me
    For the best hope I have. O, do not wish one more!
    Rather proclaim it, Westmoreland, through my host,
    That he which hath no stomach to this fight,
    Let him depart; his passport shall be made,
    And crowns for convoy put into his purse;
    We would not die in that man’s company
    That fears his fellowship to die with us.
    This day is call’d the feast of Crispian.
    He that outlives this day, and comes safe home,
    Will stand a tip-toe when this day is nam’d,
    And rouse him at the name of Crispian.
    He that shall live this day, and see old age,
    Will yearly on the vigil feast his neighbours,
    And say ‘To-morrow is Saint Crispian.’
    Then will he strip his sleeve and show his scars,
    And say 'These wounds I had on Crispian’s day.’
    Old men forget; yet all shall be forgot,
    But he’ll remember, with advantages,
    What feats he did that day. Then shall our names,
    Familiar in his mouth as household words-
    Harry the King, Bedford and Exeter,
    Warwick and Talbot, Salisbury and Gloucester-
    Be in their flowing cups freshly rememb'red.
    This story shall the good man teach his son;
    And Crispin Crispian shall ne'er go by,
    From this day to the ending of the world,
    But we in it shall be remembered-
    We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;
    For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
    Shall be my brother; be he ne'er so vile,
    This day shall gentle his condition;
    And gentlemen in England now-a-bed
    Shall think themselves accurs’d they were not here,
    And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks
    That fought with us upon Saint Crispin’s day.

—Henry V, Act IV, SCENE iii

The Family of Henry VII with St George and the Dragon

At left, Henry VII, with Prince Arthur behind him, then Prince Henry (later Henry VIII), and Prince Edmund, who did not survive early childhood. To the right is Elizabeth of York, with Princess Margaret, then Princess Elizabeth who didn’t survive childhood, Princess Mary, and Princess Katherine, who died shortly after her birth.

Mugwort

(Artemisia vulgaris) Do not take if pregnant.

Folk Names: Artemis Herb, Artemisia, Felon Herb, Muggons, Naughty Man, Old Man, Old Uncle Henry, Sailor’s Tobacco, St. John’s Plant.
Gender: Feminine.
Planet: Venus.
Element: Earth.
Deities: Artemis, Diana.
Powers: Strength, Psychic Powers, Protection, Prophetic Dreams, Healing, Astral Projection.

Magical Uses: Place mugwort in the shoes to gain strength during long walks or runs. For this purpose pick mugwort before sunrise, saying:

Tollam te artemesia, ne lassus sim in via.

A pillow stuffed with mugwort and slept upon will produce prophetic dreams. Mugwort is also burned with sandalwood or wormwood during scrying rituals, and a mugwort infusion is drunk (sweetened with honey) before divination.
The infusion is also used to wash crystal balls and magic mirrors, and mugwort leaves are placed around the base of the ball (or beneath it) to aid in psychic workings.
When carrying mugwort you cannot be harmed by poison, wild beasts, or sunstroke, according to ancient tradition. In a building, mugwort prevents elves and “evil thynges” from entering, and bunches of mugwort are used in Japan by the Ainus to exorcise spirits of disease who are thought to hate the odor. In China, it is hung over doors to keep evil spirits from buildings.
Mugwort is also carried to increase lust and fertility, to prevent backache, and to cure disease and madness. Placed next to the bed, it aids in achieving astral projection.

(from Cunningham’s Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs by Scott Cunningham)

Changeling

Der Wechselbalg by Henry Fuseli, 1781

Changeling is a creature found in folklore and folk religion. A changeling child was believed to be a fairy child that had been left in place of a human child stolen by the fairies. The theme of the swapped child is common in medieval literature and reflects concern over infants thought to be afflicted with unexplained diseases, disorders, or developmental disabilities.

A human child might be taken due to many factors: to act as a servant, the love of a human child, or malice. Most often it was thought that fairies exchanged the children. In rare cases, the very elderly of the Fairy people would be exchanged in the place of a human baby, and then the old fairy could live in comfort, being coddled by its human parents. Simple charms, such as an inverted coat or open iron scissors left where the child sleeps, were thought to ward them off; other measures included a constant watch over the child.

The devil steals a baby and leaves a changeling behind, early 15th century, detail of “The legend of St. Stephen” by Martino di Bartolomeo 

flickr

‘Children’s Window’ by Henry Holiday by Glass Angel
Via Flickr:
Nave, south aisle, 'Children’s Window’ by Henry Holiday, made by Powells, 1889. In memory of Forster (of the 1870 Education Act) and Matthew Arnold, poet and HM Inspector of Schools. Strange angle due to a large children’s play tent being erected right up against the wall beneath the window! Detail